Hospital birthHHospital birthHospital birthEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000040.00000000000001032.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about hospital birth and the three levels of care available: low-risk care, specialty or high-risk care, and subspecialty care.</p><p>Pregnancy and childbirth are normal life events. About 85% of all pregnancies and deliveries have normal outcomes. Because of this, low-risk pregnant women have the option of giving birth at home. Some women, on the other hand, are uncomfortable with this choice, and feel safer in a hospital where high-tech facilities are available if needed. Other women are considered high-risk, and they need to deliver at a hospital where an obstetrician can oversee their labour and delivery.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Different levels of hospital care are available depending on the level of risk of the pregnancy.</li> <li>Specialty care hospitals provide low-risk care as well as care for premature babies and newborns with health problems who are expected to recover quickly.</li> <li>Subspecialty care hospitals provide comprehensive care to mothers and babies at all risk levels, including babies who require complex care.</li></ul>
Accouchement à l’hôpitalAAccouchement à l’hôpitalHospital birthFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000040.00000000000001032.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about hospital birth and the three levels of care available: low-risk care, specialty or high-risk care, and subspecialty care.</p><p>La grossesse et l’accouchement sont des événements naturels de la vie. Environ 85 % des grossesses et des accouchements se déroulent sans complications. Pour cette raison, les femmes dont la grossesse ne comporte pas de risques élevés ont le choix d’accoucher à la maison. Cependant, certaines femmes se sentent plus en sécurité d’accoucher à l’hôpital où des installations à la fine pointe sont disponibles en cas de besoin. Toutefois, dans le cas d’une grossesse qui comporte des risques élevés, il est nécessaire d’accoucher dans un hôpital et d’être assistée par un obstétricien durant le travail et l’accouchement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Différents niveaux de soins hospitaliers sont disponibles en fonction du niveau de risque de la grossesse.</li> <li>Les hôpitaux qui offrent des soins spécialisés offrent des soins pour les grossesses à faible risque tout comme des soins aux bébés prématurés et aux nouveau-nés présentant des problèmes de santé, mais dont on s’attend à ce qu’ils guérissent rapidement.</li> <li>Les hôpitaux qui offrent des soins ultraspécialisés prodiguent des soins de santé complets aux mères comme aux bébés, quelle que soit la nature des risques qu’ils courent, y compris lorsque les soins du bébé sont complexes. </li></ul>

 

 

Hospital birth396.000000000000Hospital birthHospital birthHEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyNANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC12.000000000000040.00000000000001032.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about hospital birth and the three levels of care available: low-risk care, specialty or high-risk care, and subspecialty care.</p><p>Pregnancy and childbirth are normal life events. About 85% of all pregnancies and deliveries have normal outcomes. Because of this, low-risk pregnant women have the option of giving birth at home. Some women, on the other hand, are uncomfortable with this choice, and feel safer in a hospital where high-tech facilities are available if needed. Other women are considered high-risk, and they need to deliver at a hospital where an obstetrician can oversee their labour and delivery.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Different levels of hospital care are available depending on the level of risk of the pregnancy.</li> <li>Specialty care hospitals provide low-risk care as well as care for premature babies and newborns with health problems who are expected to recover quickly.</li> <li>Subspecialty care hospitals provide comprehensive care to mothers and babies at all risk levels, including babies who require complex care.</li></ul><p>There are three different levels of labour and delivery care available at different hospitals. These are referred to as low-risk care, specialty or high-risk care, and subspecialty care. The level of care is based on the individual needs of the mother and baby. After the baby is born, mother and baby may require different levels of care, but every effort will be made to keep them together at the same hospital. </p><h2>Low-risk care</h2><p>These hospitals provide care for low-risk women throughout labour and delivery. Community hospitals often provide low-risk care. Many of these hospitals have birthing rooms where you can labour, deliver your baby, and remain with your baby for the rest of your hospital stay. Birthing rooms are equipped for low-risk deliveries where fetal monitoring, intravenous fluids, and pain medication including epidurals can be administered. They are often quite cozy, with low level lighting and a soft comfortable bed that can be moved into different positions to make labour more comfortable. Some low-risk care hospitals have a different set-up where the woman gives birth in a birthing room and then is moved to another room soon after delivery to stay with her baby. Many times the father can also stay in the room. </p><p>A few hospitals offer the option of having a birthing chair or stool instead of a birthing bed. The birthing chair allows the woman to squat during labour, which is more comfortable than lying down. The birthing chair lets the woman take advantage of gravity to help the baby move through the birth canal during labour. </p><p>Your health-care provider will oversee your labour and delivery in the hospital. This is usually the same health-care provider as the one you visited throughout your pregnancy. </p><p>If you have seen a midwife throughout pregnancy, there is a good probability that they will remain with you throughout your labour and delivery. If your labour becomes high-risk, your midwife will need to transfer your care to a physician, most likely the obstetrician on call at the hospital. </p><p>If you have seen your family doctor or obstetrician throughout pregnancy, it is likely that a hospital nurse or midwife will be with you through most of your labour. The doctor will check on you intermittently and lead you through the actual delivery. Sometimes a different health-care provider may need to watch over you if your regular provider is not available. </p><p>Hospitals that provide care for low-risk pregnant women are able to detect and provide care for unanticipated problems that may affect the mother or baby during childbirth. They are able to provide anaesthesia, radiology, ultrasound, and laboratory services at any time of the day or night as required. They need to be able to conduct a caesarean section within 30 minutes of deciding to do the surgery. The surgery is done by an obstetrician. Hospitals providing care for low-risk women have blood and blood products readily available in case a transfusion is needed. They also need to be able to identify if a mother is high-risk and transfer her to a hospital that provides the required specialty or subspecialty services. </p><p>After childbirth, these hospitals provide postpartum care for both the mother and her new baby. Hospitals that provide care for low-risk women and babies must be able to resuscitate and stabilize newborns if necessary, and evaluate and care for them until they are discharged from hospital. They stabilize and transfer newborn babies and mothers who need specialty or subspecialty care to an appropriate facility. These hospitals also provide nursing care to babies who have been returned to low-risk care from a hospital that provides the required specialty or subspecialty services. </p><h2>Specialty care</h2><p>Hospitals that provide specialty services have the same responsibilities as hospitals providing low-risk care, and they also offer a number of extra services. They take care of high-risk mothers and babies, some of whom are transferred in from low-risk care hospitals. They also provide care for premature babies weighing 1500 g (3 lbs 5 oz) or more, and for other newborn babies with health problems that are expected to improve quickly. Some hospitals have neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) with doctors called neonatologists who specialize in the care of newborn babies. </p><p>Reasons to transfer a woman and her baby from low-risk care to specialty care include premature labour after 32 weeks, fetal growth restriction with low levels of amniotic fluid in the womb, a form of severe high blood pressure called pre-eclampsia, a problem with the placenta called placenta previa, or an inflammation of the fetal membranes called chorioamnionitis. There are numerous other reasons why a newborn baby or their mother might need to be transferred to another hospital during or after delivery. </p><p>Hospitals that provide specialty services are also able to stabilize very ill newborn babies and transfer them to hospitals that provide subspecialty services if necessary. </p><h2>Subspecialty care</h2><p>Hospitals that provide subspecialty services provide comprehensive health care services before, during, and after childbirth for mothers and babies of all risk categories. These include mothers and babies who are transferred from other hospitals. Mothers and babies who should be treated in hospitals that provide subspecialty services include: </p><ul><li>mothers with complex medical or surgical problems </li><li>babies who require complex care upon delivery </li><li>babies with serious birth defects </li><li>premature babies born at less than 32 weeks of pregnancy </li><li>newborns with a birthweight of less than 1500 g (3 lbs 5 oz) </li></ul><p>After childbirth, sometimes the mother needs to continue receiving care at a hospital that provide subspecialty services while the baby is well enough to be treated at a another hospital. Conversely, sometimes the mother gives birth and stays in the hospital where her baby was born while her baby is transported to a hospital that provides subspecialty services. </p><p>This forced separation presents challenges for mother, her newborn baby, and the father. The parents may feel that they cannot bond very well with their baby, but they should keep in mind that bonding takes place over a period of weeks or months, well after the time that their baby is back home. There may be challenges in terms of travelling between hospitals, the cost of obtaining accommodations close to the baby’s hospital, and arranging for child-care for older brothers or sisters. </p><p>Sometimes it is helpful to speak with a social worker or chaplain at the hospital to help ease the distress of being separated.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/hospital_birth.jpgHospital birth

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