Forceps delivery and vacuum extractionFForceps delivery and vacuum extractionForceps delivery and vacuum extractionEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;UterusReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000052.0000000000000607.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the use of forceps and vacuum extraction during delivery, and the preparation for both. Both techniques are also called assisted delivery.</p><p>Forceps and vacuum extraction may be used during delivery if the baby or mother is in distress or if the mother is having trouble pushing the baby out. A number of factors are involved in the use of forceps or vacuum extraction, outlined below.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The use of forceps has decreased over the last several years as caesarean sections are more widely available to deal with risky situations.</li> <li>The use of vacuum extraction has increased over the last several years since it is relatively safe and easy.</li> <li>In order for a delivery by forceps or vacuum extraction, a number of things need to happen including maternal consent, the baby's head should be in the correct position and the woman should have an epidural or another type of effective anaesthesia.</li></ul>
Accouchement avec forceps et ventouse obstétricaleAAccouchement avec forceps et ventouse obstétricaleForceps delivery and vacuum extractionFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;UterusReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000052.0000000000000607.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur l’accouchement avec forceps ou avec ventouse obstétricale et sur la façon de s’y préparer. Ces deux pratiques sont également appelées « accouchement assisté ».</p><p>L’utilisation de forceps et de ventouse obstétricale peut être nécessaire pendant l’accouchement si le bébé ou la mère est en détresse ou si la mère éprouve de la difficulté à expulser le bébé. Un certain nombre de facteurs sont impliqués dans l’utilisation de forceps ou de ventouse d’extraction, énumérés ci-dessous.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’utilisation de forceps a diminué ces dernières années à mesure que les césariennes sont devenues plus largement accessibles pour gérer les situations à risque.</li> <li>Le recours à la ventouse obstétricale a augmenté ces dernières années parce qu’elle est sécuritaire et facile à utiliser.</li> <li>Pour qu’un accouchement avec forceps ou ventouse obstétricale ait lieu, un certain nombre de choses doivent se produire y compris l’obtention du consentement maternel, la tête du bébé doit être dans la bonne position et la femme doit recevoir une péridurale ou tout autre type d’anesthésie efficace. </li></ul>

 

 

Forceps delivery and vacuum extraction403.000000000000Forceps delivery and vacuum extractionForceps delivery and vacuum extractionFEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;UterusReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000052.0000000000000607.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the use of forceps and vacuum extraction during delivery, and the preparation for both. Both techniques are also called assisted delivery.</p><p>Forceps and vacuum extraction may be used during delivery if the baby or mother is in distress or if the mother is having trouble pushing the baby out. A number of factors are involved in the use of forceps or vacuum extraction, outlined below.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The use of forceps has decreased over the last several years as caesarean sections are more widely available to deal with risky situations.</li> <li>The use of vacuum extraction has increased over the last several years since it is relatively safe and easy.</li> <li>In order for a delivery by forceps or vacuum extraction, a number of things need to happen including maternal consent, the baby's head should be in the correct position and the woman should have an epidural or another type of effective anaesthesia.</li></ul><h2>Forceps delivery</h2> <p>Forceps are tong-shaped instruments that can help ease the baby out of the birth canal. These instruments are used to cradle the baby’s head in the vagina and turn the baby into a better position if needed, so that they can be guided out. Forceps are sometimes used if the baby or mother is in distress, or if the mother is having a lot of trouble pushing her baby out. The use of forceps has decreased in recent years. </p> <p>Up until the time that the caesarean section became commonplace, forceps were the only route by which a baby stuck in the birth canal could be safely delivered. The invention of forceps has saved countless lives. Most women have no doubt heard their share of horror stories surrounding the use of forceps, but these are mostly outdated tales from the days before caesarean section. These days, forceps are no longer used in risky situations where the baby is not engaged properly in the pelvis, because caesarean section is widely available to take care of such scenarios. </p> <p>There are, however, a few risks associated with the use of forceps. About one-third of women who undergo a forceps delivery develop tears in the area between their vagina and anus. There is also an increased risk of episiotomy, where the doctor feels it is necessary to make an incision between the vagina and anus, to help the baby come through the birth canal. In rare situations, forceps can cause injuries to the newborn baby’s face or skull. </p> <h2>Vacuum extraction</h2> <p>In a vacuum extraction, a suction cup is placed on the baby’s head, and the doctor uses this to guide the baby through the birth canal. Vacuum extraction can also be used to rotate the baby. Generally, vacuum extraction is used in the same circumstances as forceps: if the "pushing" phase of childbirth is taking too long, or if the baby is experiencing distress. Vacuum extraction should not be used to deliver a baby who is less than 36 weeks gestation. </p> <p>The use of vacuum extraction has increased in recent years because of its relative safety and ease of use. Studies have shown that vacuum extraction is safer for the mother than forceps. Tears in the vaginal and anal area can occur, but they are less frequent than with forceps. In the newborn baby, facial cuts are uncommon and minor. However, because of the pressure of the vacuum on the baby’s head, bleeding can occur under the baby’s scalp in that area. </p> <h2>Preparation for forceps delivery or vacuum extraction</h2> <p>In order to have a delivery by forceps or vacuum extraction, the mother and medical personnel must be very well prepared. A number of things need to happen before such a delivery can be attempted: </p> <ul> <li>The woman must give her consent to the use of forceps or vacuum extraction. </li> <li>The baby’s head should be in the correct position, unless the forceps or vacuum extraction is being used to turn the head into position, and the head should be engaged in the pelvis. </li> <li>There should be no evidence of a condition called fetal disproportion, where the baby’s head is too large to fit through the pelvis. </li> <li>The cervix must be completely open and dilated, and there should be contractions present. </li> <li>The fetal membranes should already be ruptured. </li> <li>The woman’s bladder should be empty. </li> <li>The woman should have an epidural in place, or another type of effective anaesthesia. </li> <li>The medical personnel must be able and prepared to immediately perform a caesarean section if necessary, and resuscitate the newborn baby after they are born. </li></ul>Forceps delivery and vacuum extraction

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