The first trimester: Month threeTThe first trimester: Month threeThe first trimester: Month threeEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00Z8.0000000000000068.0000000000000548.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page describes fetal development in the third month of pregnancy. The development of facial features and the placenta are discussed.</p><p>The embryo continues to develop rapidly during the third month of the first trimester. By the end of the month it will being to look distinctly like a human baby.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Starting around week 11 after the mother’s last menstrual period, the embryo is referred to as a fetus.</li> <li>Exposure to harmful substances called teratogens during this time may lead to abnormal growth and development.</li></ul>
Le premier trimestre : troisième moisLLe premier trimestre : troisième moisThe first trimester: Month threeFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00Z8.0000000000000068.0000000000000548.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page décrit le développement fœtal au troisième mois de grossesse. Elle contient de l’information sur le développement des traits faciaux et du placenta.</p><p>L’embryon continue de se développer rapidement au cours du troisième mois du premier trimestre. À la fin du mois, il commencera vraiment à ressembler à un bébé humain.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>À partir de la onzième semaine suivant les dernières menstruations de la mère, on se réfère à l’embryon en parlant de fœtus.</li><li>À ce moment, l’exposition à des substances nuisibles appelées tératogènes pourrait mener à des anomalies de croissance et de développement. </li></ul>

 

 

The first trimester: Month three331.000000000000The first trimester: Month threeThe first trimester: Month threeTEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00Z8.0000000000000068.0000000000000548.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page describes fetal development in the third month of pregnancy. The development of facial features and the placenta are discussed.</p><p>The embryo continues to develop rapidly during the third month of the first trimester. By the end of the month it will being to look distinctly like a human baby.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Starting around week 11 after the mother’s last menstrual period, the embryo is referred to as a fetus.</li> <li>Exposure to harmful substances called teratogens during this time may lead to abnormal growth and development.</li></ul><h2>Weeks nine and 10 of pregnancy</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Week Nine</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Fetus_week9_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /></figure> <p>By weeks nine to 10, the embryo measures about 2.5 cm (1 inch) from crown to rump, and it weighs about 4 g (one-seventh of an ounce).</p><p>During these two weeks, the upper and lower limbs undergo a lot of changes. The bones start to harden. Notches appear between the buds at the ends of the hands, clearly marking the beginnings of fingers. At the start of week 10, the fingers are still very short and webbed. </p><p>The feet begin to develop in a similar fashion as the hands. By the end of week 10, all regions of the limbs are visible. The fingers and toes have grown and are separated. Limb movements first occur during week 10. The tail is still present but stubby, and it disappears entirely by the end of that week. </p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Week 10</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Fetus_week10_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>By the end of week 10, the embryo looks distinctly human, but its head is still very large compared with the body. The neck is visible and the eyelids are formed. The outer ears almost look like real ears! They are set quite low on the sides of the head, close to the neck. The genitals are forming, but they are not distinct enough yet for lay people to tell the sex of the embryo.</p><p>The heart rate around this time is at least 130 beats per minute, and it may be as high as 160 beats per minute. From this point on, a normal heart rate can range anywhere from 110 to 160 beats per minute. The heart rate decreases gradually throughout the rest of the pregnancy. </p><h2>Weeks 11 to 13 of pregnancy</h2><p>Starting around week 11 after the mother’s last menstrual period, the embryo is referred to as a fetus. Weeks 11 to 13 is a time of rapid growth for the fetus. Most of the major organ systems have already developed to some extent by now. The tissues and organs continue to develop. The growth of the head slows down in comparison to the body. </p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Week 13</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Fetus_week_13_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>At week 11, the face is broad, the eyes are widely separated on the face, the eyelids are fused, and the ears are still low-set close to the neck. Between weeks 11 and 14, the face becomes more human-looking. The eyes move toward the front of the face. The ears move into position at the sides of the head.</p><p>Between weeks 11 and 13, the fetus starts to make urine and begins to transfer waste products to their mother through the placenta. In week 12, the intestinal loops, which had been bulging into the umbilical cord, move back into the abdomen. </p><p>Because the central nervous system, heart, limbs, eyes, and ears are in their critical stages of development this month, exposure to harmful substances called teratogens during this time may lead to abnormal growth and development. </p><h4>About your pregnancy</h4><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=321&language=English">The Third Month</a> </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Fetus_week_13_MED_ILL_EN.jpgThe first trimester: Month three

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