The third trimesterTThe third trimesterThe third trimesterEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSCJon Barrett, MD, FRCSCMichael Wiley, BSc, MSc, PhD8.0000000000000065.0000000000000872.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about fetal development in the third trimester of pregnancy. Answers provided by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>We’re getting down to the home stretch! The third trimester of pregnancy is about gaining weight and growing. Most of the actual organ system development is complete, with the exception of the lungs, which continue to develop during this trimester. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>During the seventh month, the lungs are now capable of breathing air, and therefore, a baby born at this time has a reasonable chance of surviving with intensive care.</li> <li>The baby gains 230 g (about half a pound) every week during the eighth month of pregnancy.</li> <li>keep track of your unborn baby’s kick counts from about six months of pregnancy, as a way of making sure that they are okay.</li></ul>
Le troisième trimestreLLe troisième trimestreThe third trimesterFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Jon Barrett, MD, FRCSC Michael Wiley, BSc, MSc, PhD8.0000000000000065.0000000000000872.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez comment le fœtus se développe durant le troisième trimestre de la grossesse. Des réponses fiables sont fournies par les hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>Vous avez maintenant atteint la dernière ligne droite! Le troisième trimestre de la grossesse se structure autour de la prise de poids et de la croissance. La plupart des systèmes d’organes sont formés, à l’exception des poumons qui continuent de se développer au cours de ce troisième trimestre.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Au cours du septième mois, les poumons sont maintenant capables de respirer de l’air, et de ce fait, un bébé né à ce moment a des chances raisonnables de survivre avec des soins intensifs. </li> <li>Le bébé gagne 230 g (environ une demie livre) chaque semaine au cours du huitième mois de grossesse.</li> <li>À partir du sixième mois de grossesse, il est recommandé de surveiller le nombre de coups de pied que donne votre bébé de façon à vous assurer qu’il se porte bien. </li></ul>

 

 

The third trimester333.000000000000The third trimesterThe third trimesterTEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSCJon Barrett, MD, FRCSCMichael Wiley, BSc, MSc, PhD8.0000000000000065.0000000000000872.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about fetal development in the third trimester of pregnancy. Answers provided by Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>We’re getting down to the home stretch! The third trimester of pregnancy is about gaining weight and growing. Most of the actual organ system development is complete, with the exception of the lungs, which continue to develop during this trimester. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>During the seventh month, the lungs are now capable of breathing air, and therefore, a baby born at this time has a reasonable chance of surviving with intensive care.</li> <li>The baby gains 230 g (about half a pound) every week during the eighth month of pregnancy.</li> <li>keep track of your unborn baby’s kick counts from about six months of pregnancy, as a way of making sure that they are okay.</li></ul><h2>The seventh month of pregnancy (weeks 27 to 30)</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Month Seven</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Baby_month7_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>There is a considerable amount of fat, about 3% of body weight, under the skin now, which smooths out a lot of the wrinkles. Space starts to get tight in the womb. As a result, the baby starts to move about less vigourously. To get comfortable, they take on a curled-up position in the uterus, with their arms and legs crossed.</p><p>During this period, the lungs are now capable of breathing air, and therefore, a baby born at this time has a reasonable chance of surviving with intensive care. The central nervous system has matured to a point where it can direct the rhythmic breathing movements and control body temperature.</p><p>At 28 weeks, the eyes reopen and the eyelashes develop. The liver and spleen are now important sites of blood cell production. By 30 weeks, however, the bone marrow takes over the production of red blood cells. By 30 weeks in males, the testes begin to move downward into the pouch of skin below the abdomen called the scrotum.</p><h2>The eighth month of pregnancy (weeks 31 to 35)</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Month Eight</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Baby_month8_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>During this period, weight gain chugs along at rapid speed. The baby gains 230 g (about half a pound) every week at this stage. Usually by this stage, the baby has adopted a head-down position in the uterus, in which they will most likely stay until birth.</p><p>By the end of week 31, the organs are almost completely developed, apart from the lungs which are still not fully mature. The baby may suck their thumb, hiccough, or cry. They have distinct sleep and wake habits. They can taste sweet or sour. The baby responds to stimuli such as pain, light, and sound. The toenails are now visible, and the baby has quite a bit of soft downy body hair called lanugo, and hair on their head.</p><p>Baby becomes very energetic this month and has periods of extreme activity. their movements will peak in week 32. You will be able to feel them twist and turn. By week 33, the baby’s movements will become smaller because they will be too big to swoop around in the womb anymore. They may hiccough from time to time, causing small rhythmic bumps in the uterus.</p><p>The baby’s heart rate is generally around 130 to 140 beats per minute. Although it has been suggested that the heart rate may differ depending on whether the baby is a boy or girl, there is no evidence to prove this.</p><p>All of the organs are in place and most systems are well developed. The lungs, however, may still be immature. Babies born at 34 weeks or later have a very good chance of survival.</p><h2>The ninth month of pregnancy (weeks 36 to 40)</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Month Nine</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Baby_month9_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Baby becomes pretty plump this month. By full-term, fat makes up about 16% of the baby’s body weight. they now measure 50 cm (20 inches) and weighs around 3400 g (7.5 lbs). More confined, and possibly engaged in the pelvis, the baby may feel less active.</p><p>At this point, the baby's skin is pink and smooth, and the upper and lower limbs are chubby.</p><p>At 37 weeks, your baby has a firm grasp and shows a spontaneous orientation to light. The nervous system is now very mature. There is little space to maneuver in the uterus now, and the baby moves less. There are only jabs from the feet and knees, and movements of the baby’s head against the cervix.</p><p>During week 37, the fine hair called lanugo that covers your baby’s body begins to wear off. At full term, the skin is normally bluish-pink. The chest is prominent. In males, the testes have descended into the scrotum. The intestines are filled with meconium, which consists of cells shed from the lining of the gut; this will make up your baby’s first bowel movement after birth. Although the head is smaller in relation to the rest of the body compared with earlier months, it is still quite large and is a major consideration during birth. Your baby's immune system is still quite immature and will continue to develop after birth.</p><p>Sometime this month, your baby’s head may begin to settle downward, deep inside the pelvis. This is called "lightening" because there will be less pressure on your abdomen, and you will find it easier to breathe when this happens.</p><h2>Kick counts</h2><p>It is recommended that you keep track of your unborn baby’s kick counts from about six months of pregnancy, as a way of making sure that they are okay. Each day, time how long it takes for your baby to make 10 kicks, flutters, swishes, or rolls. You should feel at least 10 movements within two hours, but you will probably feel that many movements in a much shorter amount of time.</p><p>Use a notebook to record the time that you feel each kick, flutter, swish, or roll, until your baby has made 10 movements. You may start to notice patterns and a general length of time that baby usually takes to make 10 movements. If you notice major deviations from the pattern, check with your health-care provider.</p><p>For more information, see <a href="/Article?contentid=340&language=English">Kick Counts.</a></p><h4>About your pregnancy</h4><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=325&language=English">The Seventh Month</a> </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=326&language=English">The Eighth Month</a> </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=327&language=English">The Ninth Month</a> </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Baby_month8_MED_ILL_EN.jpgThe third trimester

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