The expecting father: How to help in childbirthTThe expecting father: How to help in childbirthThe expecting father: How to help in childbirthEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC7.0000000000000066.0000000000000539.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about how you, an expecting father, can help your partner when they are going through labour and delivery. Answers from Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Many fathers are fearful of the delivery room. They worry that they might freeze, faint, or become sick to their stomachs if they watch the birth. They wonder if it will be a frightening and unpleasant experience to see their partner go through labour and delivery. One good way to prepare for labour and delivery is to educate yourself about what will happen. Read what your partner reads about childbirth. At your childbirth classes, watch the labour and delivery videos. Visit the hospital with your partner to learn what facilities they have available. Talk to friends about their birth experiences.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Help your partner through labour and delivery by calmly reassuring her, offering praise, distracting her, and encouraging her.</li> <li>If you really do not want to be at the birth find a family member or close friend of your partner who can be there instead, or perhaps hire a doula.</li></ul>
Le futur père : comment aider lors de l’accouchementLLe futur père : comment aider lors de l’accouchementThe expecting father: How to help in childbirthFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC7.0000000000000066.0000000000000539.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur ce que vous pouvez faire, en tant que futur père, pour aider votre conjointe pendant le travail et l'accouchement. Vous y trouverez les réponses des hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>De nombreux pères ont peur de la chambre d’accouchement. Ils s’inquiètent de rester figés, de perdre conscience ou d’être malades pendant l'accouchement. Ils se demandent si ce sera effrayant et déplaisant de voir leur conjointe passer par le travail et l’accouchement. Une bonne façon de se préparer pour le travail et l’accouchement est de se renseigner sur ce qui se passera. Lisez ce que lit votre conjointe au sujet de l’accouchement. Pendant les cours prénataux, regardez les vidéos sur le travail et l’accouchement. Visitez l’hôpital avec votre conjointe pour en apprendre davantage sur les installations disponibles. Parlez avec vos amis de leur expérience.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Soutenez votre partenaire au cours du travail et de l’accouchement en la rassurant calmement, en la félicitant, en tentant de lui changer les idées et en l’encourageant.</li> <li>Si vous ne désirez vraiment pas assister à la naissance, une autre personne, comme la mère de votre conjointe, sa sœur ou une bonne amie pourrait être plus qu’heureuse de l’aider au cours du travail ou sinon, vous pourriez embaucher une doula. </li></ul>

 

 

The expecting father: How to help in childbirth405.000000000000The expecting father: How to help in childbirthThe expecting father: How to help in childbirthTEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)NANANAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC7.0000000000000066.0000000000000539.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about how you, an expecting father, can help your partner when they are going through labour and delivery. Answers from Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>Many fathers are fearful of the delivery room. They worry that they might freeze, faint, or become sick to their stomachs if they watch the birth. They wonder if it will be a frightening and unpleasant experience to see their partner go through labour and delivery. One good way to prepare for labour and delivery is to educate yourself about what will happen. Read what your partner reads about childbirth. At your childbirth classes, watch the labour and delivery videos. Visit the hospital with your partner to learn what facilities they have available. Talk to friends about their birth experiences.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Help your partner through labour and delivery by calmly reassuring her, offering praise, distracting her, and encouraging her.</li> <li>If you really do not want to be at the birth find a family member or close friend of your partner who can be there instead, or perhaps hire a doula.</li></ul><h2>What you can do to help during vaginal birth</h2><p>There are three stages to childbirth. Stage one begins when your partner starts having contractions. The contractions act to open or dilate the cervix to 10 cm (4 inches). During this stage, the contractions will become stronger, more painful and more frequent, as the baby’s head descends further and further down into the pelvis. You can help in a number of ways: </p><ul><li>Reassure your partner with loving words and slow, steady movements. </li><li>Offer praise, not criticism. </li><li>Try to distract her. </li><li>help them to take one contraction at a time. </li><li>Let her stand and lean against you, in an effort to have gravity push the baby along. </li><li>Mop her forehead with a wet cloth and bring her ice chips to chew on. </li><li>Give her a massage if she wants it. </li><li>Encourage her to rest between contractions if she is able to. </li><li>Encourage her to resist pushing until her health care practitioner tells her she should. </li></ul><p>Stage two is when the baby is pushed through the birth canal. The contractions during this time can become very painful and frequent. During this time, continue to reassure, support and comfort your partner. Help her to push when she needs to. If you have a mirror close at hand, encourage your partner to watch the baby coming out if she wants. Listen to the nurses and health-care providers, and give them room to do their jobs. </p><p>Stage three lasts from when the baby is completely delivered until the placenta separates from the uterus and comes out through the vagina. You and your partner will feel relieved that the baby is finally here. You may be given the opportunity to cut the umbilical cord. Once the health-care providers have given their okay, put the baby on your partner’s stomach and encourage your partner to start nursing if she is ready. Praise her and encourage her to relax. </p><h2>If you really don’t want to be at the birth</h2><p>There is a lot of pressure for fathers to attend births. However, if you have attended the childbirth classes, read the books, carefully considered the options with your partner, and you really don’t want to be there, then perhaps there is someone else, such as your partner’s mother, sister, or close friend, who would be more than willing to be her labour partner. If not, consider hiring a doula, which is a professional hired to "mother the mother" and take care of her emotional needs during childbirth. Missing out on the birth will not affect your ability to bond with your baby. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/father_how_to_help_in_childbirth.jpgThe expecting father: How to help in childbirth

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