AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Kidney biopsy using image guidanceKKidney biopsy using image guidanceKidney biopsy using image guidanceEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)KidneysKidneysProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-08-04T04:00:00ZMichelle Cote BScN RN;Dalia Bozic MN, RN(EC), NP-PHC;Joao Amaral, MD8.2000000000000062.90000000000001367.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what a kidney biopsy is and why it is done. Also find information about what will happen to your child before, during and after the procedure.<br></p><h2>What are the kidneys?</h2><p>The kidneys filter waste products from the blood and create urine. They are a pair of organs that are usually located in your child's back, one on each side of the spine, near the bottom of the rib cage. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Kidney </span><span class="asset-image-title">location</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/kidney_location_front_side_EN.png" alt="A front view and side view of a girl's rib cage, kidney and bladder" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Most</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> people have two kidneys, one on each side of the spine. They are found just under the rib cage towards the back of the body.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>What is a kidney biopsy?</h2><p>A kidney biopsy is a procedure where a doctor takes a tiny piece of kidney tissue using a special needle. The tissue is examined under a microscope in the laboratory. The biopsy is done using image guidance by an interventional radiologist.</p><h2>Why is a kidney biopsy done?</h2><p>A kidney biopsy can help your doctor determine your child’s cause of illness. It can also help doctors learn about how your child’s illness is changing.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A kidney biopsy is a procedure where an interventional radiologist takes a tiny piece of kidney tissue through a special needle, using ultrasound guidance, to be examined under a microscope.</li><li>Kidney biopsies are usually considered low-risk procedures.</li><li>If you see bright red bleeding in your child's urine, call your child's doctor right away.<br></li><li>If you live more than one hour away from the hospital, you will need to stay nearby overnight.</li></ul><h2>On the day of the kidney biopsy</h2><p>Arrive at the hospital two hours before the planned time of your child’s procedure. Once you are checked in, your child will be dressed in a hospital gown, weighed and assessed by a nurse. You will also be able to speak to the interventional radiologist who will be doing the kidney biopsy and the nurse or anaesthetist who will be giving your child medication to make them comfortable for the procedure.</p><p>During the kidney biopsy you will be asked to wait in the surgical waiting area.</p><h2>Your child will have medicine for pain</h2><p>It is important that your child is as comfortable as possible for the procedure. They may be given <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">local anaesthesia</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a>. The type of medicine that your child will have for the procedure will depend on your child’s condition.</p><h2>How a kidney biopsy is done</h2><p>Your child’s kidneys are located in their back area, usually one on either side. For the biopsy, your child will be lying on their stomach. The interventional radiologist uses ultrasound to view the kidneys. Local anaesthetic is then injected into the skin to numb the biopsy area. Then, while watching the kidney using the ultrasound, the interventional radiologist passes a special thin needle into one of the kidneys to get samples. Usually two or three samples are taken.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Kidney biopsy</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/kidney_biopsy_EN.jpg" alt="A view of the back of the rib cage and kidneys of a girl on her back with a biopsy needle inserted into her left kidney" /> </figure> <p>The samples are about 2 to 3 centimeters (1 inch) long, and look like a piece of thread. These kidney samples are then sent to the lab for examination.</p><p>You child will usually not need any stitches. A small bandage is placed over the biopsy site.</p><p>A kidney biopsy usually takes 45 minutes to one hour.</p><h2>If your child has had a kidney transplant</h2><p>If your child has had a kidney transplant they will lie on their back for the biopsy because the transplanted kidney is located closer to the front of the abdomen. The biopsy procedure is the same as described above.</p><p>A kidney biopsy from a transplanted kidney will usually take 45 minutes to one hour.</p><h2>After the kidney biopsy</h2><p>Once the kidney biopsy is complete, your child will be moved to the recovery area. The interventional radiologist will come and talk to you about the details of the procedure. As soon as your child starts to wake up, a nurse will come and get you.</p><h2>Recovery in hospital</h2><p>Your child will need to lie in bed for approximately eight hours after the biopsy. There will be a sandbag placed under your child’s back to apply pressure to the biopsy site. This helps to prevent the site from bleeding. If your child has had a kidney transplant, the sandbag will be placed on your child’s abdomen.</p> <p>If there is no blood in the urine and no bleeding from the biopsy site after two hours, the head of your child’s bed may be raised slightly.<br></p><h2>Going home</h2><p>Most children who have a kidney biopsy go home the same day. This is usually eight hours after the biopsy.</p><p>Your child will be observed closely for these eight hours before being discharged home. Your child will have a blood test about six hours after the biopsy to identify any changes in blood levels. If there are any concerns that there may be bleeding, an ultrasound may be ordered. Your child may have to stay on bed rest or be admitted overnight for further observation if your doctor feels it necessary.</p><p>If you live more than one hour away from the hospital, you will need to stay nearby overnight.</p><p>For more details on how to care for your child after a kidney biopsy, please see: <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1238&language=English">Kidney biopsy: Caring for your child at home after the procedure</a>.</p><h2>Visiting the clinic before the procedure</h2><p>Your child may have a clinic visit with the interventional radiologist before the procedure. During the visit you should expect:</p><ul><li>A health assessment to make sure your child is healthy and that it is safe to have <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3001&language=English">local anaesthesia</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1260&language=English">sedation</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> and to go ahead with the procedure.</li><li>An overview of the procedure, and a review of the consent form with an interventional radiologist.</li><li>A quick ultrasound of the kidneys; the area where the biopsy will be taken will be marked with a semi-permanent marker.</li><li>Blood work.</li></ul><h2>Giving consent before the procedure</h2><p>Before the procedure, the interventional radiologist will go over how and why the procedure is done, as well as the potential benefits and risks. They will also discuss what will be done to reduce these risks, and will help you weigh any benefits against the risks. It is important that you understand all of the potential risks and benefits of the kidney biopsy and that all of your questions are answered. If you agree to the procedure, you can give consent for treatment by signing the consent form. A parent or legal guardian must sign the consent form for young children. The procedure will not be done unless you give your consent.</p><h2>How to prepare your child for the procedure</h2><p>Before any treatment, it is important to talk to your child about what will happen. When talking to your child, use words they can understand. Let your child know that medicines will be given to make them feel comfortable during the procedure.</p><p>Children feel less anxious and scared when they know what to expect. Children also feel less worried when they see their parents are calm and supportive. </p><h2>If your child becomes ill within two days before the procedure</h2><p>It is important that your child is healthy on the day of the procedure. If your child starts to feel unwell or has a fever within two days before the kidney biopsy, let your doctor know. Your child’s procedure may need to be rebooked.</p><h2>Food, drink and medicines before the procedure</h2><ul><li>Your child’s stomach must be empty before sedation or general anaesthetic.</li><li>If your child has special needs during fasting, talk to your doctor to make a plan.</li><li>Your child can take their regular morning medicine with a sip of water two hours before the procedure.</li><li>Medicines such as <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=129&language=English">enoxaparin</a> may increase the risk of bleeding. Do not give these to your child before the procedure unless they have been cleared first by their doctor and the interventional radiologist.<br></li></ul><p>At SickKids, the interventional radiologists work in the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/diagnosticimaging/what-we-do/image-guided-therapy/index.html">Department of Diagnositic Imaging – Division of Image Guided Therapy (IGT)</a>. You can call the IGT clinic at (416) 813-6054 and speak to the clinic nurse during working hours (8:00 to 15:00) or leave a message with the IGT clinic nurse.</p><p>For more information on fasting see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/Eating-guidelines/index.html">Eating and drinking before surgery</a>.</p><p>For more information on preparing your child for their procedure see <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/VisitingSickKids/Coming-for-surgery/index.html">Coming for surgery</a>.</p>
Biopsie rénale au moyen de la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)BBiopsie rénale au moyen de la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)Kidney biopsy using image guided therapy (IGT)FrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)KidneysKidneysProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-30T05:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN, BScN;Bairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.00000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Vous apprendrez ce qui se passera pendant la biopsie rénale de votre enfant et comment prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison.</p><h2>Que sont les reins?</h2><p>Les reins sont des organes qui filtrent les déchets du sang et créent l'urine. Ce sont une paire d'organes habituellement situés dans le dos de votre enfant, à raison d'un de chaque côté de la colonne vertébrale, au-dessous de la cage thoracique.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Emplacement des reins</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Kidneys_location_female_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="L'identification de la cage thoracique, les reins et la colonne vertébrale dans une fille" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">La plupart des gens ont deux reins, un de chaque côté de la colonne vertébrale. Ils se situent juste en dessous de la cage thoracique, vers l'arrière du corps.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Qu'est-ce qu'une biopsie rénale?</h2><p>Une biopsie rénale est une intervention où le médecin prélève un petit morceau de tissu rénal au moyen d'une aiguille spéciale. Le tissu est examiné sous un microscope dans le laboratoire, pour déterminer quel est le problème. </p><p>La biopsie est faite au moyen d'une thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI).</p><h2>Qu'est-ce que la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)?</h2><p>La TGI désigne les interventions faites par les radiologues d'intervention pour diagnostiquer et traiter les patients. La TGI est aussi le nom du département qui fait ces interventions. </p><p>Ces médecins utilisent un équipement spécial de visualisation, comme la radiographie par rayons X, l'échographie, la tomographie assistée par ordinateur (TAO) ou l'imagerie par résonnance magnétique (IRM) pour effectuer les interventions qui auraient pu auparavant nécessiter une opération traditionnelle. </p><h3>Consentement avant l'intervention</h3><p>Le radiologue passera en revue avec vous un formulaire de consentement qui décrit les risques potentiels de l'intervention. Vous pourrez poser vos questions, et si vous acceptez les conditions et vous sentez à l'aise, vous pouvez consentir au traitement. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une biopsie rénale est une intervention pendant laquelle un médecin prélève un petit morceau de tissu rénal au moyen d'unea aiguille spéciale.</li> <li>Le tissu est ensuite examiné pour voir quel est le problème avec les reins de votre enfant. </li> <li>Soyez honnête et dites à votre enfant à quoi s'attendre. Les enfants sont moins nerveux et ont moins peur quand ils savent à quoi s'attendre.</li> <li>Si vous voyez du sang rouge clair dans les urines de votre enfant, appelez le médecin immédiatement.</li> </ul><h2>À quel moment appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Téléphonez à votre spécialiste ou au département de TGI, ou rendez-vous aux services d'urgence les plus près immédiatement si votre enfant a : </p> <ul> <li>une fièvre de plus de 38°C (100.4°F); </li> <li>des vomissements qui ne cessent pas;</li> <li>une douleur intense;</li> <li>un saignement ou une enflure autour du site de biopsie; </li> <li>du sang rouge clair dans les urines;</li> <li>des étourdissements et une pâleur;</li> <li>le ventre enflé;</li> <li>une faiblesse généralisée.</li> </ul> <h2>Qui appeler en cas de problème</h2> <p>Si vous avez des inquiétudes, appelez la clinique de TGI et demandez à parler à une infirmière, pendant les heures ouvrables. </p> <p>Si vous êtes inquiet hors heures oubrables, consultez votre médecin ou rendez-vous à aux services d'urgence locaux. S'il y a du sang rouge clair dans les urines de votre enfant pendant les deux semaines qui suivent la biopsie, appelez immédiatement. Demandez le médecin de garde ou votre spécialiste. </p><h2>Le matin de l'intervention</h2> <p>À son arrivée, votre enfant se verra poser une IV. Une petite quantité de crème anesthésiante sera posée sur l'endroit marqué, à moins que votre enfant ne reçoive un anesthésique général. </p> <h2>Comment se déroule une biopsie rénale</h2> <p>Pour la biopsie, l'enfant sera couché sur le ventre. Les reins de votre enfant sont dans le dos, habituellement un de chaque côté. Le radiologue d'intervention utilise un échographe pour voir où se situent les reins. </p> <p>Le radiologue dirige l'aiguille vers un des reins et prélève un échantillon qui est si petit qu'il ressemble à des bouts de corde. Habituellement, deux échantillons suffisent. Si le laboratoire a besoin d'autres échantillons, le radiologue en prendra d'autres. Votre enfant ne devrait pas avoir besoin de points. Les échantillons sont envoyés au laboratoire, où ils seront analysés. </p> <p>L'intervention dure 45 minutes à une heure.</p> <h3>Si votre enfant a subi une greffe de rein</h3> <p>Si votre enfant a subi une greffe de rein, il devra se coucher sur le dos pour l'intervention, parce que le rein greffé se trouve dans le ventre. Mis à part ce détail, l'intervention est la même que pour un enfant qui n'a pas subi de greffe. </p> <h2>On vous demandera d'attendre dans la chambre de votre enfant ou dans la salle d'attente</h2> <p>Pendant l'intervention, on vous demandera d'attendre dans la chambre de votre enfant ou dans la salle d'attente. Quand le traitement sera terminé et quand votre enfant commencera à se réveiller, vous pourrez aller le joindre. Le radiologue vous parlera après l'intervention.</p><h2>Après la biopsie</h2> <h3>Rétablissement</h3> <p>Après la biopsie, votre enfant devra se coucher sur le dos, sur un sac de sable placé où la biopsie a été faite. Cela aide à empêcher le site de saigner. Si le rein a été greffé, le sac sera placé sur le ventre. Votre enfant aura un pansement à l'endroit de la biopsie. </p> <p>S'il n'y a pas de sang dans les urines et si le site ne saigne pas après deux heures, la tête du lit de votre enfant pourra être légèrement élevée.</p> <h3>Soulagement de la douleur</h3> <p>Certains enfants éprouvent un léger inconfort à l'endroit de la biopsie pendant les premières jours. Si cela se produit, on donnera des médicaments contre la douleur à votre enfant. </p> <h2>Retour à la maison</h2> <p>La plupart des enfants qui ont eu une biopsie rénale retournent à la maison le même jour. Si le médecin de votre enfant a pris les mesures nécessaires, votre enfant pourra retourner à la maison quand il sera bien réveillé et dans un état stable. Le plus souvent, cela se produit environ huit heures après la biopsie. </p> <p>Nous observerons votre enfant pour veiller à ce que tout aille bien avant qu'il ne retourne à la maison. Votre enfant subira une analyse sanguine environ six heures après la biopsie pour détecter tout saignement. S'il y a du sang dans les urines, ou si le niveau d'hémoglobine chute, une échographie pourrait être demandée. Votre enfant pourrait devoir rester alité ou être admis pour la nuit en observation. Si vous habitez à plus d'une heure de l'hôpital, vous pourriez devoir loger à proximité pour la nuit. </p><h2>Consultation à la clinique avant l'intervention</h2> <p>Pour toutes les biopsies non urgentes, l'enfant assistera à une consultation en clinique au département de TGI un à deux jours avant l'intervention.</p> <p>Voici les examens qui seront faits:</p> <ul> <li>Une évaluation pour vérifier l'état de santé de votre enfant et si le fait de lui donner un sédatif ou un anesthésique général est sans danger. </li> <li>Une échographie rapide des reins. on marquera le dos de votre enfant avec un marqueur semi-permanent.</li> <li>Des analyses sanguines.</li> </ul> <h2>Comment préparer votre enfant à l'intervention</h2> <p>Avant tout traitement, il importe de parler à votre enfant de ce qui se passera dans des termes qu'il peut comprendre. Il importe d'être honnête. Dites à votre enfant qu'il recevra des médicaments qui l'aideront à être à l'aise pendant l'intervention. Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent à quoi s'attendre. </p> <h2>Votre enfant prendra des médicaments anti-douleur</h2> <p>On administre un médicament appelé anesthésique aux enfants pour des traitements qui peuvent être effrayants, inconfortables ou douloureux. Ce genre de médicament se classe en trois catégories : </p> <ul> <li>Anesthésie locale</li> <li>Sédatif </li> <li>Anesthésie générale</li> </ul> <h3>Anesthésie locale</h3> <p>Il s'agit d'un médicament qui endort une région déterminée et est injecté au moyen d'une très mince aiguille à travers la peau. On s'en sert pour les enfants plus âgés et coopératifs qui choisissent de faire l'intervention de cette manière. Votre enfant n'a pas besoin de préparation spéciale pour un anesthésique local.</p> <h3>Sédation</h3> <p>La sédation est réalisée avec un sédatif. C'est un médicament qui aide votre enfant à se détendre pendant l'intervention. Il est utilisé pour la plupart des enfants en bonne santé, qui n'ont pas de maladie grave et sont en mesure de coopérer et qui subissent une courte intervention. Un anesthésique local est utilisé avec le sédatif.</p> <p>On installera une aiguille intraveineuse (IV) dans la main de votre enfant. Ensuite, l'infirmière ou le médecin donnera le sédatif à votre enfant par l'IV. Le médicament pourrait ou non endormir complètement votre enfant. L'infirmière s'assurera que votre enfant est à l'aise en tout temps.</p> <h3>Anesthésie générale</h3> <p>L'anesthésie générale peut être utilisée pour les enfants de moins d'un an, si des échantillons doivent être prélevés, si votre enfant a une affection spéciale ou si le médecin estime que cela vaut mieux. Votre enfant pourrait avoir besoin d'un tube pour respirer. </p> <h3>Aliments, boissons et médicaments avant l'intervention</h3> <p>L'estomac de votre enfant doit être vide pendant et après l'administration du sédatif ou de l'anesthésie générale. Un estomac vide réduit les risques de vomissement et d'étouffement avec les aliments dans l'estomac. </p> <p>La préparation pour la sédation ou l'anesthésie générale est la même :</p> <ul> <li>Votre enfant ne peut manger d'aliments solides ni boire de lait pendant huit heures avant l'intervention, ni même de gomme à mâcher ou de bonbons.</li> <li>Votre enfant peut boire des liquides clairs comme du jus de pomme et du soda au gingembre jusqu'à deux heures avant l'intervention.</li> <li>Si vous allaitez votre enfant, il peut boire du lait maternel jusqu'à quatre heures avant l'intervention.</li> <li>Donnez à votre enfant ses médicaments habituels du matin avec uniquement une gorgée d'eau deux heures avant l'intervention.</li> <li>Des médicaments comme l'ASA (aspirine), des anti-inflammatoires comme le naproxène ou l'ibuprofène (Advil) et des médicaments qui fluidifient le sang comme la warfarine (Coumadin) augmentent le risque de saignement. Ne donnez pas ces médicaments à votre enfant avant l'intervention. Si votre enfant prend ces médicaments, parlez-en à votre médecin.</li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant a des besoins spéciaux pendant le jeûne, votre médecin vous dira quoi faire avant l'intervention. </p><h2>À SickKids</h2> <p>Le jour qui suit la biopsie, appelez la clinique de TGI, au 416-813-7654, poste 1804, avant 10 h pour nous dire comment va votre enfant. Si l'infirmière ne peut répondre, veuillez laisser un message et le numéro de téléphone où on peut vous joindre.</p>

 

 

Biopsie rénale au moyen de la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)35.0000000000000Biopsie rénale au moyen de la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)Kidney biopsy using image guided therapy (IGT)BFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)KidneysKidneysProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-30T05:00:00ZCandice Sockett, RN, BScN;Bairbre Connolly, MB, BCH, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.00000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Vous apprendrez ce qui se passera pendant la biopsie rénale de votre enfant et comment prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison.</p><h2>Que sont les reins?</h2><p>Les reins sont des organes qui filtrent les déchets du sang et créent l'urine. Ce sont une paire d'organes habituellement situés dans le dos de votre enfant, à raison d'un de chaque côté de la colonne vertébrale, au-dessous de la cage thoracique.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Emplacement des reins</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Kidneys_location_female_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="L'identification de la cage thoracique, les reins et la colonne vertébrale dans une fille" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">La plupart des gens ont deux reins, un de chaque côté de la colonne vertébrale. Ils se situent juste en dessous de la cage thoracique, vers l'arrière du corps.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Qu'est-ce qu'une biopsie rénale?</h2><p>Une biopsie rénale est une intervention où le médecin prélève un petit morceau de tissu rénal au moyen d'une aiguille spéciale. Le tissu est examiné sous un microscope dans le laboratoire, pour déterminer quel est le problème. </p><p>La biopsie est faite au moyen d'une thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI).</p><h2>Qu'est-ce que la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)?</h2><p>La TGI désigne les interventions faites par les radiologues d'intervention pour diagnostiquer et traiter les patients. La TGI est aussi le nom du département qui fait ces interventions. </p><p>Ces médecins utilisent un équipement spécial de visualisation, comme la radiographie par rayons X, l'échographie, la tomographie assistée par ordinateur (TAO) ou l'imagerie par résonnance magnétique (IRM) pour effectuer les interventions qui auraient pu auparavant nécessiter une opération traditionnelle. </p><h3>Consentement avant l'intervention</h3><p>Le radiologue passera en revue avec vous un formulaire de consentement qui décrit les risques potentiels de l'intervention. Vous pourrez poser vos questions, et si vous acceptez les conditions et vous sentez à l'aise, vous pouvez consentir au traitement. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Une biopsie rénale est une intervention pendant laquelle un médecin prélève un petit morceau de tissu rénal au moyen d'unea aiguille spéciale.</li> <li>Le tissu est ensuite examiné pour voir quel est le problème avec les reins de votre enfant. </li> <li>Soyez honnête et dites à votre enfant à quoi s'attendre. Les enfants sont moins nerveux et ont moins peur quand ils savent à quoi s'attendre.</li> <li>Si vous voyez du sang rouge clair dans les urines de votre enfant, appelez le médecin immédiatement.</li> </ul><h2>Prendre soin de l'enfant à la maison</h2> <h3>Soins du pansement</h3> <p>Vous pouvez enlever le pansement 24 heures après l'intervention. Si le pansement se mouille ou se salit avant les 24 heures, enlevez-le et remplacez-le par un pansement propre. </p> <h3>Bains</h3> <p>Votre enfant peut se laver dans le bain ou la douche le jour qui suit la biopsie.</p> <h3>Repas</h3> <p>Une fois à la maison, vous pouvez donner à votre enfant des liquides comme du jus de fruit ou de la soupe. S'il les tolère bien, il peut recommencer à manger normalement. </p> <h3>Soulagement de la douleur</h3> <p>Vous pouvez donner de l'acétaminophène (Tylenol) à votre enfant au besoin. Ne lui donnez pas de médicaments qui fluidifient le sang, comme l'ibuprofène (Advil, Motrin), l'AAS (aspirine), ou la warfarine. Demandez d'abord à une infirmière ou à un médecin. </p> <h3>Activité</h3> <p>Après la biopsie, votre enfant devra rester calme et ne pas aller à l'école ou à la garderie, et éviter l'activité physique pendant les deux premiers jours (48 heures). Après cela, il pourra retourner à l'école. </p> <p>Votre enfant doit éviter ce qui suit pendant deux semaines :</p> <ul> <li>sports de contact;</li> <li>gymnastique avec barres parallèles;</li> <li>plongée </li> <li>bicyclette</li> <li>patin à roues alignées </li> <li>hockey </li> <li>équitation</li> <li>natation </li> </ul><h2>À quel moment appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Téléphonez à votre spécialiste ou au département de TGI, ou rendez-vous aux services d'urgence les plus près immédiatement si votre enfant a : </p> <ul> <li>une fièvre de plus de 38°C (100.4°F); </li> <li>des vomissements qui ne cessent pas;</li> <li>une douleur intense;</li> <li>un saignement ou une enflure autour du site de biopsie; </li> <li>du sang rouge clair dans les urines;</li> <li>des étourdissements et une pâleur;</li> <li>le ventre enflé;</li> <li>une faiblesse généralisée.</li> </ul> <h2>Qui appeler en cas de problème</h2> <p>Si vous avez des inquiétudes, appelez la clinique de TGI et demandez à parler à une infirmière, pendant les heures ouvrables. </p> <p>Si vous êtes inquiet hors heures oubrables, consultez votre médecin ou rendez-vous à aux services d'urgence locaux. S'il y a du sang rouge clair dans les urines de votre enfant pendant les deux semaines qui suivent la biopsie, appelez immédiatement. Demandez le médecin de garde ou votre spécialiste. </p><h2>Le matin de l'intervention</h2> <p>À son arrivée, votre enfant se verra poser une IV. Une petite quantité de crème anesthésiante sera posée sur l'endroit marqué, à moins que votre enfant ne reçoive un anesthésique général. </p> <h2>Comment se déroule une biopsie rénale</h2> <p>Pour la biopsie, l'enfant sera couché sur le ventre. Les reins de votre enfant sont dans le dos, habituellement un de chaque côté. Le radiologue d'intervention utilise un échographe pour voir où se situent les reins. </p> <p>Le radiologue dirige l'aiguille vers un des reins et prélève un échantillon qui est si petit qu'il ressemble à des bouts de corde. Habituellement, deux échantillons suffisent. Si le laboratoire a besoin d'autres échantillons, le radiologue en prendra d'autres. Votre enfant ne devrait pas avoir besoin de points. Les échantillons sont envoyés au laboratoire, où ils seront analysés. </p> <p>L'intervention dure 45 minutes à une heure.</p> <h3>Si votre enfant a subi une greffe de rein</h3> <p>Si votre enfant a subi une greffe de rein, il devra se coucher sur le dos pour l'intervention, parce que le rein greffé se trouve dans le ventre. Mis à part ce détail, l'intervention est la même que pour un enfant qui n'a pas subi de greffe. </p> <h2>On vous demandera d'attendre dans la chambre de votre enfant ou dans la salle d'attente</h2> <p>Pendant l'intervention, on vous demandera d'attendre dans la chambre de votre enfant ou dans la salle d'attente. Quand le traitement sera terminé et quand votre enfant commencera à se réveiller, vous pourrez aller le joindre. Le radiologue vous parlera après l'intervention.</p><h2>Après la biopsie</h2> <h3>Rétablissement</h3> <p>Après la biopsie, votre enfant devra se coucher sur le dos, sur un sac de sable placé où la biopsie a été faite. Cela aide à empêcher le site de saigner. Si le rein a été greffé, le sac sera placé sur le ventre. Votre enfant aura un pansement à l'endroit de la biopsie. </p> <p>S'il n'y a pas de sang dans les urines et si le site ne saigne pas après deux heures, la tête du lit de votre enfant pourra être légèrement élevée.</p> <h3>Soulagement de la douleur</h3> <p>Certains enfants éprouvent un léger inconfort à l'endroit de la biopsie pendant les premières jours. Si cela se produit, on donnera des médicaments contre la douleur à votre enfant. </p> <h2>Retour à la maison</h2> <p>La plupart des enfants qui ont eu une biopsie rénale retournent à la maison le même jour. Si le médecin de votre enfant a pris les mesures nécessaires, votre enfant pourra retourner à la maison quand il sera bien réveillé et dans un état stable. Le plus souvent, cela se produit environ huit heures après la biopsie. </p> <p>Nous observerons votre enfant pour veiller à ce que tout aille bien avant qu'il ne retourne à la maison. Votre enfant subira une analyse sanguine environ six heures après la biopsie pour détecter tout saignement. S'il y a du sang dans les urines, ou si le niveau d'hémoglobine chute, une échographie pourrait être demandée. Votre enfant pourrait devoir rester alité ou être admis pour la nuit en observation. Si vous habitez à plus d'une heure de l'hôpital, vous pourriez devoir loger à proximité pour la nuit. </p><h2>Consultation à la clinique avant l'intervention</h2> <p>Pour toutes les biopsies non urgentes, l'enfant assistera à une consultation en clinique au département de TGI un à deux jours avant l'intervention.</p> <p>Voici les examens qui seront faits:</p> <ul> <li>Une évaluation pour vérifier l'état de santé de votre enfant et si le fait de lui donner un sédatif ou un anesthésique général est sans danger. </li> <li>Une échographie rapide des reins. on marquera le dos de votre enfant avec un marqueur semi-permanent.</li> <li>Des analyses sanguines.</li> </ul> <h2>Comment préparer votre enfant à l'intervention</h2> <p>Avant tout traitement, il importe de parler à votre enfant de ce qui se passera dans des termes qu'il peut comprendre. Il importe d'être honnête. Dites à votre enfant qu'il recevra des médicaments qui l'aideront à être à l'aise pendant l'intervention. Les enfants sont moins anxieux et ont moins peur quand ils savent à quoi s'attendre. </p> <h2>Votre enfant prendra des médicaments anti-douleur</h2> <p>On administre un médicament appelé anesthésique aux enfants pour des traitements qui peuvent être effrayants, inconfortables ou douloureux. Ce genre de médicament se classe en trois catégories : </p> <ul> <li>Anesthésie locale</li> <li>Sédatif </li> <li>Anesthésie générale</li> </ul> <h3>Anesthésie locale</h3> <p>Il s'agit d'un médicament qui endort une région déterminée et est injecté au moyen d'une très mince aiguille à travers la peau. On s'en sert pour les enfants plus âgés et coopératifs qui choisissent de faire l'intervention de cette manière. Votre enfant n'a pas besoin de préparation spéciale pour un anesthésique local.</p> <h3>Sédation</h3> <p>La sédation est réalisée avec un sédatif. C'est un médicament qui aide votre enfant à se détendre pendant l'intervention. Il est utilisé pour la plupart des enfants en bonne santé, qui n'ont pas de maladie grave et sont en mesure de coopérer et qui subissent une courte intervention. Un anesthésique local est utilisé avec le sédatif.</p> <p>On installera une aiguille intraveineuse (IV) dans la main de votre enfant. Ensuite, l'infirmière ou le médecin donnera le sédatif à votre enfant par l'IV. Le médicament pourrait ou non endormir complètement votre enfant. L'infirmière s'assurera que votre enfant est à l'aise en tout temps.</p> <h3>Anesthésie générale</h3> <p>L'anesthésie générale peut être utilisée pour les enfants de moins d'un an, si des échantillons doivent être prélevés, si votre enfant a une affection spéciale ou si le médecin estime que cela vaut mieux. Votre enfant pourrait avoir besoin d'un tube pour respirer. </p> <h3>Aliments, boissons et médicaments avant l'intervention</h3> <p>L'estomac de votre enfant doit être vide pendant et après l'administration du sédatif ou de l'anesthésie générale. Un estomac vide réduit les risques de vomissement et d'étouffement avec les aliments dans l'estomac. </p> <p>La préparation pour la sédation ou l'anesthésie générale est la même :</p> <ul> <li>Votre enfant ne peut manger d'aliments solides ni boire de lait pendant huit heures avant l'intervention, ni même de gomme à mâcher ou de bonbons.</li> <li>Votre enfant peut boire des liquides clairs comme du jus de pomme et du soda au gingembre jusqu'à deux heures avant l'intervention.</li> <li>Si vous allaitez votre enfant, il peut boire du lait maternel jusqu'à quatre heures avant l'intervention.</li> <li>Donnez à votre enfant ses médicaments habituels du matin avec uniquement une gorgée d'eau deux heures avant l'intervention.</li> <li>Des médicaments comme l'ASA (aspirine), des anti-inflammatoires comme le naproxène ou l'ibuprofène (Advil) et des médicaments qui fluidifient le sang comme la warfarine (Coumadin) augmentent le risque de saignement. Ne donnez pas ces médicaments à votre enfant avant l'intervention. Si votre enfant prend ces médicaments, parlez-en à votre médecin.</li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant a des besoins spéciaux pendant le jeûne, votre médecin vous dira quoi faire avant l'intervention. </p><h2>Risque d'une biopsie des reins avant l'intervention</h2> <p>Toutes les interventions comportent des risques, qui s'échelonnent de faible à élevé. Les biopsies des reins sont habituellement des interventions à faible risque. Bien que faibles, les risques liés à cette intervention dépendent largement de l'état de santé de votre enfant, de son âge et taille, et de tout autre problème que pourrait présenté votre enfant.</p> <p>Toute biopsie des reins comportent les risques suivants :</p> <ul> <li>Sang dans les urines </li> <li>Saignement autour des reins ou dans les reins</li> <li>Infection </li> <li>Atteinte de tout autre organe à proximité par l'aiguille </li> <li>Fuite d'urine par les reins</li> <li>Rupture de vaisseaux sanguins</li> <li>Connexion anormale entre les artères ou les veines du rein ou le système urinaire </li> <li>Échantillon insuffisant</li> <li>Décès: risque très minime</li> </ul> <p>Avant toute intervention, vos médecins vous aideront à peser les bienfaits de l'intervention par rapport aux risques qu'elle peut poser. </p><h2>À SickKids</h2> <p>Le jour qui suit la biopsie, appelez la clinique de TGI, au 416-813-7654, poste 1804, avant 10 h pour nous dire comment va votre enfant. Si l'infirmière ne peut répondre, veuillez laisser un message et le numéro de téléphone où on peut vous joindre.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Kidneys_location_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpgBiopsie rénale au moyen de la thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI)False

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.