Genital problemsGGenital problemsGenital problemsEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;Uterus;Ovaries;Penis;Scrotum;TesticleReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-10T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Andrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC10.000000000000046.0000000000000714.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the various genital abnormalities that can arise in a developing fetus during pregnancy. Answers from Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.<br></p><p>Some babies are born with congenital abnormalities, or birth defects, in their genital tract. These abnormalities form as the result of something going wrong with the development of the baby’s genital tract during pregnancy. It is important to keep in mind that these abnormalities are rare, and can sometimes be treated with surgery. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Genital tract abnormalities can occur in both boys and girls; they are usually rare and may sometimes be treated with surgery.</li> <li>Problems with sexual differentiation are a result of chromosomal issues. They can affect the gender of your child.</li></ul>
Troubles de l’appareil génitalTTroubles de l’appareil génitalGenital problemsFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;Uterus;Ovaries;Penis;Scrotum;TesticleReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-10T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Andrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC10.000000000000046.0000000000000714.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les anomalies génitales pouvant survenir pendant le développement du fœtus. Cette section contient des réponses fournies par les hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>Certains bébés naissent avec des malformations du tractus génital, que l’on appelle communément déficiences de naissance ou anomalies congénitales. Elles résultent d’un événement anormal qui s’est produit pendant le développement du tractus génital du bébé en gestation. Il est important de savoir que ces anomalies sont rares et qu’il est parfois possible de les corriger par voie de chirurgie. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Des anomalies de l’appareil génital peuvent survenir chez les garçons comme chez les filles; elles sont habituellement rares et peuvent parfois être traitées au moyen d’une intervention chirurgicale.</li> <li>Les problèmes liés à la différenciation sexuelle sont le résultat d’anomalies chromosomiques. Ils peuvent influencer le genre de votre enfant. </li></ul>

 

 

Genital problems376.000000000000Genital problemsGenital problemsGEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;Uterus;Ovaries;Penis;Scrotum;TesticleReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-10T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Andrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC10.000000000000046.0000000000000714.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the various genital abnormalities that can arise in a developing fetus during pregnancy. Answers from Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.<br></p><p>Some babies are born with congenital abnormalities, or birth defects, in their genital tract. These abnormalities form as the result of something going wrong with the development of the baby’s genital tract during pregnancy. It is important to keep in mind that these abnormalities are rare, and can sometimes be treated with surgery. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Genital tract abnormalities can occur in both boys and girls; they are usually rare and may sometimes be treated with surgery.</li> <li>Problems with sexual differentiation are a result of chromosomal issues. They can affect the gender of your child.</li></ul><h2>Genital tract abnormalities in boys</h2><h3>Undescended testes</h3><p>In normal pregnancy, the baby’s testes descend into the scrotum sometime before birth. However, sometimes one or both testes remain in the pelvic cavity and do not descend. This is called undescended testes or cryptorchism. An undescended testis cannot produce sperm because the sperm cells need a cool place like the scrotum in order to survive. Undescended testes are relatively common in newborn baby boys, and the testes usually move down into the scrotum in the first few months of life. If the testes do not descend by two years of age, surgery may be required. In some baby boys, treatment can be done with a hormone called hCG. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Undescended Testes</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Undescended_testes_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Testes normally develop in the abdomen and travel down to the scrotum before birth. Occasionally a testis may stop anywhere along this path from high in the abdomen to above the scrotum.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Hypospadias</h3><p>In boys with hypospadias, abnormal openings form in the urethra along the underside of the penis. This is a common and relatively mild condition that causes boys to need to sit when urinating. However, sometimes the condition leads to curvature of the penis, which can make intercourse difficult later in life. Hypospadias can be corrected with surgery within the first two years of life. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Hypospadias</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hypospadias_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Usually, the opening of the urethra, or meatus, is at the tip of the penis. In children with hypospadias the opening of the urethra can be located at various positions along the underside of the penis. The foreskin may not completely close over the head of the penis. The location of the urethral opening can range from just below the usual position on the glans to between or underneath the scrotum.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Congenital inguinal hernia</h3><p>Normally, the opening between the abdominal cavity and the scrotal sac closes after birth. If this passageway remains open, the intestinal loops may drop down into the scrotum. This is called a congenital inguinal hernia, and it is one of the most common reasons for an operation in infancy and childhood. </p><h3>Micropenis</h3><p>This is a very small penis, usually caused by hormonal problems. There may be problems with fertility when the child grows into adulthood. There is no cure for micropenis, but sometimes hormones can be used to stimulate the penis to grow. </p><h3>Episadias</h3><p>Normally, the opening to the urethra is at the tip of the penis in boys. However, in boys with episadias, the opening is near the top or side of the penis. Episadias is a very rare condition. Usually episadias is associated with another condition called exstrophy of the bladder, where the bladder and its related structures are not covered by the lower abdominal wall. </p><h2>Genital abnormalities in girls</h2><h3>Malformations or duplications of the mullerian system</h3><p>The mullerian system consists of the oviducts (the tubes that pass from the ovaries to the uterus), uterus, and upper vagina. Sometimes malformations can occur with any of these structures. Malformations can lead to obstructions in the mullerian system.</p><p>Duplications can also occur within the mullerian system. One example is duplication of the uterus. This can occur if certain ducts do not fuse properly during the development of the baby’s genital tract during pregnancy. In its least severe form, there is just a slight indentation in the top of the uterus. In its most extreme form, there are two separate uteruses, each with its own cervix. One uterus may be larger than the other. Problems might arise in puberty, when the products of menstruation may build-up in the abnormal uterus. </p><p>Surgery may be required to correct malformations or duplications of the mullerian system. However, if these malformations affect the sex organs only, surgery may be delayed until puberty. </p><h2>Problems with sexual differentiation</h2><h3>Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome</h3><p>This is when a baby has the chromosomal pattern of a boy but the outward appearance of a girl. This is because the baby does not have any receptors for male hormones, and therefore, any hormonally-dependent male structures do not develop. The vagina is short and there is no uterus. There are testes but no production of sperm. Most children born with this condition are not diagnosed until puberty. Testicular feminization syndrome is caused by a subtle hormone abnormality. </p><h3>Klinefelter syndrome</h3><p>Babies with Klinefelter syndrome have one or two extra sex chromosomes. These babies are always boys and, instead of having an XY chromosome pair, they have XXY or XXXY as their sex chromosomes. Usually, boys with Klinefelter syndrome are not diagnosed until puberty. The features of this condition include sterility, shrinkage of the testicles, and development of breasts. </p><h3>Turner syndrome</h3><p>These babies, always girls, lack one of their X chromosomes. The features of this condition include an absence of ovaries, short stature, a webbed neck, skeletal deformities, and a broad chest with widely spaced nipples. </p><h3>Intersex</h3><p>This extremely rare condition occurs when the baby has sexual characteristics of both genders. Some babies with this condition have both ovaries and testes. They usually have a uterus. Generally, their outer genitals are female, but the clitoris can be enlarged in some cases to look almost like a penis. Again, great care is needed in terms of treatment, and the decision to choose a gender for the child may be delayed. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/genital_problems_babies.jpgGenital problemsFalse

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