Asthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visitAAsthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visitAsthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visitEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsRespiratory systemConditions and diseases;Drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)Cough;Wheezing2018-07-19T04:00:00ZKelly Andersonclodagh.mccarthy@sickkids.ca | Clodagh McCarthy | 693A30232E777C7369636B6B6964735C636C6F64616768206D63636172746879 i:0#.w|sickkids\clodagh mccarthyHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Asthma is a condition that affects the lungs and causes breathing difficulties. Learn how to recognize, manage and treat asthma at home. <br></p><h2>What is asthma?</h2><p>Asthma is a condition that affects your child’s lungs. When asthma is not well controlled, the airways narrow, swell and produce mucus. This makes it difficult to breathe.<br></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Narrowing of airways in asthma</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Asthma_narrow_airways_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">During an asthma attack, the muscles around the airways get tight. The airways become narrow, swell and produce mucus, making it hard to breathe.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When asthma is not well controlled, the airways narrow, swell and produce mucus, causing breathing difficulties.</li><li>Early signs of breathing difficulties include coughing and wheezing. Late signs include fast breathing, pale skin and flared nostrils.</li><li>The most effective way to control your child's asthma is to minimize any triggers such as cigarette smoke, dust mites and mould.<br></li><li>The medicines you will use to treat your child's asthma are decided by an "asthma action plan" that you develop with your child's doctor.<br></li></ul><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of asthma?</h2><h3>Early warning signs</h3><p>Early warning signs of breathing difficulties include:</p><ul><li>coughing</li><li>wheezing (noisy breathing)</li><li>being less active than normal</li><li>not keeping up with friends when playing</li><li>difficulty with feeding (for infants).</li></ul><h3>Late warning signs</h3><p>Late warning signs that your child is having trouble breathing include:</p><ul><li>fast breathing</li><li>pale skin</li><li>blue or grey skin colour around the mouth</li><li>difficulty speaking in full sentences</li><li>skin pulling in between or under ribs and in the neck (due to breathing effort)</li><li>nostrils flaring when breathing.<br></li></ul><p>If you see any of these late warning signs, <strong>see a doctor immediately</strong>.<br></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Late warning signs of breathing trouble</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/AsthmaSymptoms_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Additional late warning signs of breathing trouble include fast breathing, pale skin, blue or grey skin around the mouth and difficulty speaking in full sentences. If you see any of these signs, see a doctor immediately. </figcaption> </figure> <h2>How is asthma treated?</h2><p>Asthma can be treated with a range of medicines. Your child’s asthma medicines are part of an “asthma action plan” that you will develop with your child’s doctor.</p><h3>Rescue medicine</h3><ul><li>This medicine comes in a blue puffer.</li><li>It relaxes the muscles around the airways to provide immediate relief when your child finds it hard to breathe.</li><li>One example is salbutamol, also known by the brand name Ventolin.</li></ul><h3>Controller medicine </h3><ul><li>This medicine often comes in an orange or a brown puffer.</li><li>It reduces swelling and mucus in the lungs.</li><li>It does not provide immediate relief. Instead, your child should take it regularly, even when they are feeling well.</li><li>One example is fluticasone, also known by the brand name Flovent.</li></ul><h3>Oral steroids (liquid or tablet medicine taken by mouth)</h3><ul><li>These are powerful medicines that reduce swelling in the lungs.</li><li>Your child should take them only for a short time until their asthma is back under control.</li><li>Examples of oral steroids include dexamethasone and prednisolone.</li></ul> <p>For more information, you can contact Ontario Lung Association's Lung Health Information Line on <strong>1-888-344-LUNG</strong> (5864) from 8.30 to 4.30, Monday to Friday.<br></p>

 

 

Asthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visit3263.00000000000Asthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visitAsthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visitAEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsRespiratory systemConditions and diseases;Drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)Cough;Wheezing2018-07-19T04:00:00ZKelly Andersonclodagh.mccarthy@sickkids.ca | Clodagh McCarthy | 693A30232E777C7369636B6B6964735C636C6F64616768206D63636172746879 i:0#.w|sickkids\clodagh mccarthyHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>​Asthma is a condition that affects the lungs and causes breathing difficulties. Learn how to recognize, manage and treat asthma at home. <br></p><h2>What is asthma?</h2><p>Asthma is a condition that affects your child’s lungs. When asthma is not well controlled, the airways narrow, swell and produce mucus. This makes it difficult to breathe.<br></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Narrowing of airways in asthma</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Asthma_narrow_airways_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">During an asthma attack, the muscles around the airways get tight. The airways become narrow, swell and produce mucus, making it hard to breathe.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When asthma is not well controlled, the airways narrow, swell and produce mucus, causing breathing difficulties.</li><li>Early signs of breathing difficulties include coughing and wheezing. Late signs include fast breathing, pale skin and flared nostrils.</li><li>The most effective way to control your child's asthma is to minimize any triggers such as cigarette smoke, dust mites and mould.<br></li><li>The medicines you will use to treat your child's asthma are decided by an "asthma action plan" that you develop with your child's doctor.<br></li></ul><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of asthma?</h2><h3>Early warning signs</h3><p>Early warning signs of breathing difficulties include:</p><ul><li>coughing</li><li>wheezing (noisy breathing)</li><li>being less active than normal</li><li>not keeping up with friends when playing</li><li>difficulty with feeding (for infants).</li></ul><h3>Late warning signs</h3><p>Late warning signs that your child is having trouble breathing include:</p><ul><li>fast breathing</li><li>pale skin</li><li>blue or grey skin colour around the mouth</li><li>difficulty speaking in full sentences</li><li>skin pulling in between or under ribs and in the neck (due to breathing effort)</li><li>nostrils flaring when breathing.<br></li></ul><p>If you see any of these late warning signs, <strong>see a doctor immediately</strong>.<br></p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Late warning signs of breathing trouble</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/AsthmaSymptoms_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Additional late warning signs of breathing trouble include fast breathing, pale skin, blue or grey skin around the mouth and difficulty speaking in full sentences. If you see any of these signs, see a doctor immediately. </figcaption> </figure> <h2>How is asthma treated?</h2><p>Asthma can be treated with a range of medicines. Your child’s asthma medicines are part of an “asthma action plan” that you will develop with your child’s doctor.</p><h3>Rescue medicine</h3><ul><li>This medicine comes in a blue puffer.</li><li>It relaxes the muscles around the airways to provide immediate relief when your child finds it hard to breathe.</li><li>One example is salbutamol, also known by the brand name Ventolin.</li></ul><h3>Controller medicine </h3><ul><li>This medicine often comes in an orange or a brown puffer.</li><li>It reduces swelling and mucus in the lungs.</li><li>It does not provide immediate relief. Instead, your child should take it regularly, even when they are feeling well.</li><li>One example is fluticasone, also known by the brand name Flovent.</li></ul><h3>Oral steroids (liquid or tablet medicine taken by mouth)</h3><ul><li>These are powerful medicines that reduce swelling in the lungs.</li><li>Your child should take them only for a short time until their asthma is back under control.</li><li>Examples of oral steroids include dexamethasone and prednisolone.</li></ul> <h2>How do I use a puffer to give asthma medicine to my child?</h2><p>Always use a spacer with a puffer to help the medicine enter your child’s lungs.</p><ol class="akh-steps"><li> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Asthma_ShakePuffer_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Remove the cap and shake the puffer five times.</p></li><li> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Asthma_PufferSpacer_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Put the puffer upright into the rubber hole of the spacer. </p></li><li><p>Have your child sit up or stand in a comfortable position and put the mask firmly on their face. Be sure to cover their mouth and nose.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Asthma_OlderChildPositioning_EN.jpg" alt="" /></figure> <ul><li>Older children can sit or stand in a comfortable position while you give them their puffer.</li></ul></div><div class="row"><ul><li>Younger children should be held on a parent’s lap. You can then use the “one-person approach” or “two-person approach” to give medicine to a younger child.</li></ul><div class="asset-2-up"> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">One-person approach</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Asthma_OnePersonApproach_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Sit in a chair and place your child on your lap. Hug the child tightly with one arm and, with your other hand, press the top of the puffer firmly to release a puff of medicine.</figcaption></figure> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Two-person approach</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Asthma_TwoPersonApproach_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Cross your leg over your child’s legs, hold their arms with your own arm and hold their forehead against your chest. Another adult will hold your child’s chin, place the mask firmly over your child’s nose and mouth and press the top of the puffer firmly to release a puff of medicine. </figcaption></figure> </div></div></div></li><li> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/HowToUse_MDI_with_Spacer_5_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Press the top of the puffer firmly. This will release one puff of medicine. Hold the mask over your child’s nose and mouth for 15 seconds.</p></li><li><p>Encourage your child to take deep breaths.</p></li></ol><p>If your child needs more than one puff of the medicine, remove the puffer from the spacer and repeat steps 1 to 5.</p><h2>What to do when you finish giving asthma medicine with the puffer</h2><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HowToUse_MDI_with_Spacer_6_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Take the mask off your child’s face and encourage them to drink or rinse their mouth with water.</p></div></div></div><h2>My child does not like using their puffer. What can I do?</h2><p>Giving puffers may upset a young child. This is natural.</p><p>Try to make it fun for your child by singing, counting, watching a video or showing how to use the puffer on yourself or a teddy bear. Your child will become more comfortable with puffers over time.</p><p>If you would prefer not to wake your child overnight or during a nap, it is fine to give a puffer when they are sleeping.</p><h2>How often do I need to replace my child’s spacer?</h2><p>The spacer you receive from the hospital should be used only for a short time. You will then need to buy a spacer from your pharmacy. Most spacers last about a year before you need to replace them.</p><h2>How do I clean my child’s spacer?</h2><p>Once a week, wash the spacer with soap and warm water by hand and let it air dry. Or you can put the spacer in the top shelf of your dishwasher on a low heat setting.</p><p>It is very important to wash the spacer regularly to clear any build-up of saliva and medicines.<br></p><br><h2>How can I control my child’s asthma?</h2><p>The most effective way to control your child's asthma is to minimize any triggers that can make it worse. </p><p>The most common triggers are viral infections such as colds and the flu. Other triggers include:</p><ul><li>cigarette smoke</li><li>air pollution</li><li>dust mites</li><li>cold air</li><li>pet dander</li><li>pollen<br></li><li>mould.<br><br></li></ul> <p>For more information, you can contact Ontario Lung Association's Lung Health Information Line on <strong>1-888-344-LUNG</strong> (5864) from 8.30 to 4.30, Monday to Friday.<br></p>Asthma: Managing your child's asthma after an emergency room visitFalse

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