Nausea and vomitingNNausea and vomitingNausea and vomitingEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)Nausea;Vomiting2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000042.0000000000000710.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, including a severe form of nausea and vomiting called hyperemesis gravidarum.</p><p>Nausea and vomiting affect about 50% to 90% of women who are pregnant. This condition, commonly referred to as “morning sickness,” is usually mild or moderate. Nausea and vomiting usually starts between weeks four and seven of pregnancy, and continues for much of the first trimester. Most women are free of symptoms by week 20.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Most women will experience mild or moderate nausea or "morning sickness," however some women may experience a severe form called hyperemesis gravidarum.</li> <li>Nausea and vomiting, including hyperemesis gravidarum, does not appear to have an adverse effect on the outcome of pregnancy or the baby’s health as long as the mother can keep hydrated.</li> <li>The treatment of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy depends on how severe the symptoms are.</li></ul>
Nausées et vomissementsNNausées et vomissementsNausea and vomitingFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)Nausea;Vomiting2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000042.0000000000000710.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Lisez l’information relative aux nausées et vomissements associés à la grossesse, y compris leur forme sévère appelée hyperemesis gravidarum.</p><p>Les nausées et vomissements touchent de 50 à 90 % des femmes enceintes. Communément appelée « maladie du matin », ce trouble est habituellement léger à modéré. D’ordinaire, les nausées et vomissements débutent entre la quatrième et la septième semaine de grossesse et se poursuivent une bonne partie du premier trimestre. La plupart des femmes ne manifestent plus de symptômes dès la 20<sup>è</sup> semaine.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La plupart des femmes ressentiront des nausées légères ou modérées (ou « nausées matinales »), mais certaines femmes peuvent en subir une forme extrême nommée hyperémèse.</li> <li>Les nausées et les vomissements, y compris l’hyperémèse, ne semblent pas avoir d’effet adverse sur la grossesse ou la santé à long terme du bébé, tant que la mère s’hydrate bien.</li> <li>Le traitement de la nausée et des vomissements au cours de la grossesse dépend de la gravité des symptômes. </li></ul>

 

 

Nausea and vomiting347.000000000000Nausea and vomitingNausea and vomitingNEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)Nausea;Vomiting2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000042.0000000000000710.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, including a severe form of nausea and vomiting called hyperemesis gravidarum.</p><p>Nausea and vomiting affect about 50% to 90% of women who are pregnant. This condition, commonly referred to as “morning sickness,” is usually mild or moderate. Nausea and vomiting usually starts between weeks four and seven of pregnancy, and continues for much of the first trimester. Most women are free of symptoms by week 20.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Most women will experience mild or moderate nausea or "morning sickness," however some women may experience a severe form called hyperemesis gravidarum.</li> <li>Nausea and vomiting, including hyperemesis gravidarum, does not appear to have an adverse effect on the outcome of pregnancy or the baby’s health as long as the mother can keep hydrated.</li> <li>The treatment of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy depends on how severe the symptoms are.</li></ul><p>One out of every 200 women may experien​ce a severe form of nausea and vomiting called hyperemesis gravidarum. The symptoms of this condition may include: </p> <ul> <li>persistent vomiting </li> <li>dehydration and malnutrition </li> <li>very high ketone levels in the body </li> <li>electrolyte disturbances </li> <li>weight loss of more than 5% of body weight </li></ul> <p>Hyperemesis gravidarum is more common in first-time mothers, women who are carrying more than one baby, and women who have had this condition in previous pregnancies. </p> <h2>What causes nausea and vomiting in pregnancy?</h2> <p>Many pregnant women experience nausea in response to specific odours. They may develop aversions to certain foods. Some scientists think that nausea and vomiting in pregnancy may be nature’s way of protecting the baby – it makes the woman stay away from substances that could be harmful to the pregnancy. </p> <p>The high levels of hormones circulating in the pregnant woman’s body are thought to contribute to nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. In the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) builds up in the woman’s body and is excreted in her urine. This is the hormone that is tested to determine whether a woman is pregnant. There appears to be a relationship between the level of hCG and the intensity of a woman’s nausea; they both tend to peak around the same time in pregnancy. </p> <p>Nausea and vomiting may also be associated with problems in the mother’s gastrointestinal tract, or infection with a bacterium known as <em>Helicobacter pylori</em>. Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy have also been linked with a deficiency of vitamin B6 and other B vitamins. </p> <h2>Do nausea and vomiting have adverse effects in pregnancy?</h2> <p>Nausea and vomiting during pregnancy are usually limited to the pregnancy itself. Hyperemesis gravidarum does not appear to have an adverse effect on the outcome of pregnancy or the baby’s health as long as the mother can keep hydrated. In fact, data from 11 studies have shown that nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is associated with a lower risk of miscarriage. </p> <p>In any case, if you have severe morning sickness, your doctor should rule out other potentially serious causes. These could include gastrointestinal disorders, genitourinary tract disorders such as kidney stones, certain metabolic disorders, neurological disorders such as migraine headaches or tumours, or drug toxicities. You may require an ultrasound to help rule out disorders of the gallbladder, liver, or kidney. </p> <p>Although women who have uncomplicated nausea and vomiting during pregnancy have normal pregnancy outcomes, hyperemesis gravidarum brings with it increased health risks to the mother. These risks include rupture of the esophagus, tears in the membrane that connects the esophagus to the stomach, tearing of the spleen, and problems with the lungs. </p> <h2>How are nausea and vomiting in pregnancy treated?</h2> <p>The treatment of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy depends on how severe the symptoms are. For mild nausea and vomiting, initial treatment usually consists of dietary changes. Try these tips: </p> <ul> <li>Eat frequent, small meals. </li> <li>Avoid smells and food textures that cause nausea. </li> <li>Eat foods that are bland tasting, high in carbohydrates, and low in fat. </li> <li>Salty foods such as crackers and potato chips are best tolerated in the morning. </li> <li>Sour liquids such as lemonade are better tolerated than water. </li> <li>Try eating ginger in the form of tea or in capsule form. </li></ul> <p>For more severe nausea and vomiting, including hyperemesis gravidarum, drugs may be needed to reduce the symptoms. One drug, called doxylamine succinate/pyridoxine hydrochloride, is considered to be safe in pregnancy, and has been approved in Canada for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Some pregnant women find that vitamin B6 is helpful as a treatment for nausea.</p> <p>If your nausea and vomiting are so severe that you are unable to keep liquids down, you may require intravenous fluids in the hospital. If you continue to vomit and lose weight despite aggressive treatment with the above therapies, you may need to receive nutrients through a feeding tube or intravenously. </p> <p>For more information, see the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada's patient education pamphlet on <a href="http://www.sogc.org/health/pdf/OBS-Nausea_e.pdf" target="_blank">Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy</a>. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/nausea_and_vomiting.jpgNausea and vomiting

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