Diabetes and pregnancyDDiabetes and pregnancyDiabetes and pregnancyEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000040.0000000000000996.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about diabetes and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that arises for the first time in pregnancy, is also discussed.</p><p>Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder where the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Diabetes is a common disease and its incidence is increasing. The main symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst and urination, weight loss, and the presence of too much sugar in the urine and blood. Sometimes, diabetes first arises during pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The different types of diabetes are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes.</li><li>Pregnancy in women with diabetes is considered high risk, therefore women with diabetes must take special care to manage their diabetes while pregnant.</li><li>Gestational diabetes is diabetes that first arises during pregnancy and can cause complications for the mother and unborn baby.</li> <li>Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future.</li></ul>
Diabète et grossesseDDiabète et grossesseDiabetes and pregnancyFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000040.0000000000000996.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur le diabète en cours de grossesse. Cette section fournit de l’information sur le diabète gestationnel, c’est-à-dire le diabète qui se déclare pour la première en cours de grossesse.</p><p>Le diabète est un trouble métabolique chronique qui se développe lorsque le pancréas ne secrète pas assez d’insuline, ou lorsque le corps n’utilise pas l’insuline sécrétée convenablement. Le diabète est une maladie commune et sa fréquence tend à augmenter. Le diabète se manifeste principalement par une soif et une miction excessives, une perte de poids et un excès de sucre dans l’urine et le sang. Le diabète gestationnel est le diabète qui se déclare pour la première fois au cours de la grossesse.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Le diabète de type 1, le diabète de type 2 et le diabète gestationnel sont les différents types de diabètes.</li> <li>La grossesse chez les femmes atteintes de diabète est considérée à haut risque, ce qui signifie que ces femmes doivent porter une attention particulière à la gestion de leur diabète lorsqu’elles sont enceintes.</li> <li>Le diabète gestationnel est un diabète qui survient au cours de la grossesse et qui peut entraîner des complications pour la mère et le fœtus.</li> <li>Les femmes atteintes de diabète gestationnel sont plus à risque de développer un diabète de type 2 éventuellement. </li></ul>

 

 

Diabetes and pregnancy361.000000000000Diabetes and pregnancyDiabetes and pregnancyDEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000040.0000000000000996.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about diabetes and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that arises for the first time in pregnancy, is also discussed.</p><p>Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder where the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Diabetes is a common disease and its incidence is increasing. The main symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst and urination, weight loss, and the presence of too much sugar in the urine and blood. Sometimes, diabetes first arises during pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The different types of diabetes are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes.</li><li>Pregnancy in women with diabetes is considered high risk, therefore women with diabetes must take special care to manage their diabetes while pregnant.</li><li>Gestational diabetes is diabetes that first arises during pregnancy and can cause complications for the mother and unborn baby.</li> <li>Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future.</li></ul><h2>Types of diabetes</h2> <p>There are different types of diabetes:</p> <ul> <li>type 1 diabetes, which begins at a young age and requires treatment with insulin injections </li> <li>type 2 diabetes, which may be caused by obesity, and which may be treated with dietary changes, medications, and sometimes insulin injections </li> <li>gestational diabetes, which is type 2 diabetes that arises during pregnancy, and is treated with dietary changes and sometimes insulin </li></ul> <p>Diabetes that is not properly controlled can lead to complications such as high blood pressure, poor circulation in the legs and feet, kidney disorders, eye conditions, and problems with the nerves. </p> <h2>Pre-existing diabetes and pregnancy</h2> <p>Pregnancy in women with diabetes is considered high-risk. If diabetes is not properly controlled during pregnancy, there is an increased chance of miscarriage, birth defects in the baby, and high blood pressure in the mother. However, with scrupulous medical guidance and self-care during pregnancy, these complications can be greatly reduced. If you have diabetes and you take excellent care of your body before and during pregnancy, you have a good chance of having a healthy baby. </p> <p>Whenever possible, women with type 2 diabetes should strive to get their diabetes under control before they become pregnant. Some oral medications for diabetes cause birth defects, and therefore all such medications should be discontinued before and during pregnancy. An insulin regimen is established instead. Folic acid is given at a dose of 1 mg per day ;before and during pregnancy, to help prevent birth defects. Any existing complications such as eye problems or kidney disorders should be evaluated. </p> <p>Pregnancy increases the risk of eye problems in women with diabetes. Women should have an eye examination before pregnancy, in the first trimester, and perhaps more times while pregnant, as well as within one year after childbirth. </p> <p>During pregnancy, meticulous blood sugar control is very important. Blood sugar needs to be regularly monitored by the pregnant woman at different times each day. Blood sugar that is too high can increase the risk of birth defects, and can also lead to a very large baby and complications during childbirth. Blood sugar that is too low can also be bad for the baby and may lead to seizures in the mother. </p> <p>Women with diabetes should seek nutritional counselling from a registered dietitian, to ensure there is adequate nutritional intake and appropriate weight gain. The diet is usually high in complex carbohydrates such as beans or whole grain bread, moderate in protein, low in cholesterol and fat, and free from sugary sweets. Dietary fibre is important. To maintain normal blood sugar levels, a certain amount of carbohydrates should be eaten in the morning and in the form of snacks. Eating regularly is essential and skipping meals is dangerous. If morning sickness is a problem, it may be easier to eat six to eight small, regularly spaced, and carefully planned meals instead of three large ones. If nausea and vomiting pose a problem, your doctor may need to adjust your insulin dose. </p> <p>During pregnancy, appropriate exercise such as brisk walking or swimming is also encouraged, unless there is a physical reason why a woman should not exercise. </p> <h2>Gestational diabetes</h2> <p>Gestational diabetes is diabetes that first arises during pregnancy. For the mother, gestational diabetes increases the risk of caesarean section and future type 2 diabetes. For the unborn baby, there are risks of high birth weight, trauma during childbirth, low blood sugar levels, respiratory distress, stillbirth, or death during childbirth. </p> <p>Most pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes in weeks 24 to 28 of pregnancy. However, if they have risk factors for diabetes, the doctor may be able to arrange for earlier screening. The risk factors for diabetes include: </p> <ul> <li>previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes </li> <li>previous delivery of a high birth weight infant </li> <li>member of the Aboriginal, Hispanic, south Asian, Asian, or African population </li> <li>age over 35 years </li> <li>obesity </li> <li>use of drugs called corticosteroids </li></ul> <p>Women with gestational diabetes need to monitor their blood glucose. This is done at least once a day by pricking the fingertip to obtain a drop of blood, and testing the blood with an electronic blood glucose meter. Women with gestational diabetes also need to follow a meal plan in much the same way as women with pre-existing diabetes. Their diet should be followed by a registered dietitian and appropriate exercise is encouraged. If dietary changes are not enough to bring the blood sugar to normal levels, daily insulin injections may be needed. Many oral medications for diabetes are harmful to the unborn baby and therefore are not used during pregnancy. </p> <p>Because diabetes in pregnancy can result in a high birth weight infant, the growth of the unborn baby may be monitored by ultrasound in the third trimester. A non-stress test or measurement of the amount of amniotic fluid may also be required to determine how well the baby is growing. </p> <p>High birth weight can lead to a complication called shoulder dystocia, where the shoulders of the baby get stuck in the birth canal during childbirth. As a result, the rates of caesarean section are higher in women with gestational diabetes. </p> <p>Gestational diabetes usually goes away after childbirth, unless the mother had undiagnosed diabetes prior to pregnancy. However, there is an increased risk that the mother will develop type 2 diabetes in the future. Women with gestational diabetes should have their blood sugar levels tested six weeks after childbirth and annually thereafter. Dietary changes that were adopted during pregnancy should be continued after childbirth, in an effort to prevent the development of future type 2 diabetes. </p> <p>When planning for future pregnancies, women with previous gestational diabetes need to make sure that their blood sugar levels are under control. Lifestyle modifications should be implemented if necessary, and folic acid should be taken in a dose of 1 mg per day to prevent birth defects. </p> <p>For more information about diabetes, see the <a href="/diabetes">Diabetes Resource Centre</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/diabetes_and_pregnancy.jpgDiabetes and pregnancy

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