Getting pregnantGGetting pregnantGetting pregnantEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000052.0000000000000737.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information to consider when thinking of getting pregnant, including the benefits and drawbacks of getting pregnant in your 20s, 30s, or 40s</p><p>Getting pregnant is not as easy as you might think. A healthy couple at the prime reproductive age has about a 25% chance of conceiving each month. Only about half of all couples get pregnant within six months of trying, but most – 85% – do become pregnant within a year. Becoming pregnant takes time; don’t assume it will happen right away.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>If you want to become pregnant, see your doctor first for advice on health before pregnancy.</li> <li>If you are planning to become pregnant, you will need to stop your birth control</li> <li>The return of your fertility will depend on the type of contraception you were using.</li></ul>
Devenir enceinteDDevenir enceinteGetting pregnantFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000052.0000000000000737.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Importante information à laquelle réfléchir si vous planifiez de devenir enceinte, y compris les avantages et les inconvénients associés à une grossesse dans la vingtaine, la trentaine ou la quarantaine.</p><p>Devenir enceinte n’est pas aussi facile que le pensez. Pour un couple sain ayant atteint l’âge où il est le plus apte à procréer, la probabilité qu’il procrée chaque mois est d’environ 25 %. Seule la moitié des couples devient enceinte après six mois d’essai, mais la plupart, soit 85 %, y parviennent après une année. Il faut du temps pour devenir enceinte. Ne supposez pas que cela va arriver tout de suite. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Si vous voulez devenir enceinte, consultez d'abord votre médecin afin de recevoir des conseils de santé avant la grossesse.</li> <li>Si vous planifiez de devenir enceinte, vous devrez arrêter d'utiliser votre moyen contraceptif.</li> <li>Le retour de votre fertilité dépendra du type de moyen contraceptif que vous employez.</li></ul>

 

 

Getting pregnant314.000000000000Getting pregnantGetting pregnantGEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC11.000000000000052.0000000000000737.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Important information to consider when thinking of getting pregnant, including the benefits and drawbacks of getting pregnant in your 20s, 30s, or 40s</p><p>Getting pregnant is not as easy as you might think. A healthy couple at the prime reproductive age has about a 25% chance of conceiving each month. Only about half of all couples get pregnant within six months of trying, but most – 85% – do become pregnant within a year. Becoming pregnant takes time; don’t assume it will happen right away.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>If you want to become pregnant, see your doctor first for advice on health before pregnancy.</li> <li>If you are planning to become pregnant, you will need to stop your birth control</li> <li>The return of your fertility will depend on the type of contraception you were using.</li></ul><p>If you want to become pregnant, the first thing you need to do is see your doctor, who can give you advice about health care before pregnancy. Nutrition and exercise are very important, to ensure that you are in the best physical shape for pregnancy. Certain health conditions and infections can affect your baby during pregnancy, as can the use of drugs or alcohol. So it is important to get all these factors under control before trying to become pregnant. </p><h2>When is the ideal time to become pregnant?</h2><p>From a strictly biological point of view, your 20s is the best time to conceive and carry a baby. The average woman’s fertility peaks around age 24. In your 20s, you have more healthy egg cells, and your risks of having a miscarriage or a baby with birth defects are lower than in subsequent decades. You have a lower risk of pregnancy complications such as high blood pressure or diabetes. Once your baby arrives, you are likely to have more energy to deal with the challenges than if you are older. However, in your 20s, you are likely to still be carving out a career path, and having a baby at this time can affect your professional life. Your earning power may be low, and you might find yourself running into debt problems. You may be in a new marriage, or simply enjoying life, and a baby can pose a real challenge. </p><p>Having a baby in your 30s makes practical and financial sense. You are likely to have established your career, and your earning power may be higher than in your 20s. You may also be more relaxed about parenting than you would have been in your 20s. At the same time, you are still likely to have a lot of energy and stamina, which will come in handy when taking care of your baby. However, once you reach age 35, there is a decline in fertility, and birth defects such as Down syndrome, other genetic abnormalities, and cardiac defects become more of a concern. After age 35, you will be offered screening and diagnostic tests to help determine the risk that your baby may have a birth defect. Rates for pregnancy-related complications such as ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage, as well as caesarean section, also rise after age 35. </p><p>If you choose to have a baby in your 40s, you are likely to be more financially secure and comfortable in your career. Your marriage or relationship may be much stronger than in your 20s, because you have had time to grow together through a variety of circumstances. A strong relationship can provide a solid foundation for raising a family. Although you may have less energy than in previous decades, you may also put less pressure on yourself to be the "perfect parent." However, there are obvious downsides to becoming pregnant in your 40s. First of all, there is a steep drop in fertility in your 40s. Also, there are higher rates of pregnancy complications such as high blood pressure, diabetes, placental problems, and birth complications. If you do decide to become pregnant in your 40s, try not to become disheartened. Although the rates of pregnancy complications are higher than in your 20s or 30s, you still have a good chance of having a healthy baby. </p><h2>Stopping your birth control</h2><p>If you are planning to become pregnant, you will need to stop your birth control. You may assume that you will become pregnant as soon as you discontinue your contraception, but that is not always the case since the average couple not using contraception only has a 25% chance of conceiving in any month. The return of your fertility will depend on the type of contraception you were using: </p><ul><li>The contraceptive pill ("the Pill" for short) stops the woman’s body from releasing an egg during ovulation. After the Pill is stopped, it takes up to four weeks for the normal menstrual cycle to start up again. On average, it takes about two to three months to conceive after stopping the Pill. </li><li>Progesterone injections are meant to provide a woman with about three months of contraception after the injection is given. Once the injections are stopped, it takes much longer to become fertile, compared with the Pill. This is because the medication in the injections takes a longer time to be cleared from your body. Normal fertility is usually restored within eight to 15 months after discontinuing these injections. </li><li>Intrauterine devices (IUD) do not interfere with the woman’s menstrual cycle. Therefore, as soon as an IUD is removed, a woman should physically be able to conceive. There is a chance of becoming pregnant while on IUD contraception. If this happens, it presents an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage. </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/getting_pregnant.jpgGetting pregnant

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