Fetal alcohol spectrum disorderFFetal alcohol spectrum disorderFetal alcohol spectrum disorderEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-10T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Margaret Linton, RN12.000000000000035.0000000000000431.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the symptoms and issues related to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Symptoms include problems with facial development.</p><p>Many women drink socially, and about half of all pregnancies are unplanned. Alcohol crosses the placental barrier readily and can easily enter into the unborn baby’s blood circulation. Babies who are exposed to alcohol during the early months of pregnancy may be at risk for a condition known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). About 1% of people living in Canada are affected by FASD. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Symptoms of FASD include low birth weight face and mouth deformities, delayed growth and hearing or vision problems.</li> <li>Children with FASD may have subtle cognitive or behavioural problems.</li> <li>To avoid FASD, if you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant, do not drink alcohol.</li></ul>
Ensemble des troubles causés par l’alcoolisation fœtaleEEnsemble des troubles causés par l’alcoolisation fœtaleFetal alcohol spectrum disorderFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-10T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Margaret Linton, RN12.000000000000035.0000000000000431.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les symptômes et les enjeux associés à l’ensemble des troubles causés par l’alcoolisation fœtale. Les anomalies faciales font partie des symptômes.</p><p>De multiples femmes consomment de l’alcool de manière sociale et près de la moitié des grossesses ne sont pas planifiées. L’alcool traverse facilement la barrière placentaire et peut amplement s’introduire dans le sang du bébé en gestation. Les bébés exposés à l’alcool dans les premiers mois de la grossesse peuvent être affectés par ce que l’on appelle l’ensemble des troubles causés par l’alcoolisation fœtale (ETCAF). Près d’un pour cent de la population du Canada est touché par l’ETCAF. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les symptômes associés à l’ETCAF (alcoolisation fœtale) comprennent un faible poids à la naissance, des difformités du visage et de la bouche, des retards de croissance et des problèmes d’audition ou de la vue.</li> <li>Le bébé peut avoir des problèmes cognitifs ou comportementaux moins distincts.</li> <li>Le seul moyen de prévenir l’ETCAF si vous êtes enceinte ou pensez l’être est de ne pas consommer d’alcool. </li></ul>

 

 

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder381.000000000000Fetal alcohol spectrum disorderFetal alcohol spectrum disorderFEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-10T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCAndrew James, MBChB, FRACP, FRCPCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC Margaret Linton, RN12.000000000000035.0000000000000431.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the symptoms and issues related to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Symptoms include problems with facial development.</p><p>Many women drink socially, and about half of all pregnancies are unplanned. Alcohol crosses the placental barrier readily and can easily enter into the unborn baby’s blood circulation. Babies who are exposed to alcohol during the early months of pregnancy may be at risk for a condition known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). About 1% of people living in Canada are affected by FASD. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Symptoms of FASD include low birth weight face and mouth deformities, delayed growth and hearing or vision problems.</li> <li>Children with FASD may have subtle cognitive or behavioural problems.</li> <li>To avoid FASD, if you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant, do not drink alcohol.</li></ul><p>FASD encompasses any of the following diagnoses:</p><ul><li>fetal alcohol syndrome </li><li>partial fetal alcohol syndrome </li><li>alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder </li><li>alcohol-related birth defects </li></ul><h2>Symptoms of FASD</h2><p>Physical problems associated with FASD include the following:</p><ul><li>low birth weight and small head size </li><li>face and mouth deformities </li><li>flat shape of the face </li><li>delayed growth </li><li>bone, joint, or muscle problems </li><li>hearing or vision problems </li><li>genital, heart, or kidney problems </li></ul><p>Examples of facial deformities include underdevelopment of the lower jaw and smaller than normal eye openings. A baby might not have these abnormalities from birth. In fact, problems with facial development usually begin to show between eight months and eight years of age. </p><p>There may be more subtle cognitive or behavioural problems, such as:</p><ul><li>intellectual disability (IQ below 70); however, most children with FASD have IQs in the normal range </li><li>slow learning, short attention span, hyperactivity, or memory problems </li><li>learning disabilities, especially with reading, comprehension, and abstract math </li><li>delays or lack of abilities in speech and language; for example, the child may have receptive language disorder, interrupt, or talk out of context </li><li>lack of executive function skills, including difficulties with organization, planning, and reasoning </li><li>inabilities to manage money, for example, by saving and budgeting </li><li>inability to understand cause and effect </li><li>sensory integration problems: sensitivity to touch or needing more touch than other children, hating bright lights or noise, noticing smells more than others </li><li>irritability, aggressive behaviour, mental illness such as depression, anger control problems </li></ul><p>Because these conditions may range from minor to severe, the old term "fetal alcohol syndrome" has been replaced by "fetal alcohol spectrum disorder." </p><p>These conditions usually do not become apparent until a few years after the child is born, for example, when they start school. If allowed to continue untreated, they can lead to other problems such as mental health issues, trouble with the law, inappropriate sexual behaviour, and alcohol or drug problems. </p><h2>Prevention of FASD</h2><p>The only way to prevent FASD is to avoid drinking alcohol during pregnancy. If you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant, do not drink alcohol. If you have a problem with drinking, talk to your doctor or another health professional. They may be able to help you stop drinking or cut back on your drinking as much as possible. </p><h2>Diagnosis and treatment of FASD</h2><p>It is in the best interest of a baby to determine whether their mother has or had a drinking problem during pregnancy, and to identify if any conditions have arisen as a result. FASD can be diagnosed by evaluating the mother's pregnancy and the birth, doing a physical exam of the baby, measuring facial features, and, as the child gets older, testing their abilities to understand, communicate, move, and adapt.</p><p>FASD is not easily treated. However, an early diagnosis can lead to early intervention such as the following:</p><ul><li>Physical and occupational therapy can help. </li><li>Psycho-educational testing can help determine specific difficulties which can help the child attain services in school that will help with the difficulties. </li><li>Social workers can help the family cope and deal with family issues. </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fetal_alcohol_spectrum_disorder.jpgFetal alcohol spectrum disorder

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