Vaginal birth after caesarean sectionVVaginal birth after caesarean sectionVaginal birth after caesarean sectionEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;UterusReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000049.0000000000000557.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the conditions under which you may be offered vaginal birth after a Caesarean section, and the considerations/precautions you should take.</p><p>Some women who have a caesarean section may be able to have a vaginal birth in their next pregnancy. In 50% to 85% of cases, a vaginal birth after caesarean section, or VBAC, is successful for both mother and baby. If the reason for the previous caesarean section was cephalopelvic disproportion, where the baby’s head was too big for the woman’s pelvis, the chances of a successful VBAC is 30% to 50%. Certain women who have had a previous caesarean section may be offered a trial of labour and VBAC for their next pregnancy. If you are considering VBAC, it is important to accept the possibility that you may still require a caesarean section after going through the trial of labour. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Some women who have a caesarean section may be able to have a vaginal birth in their next pregnancy, however they may still need a caesarean after going through labour.</li> <li>Women should not have a VBAC if they had anything other than a bikini cut incision in their previous C-section, had a previous uterine rupture, or had a previous surgery to remove fibroids from the uterus.</li> <li>The main concern when a woman attempts VBAC is that her uterus may rupture, a rare but serious complication.</li></ul>
Accouchement vaginal après césarienneAAccouchement vaginal après césarienneVaginal birth after caesarean sectionFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;UterusReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000049.0000000000000557.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur l’accouchement vaginal après césarienne (AVAC) et sur les femmes admissibles à un AVAC. On y discute également des éléments particuliers dont il faut tenir compte, en plus de fournir des conseils.</p><p>Il est possible pour certaines femmes ayant déjà subi une césarienne d’accoucher de leur prochain enfant par voie vaginale. Dans 50 % à 85 % des cas, l’accouchement vaginal après césarienne (AVAC) est couronné de succès, tant pour la mère que pour le bébé. Cependant, si une disproportion céphalo-pelvienne est à l’origine d’une césarienne antérieure, ce qui signifie que la tête du bébé était trop grande pour passer par le pelvis de la mère, les chances de réussite d’un AVAC sont de 30 % à 50 %. On pourrait proposer à certaines femmes ayant déjà subi une césarienne de tenter le travail et l'AVAC lors de leur prochaine grossesse. Cependant, si vous prévoyez avoir un AVAC, il est important de comprendre que l’on pourrait recourir à une césarienne, même après avoir enduré l’épreuve du travail.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il est possible pour certaines femmes ayant déjà subi une césarienne d’accoucher de leur prochain enfant par voie vaginale, cependant l’on pourrait devoir recourir à une césarienne, même après avoir enduré l’épreuve du travail.</li> <li>Les femmes ne devraient pas tenter un accouchement vaginal après une césarienne si elles ont eu toute autre forme d’incision qu’une incision horizontale (« bikini ») lors de leur césarienne précédente, si elles ont des antécédents de rupture utérine ou si elles ont subi une intervention chirurgicale afin de retirer un fibrome de l’utérus.</li> <li>La principale préoccupation lorsqu’une femme tente un accouchement vaginal après une césarienne est la rupture éventuelle de l’utérus, une rare, mais grave complication. </li></ul>

 

 

Vaginal birth after caesarean section408.000000000000Vaginal birth after caesarean sectionVaginal birth after caesarean sectionVEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;UterusReproductive systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000049.0000000000000557.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the conditions under which you may be offered vaginal birth after a Caesarean section, and the considerations/precautions you should take.</p><p>Some women who have a caesarean section may be able to have a vaginal birth in their next pregnancy. In 50% to 85% of cases, a vaginal birth after caesarean section, or VBAC, is successful for both mother and baby. If the reason for the previous caesarean section was cephalopelvic disproportion, where the baby’s head was too big for the woman’s pelvis, the chances of a successful VBAC is 30% to 50%. Certain women who have had a previous caesarean section may be offered a trial of labour and VBAC for their next pregnancy. If you are considering VBAC, it is important to accept the possibility that you may still require a caesarean section after going through the trial of labour. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Some women who have a caesarean section may be able to have a vaginal birth in their next pregnancy, however they may still need a caesarean after going through labour.</li> <li>Women should not have a VBAC if they had anything other than a bikini cut incision in their previous C-section, had a previous uterine rupture, or had a previous surgery to remove fibroids from the uterus.</li> <li>The main concern when a woman attempts VBAC is that her uterus may rupture, a rare but serious complication.</li></ul><h2>Who should and should not have a VBAC?</h2> <p>If you are interested in having a VBAC, the following criteria need to be met:</p> <ul> <li>You should have only one previous caesarean section. </li> <li>The previous caesarean section incision should be of the "bikini cut" style, where the cut in the uterus was made from side to side. The cut in the uterus is not always the same as the cut in the skin so your doctor will need to review the report from your previous caesarean section before advising you to attempt a VBAC. </li> <li>You should not have any abnormalities on your uterus, and there should be no history of uterine rupture. </li> <li>Throughout your labour and delivery, a physician should be available who is capable of monitoring your labour and performing an emergency caesarean section if necessary. </li> <li>There should be anaesthesia and health care personnel immediately available in case you require an emergency caesarean section. </li></ul> <p>There are certain women who should not have a VBAC:</p> <ul> <li>women who had a classic up and down incision, a T-shaped incision, or anything other than the bikini cut incision in the uterus, in their previous caesarean section </li> <li>women with a previous uterine rupture </li> <li>women with a previous surgery to remove fibroids from the uterus </li> <li>women who have a condition where labour is dangerous, such as placenta previa </li> <li>women who do not want to have a VBAC and who would rather have an elective repeat caesarean section </li></ul> <h2>Things to consider with VBAC</h2> <p>The main concern when a woman attempts VBAC is that her uterus may rupture. Although this is rare, it is a very serious complication. The main sign of uterine rupture during childbirth is a problem with the baby’s heart rate. Another sign is if the contractions stop. Other signs include abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, or blood in the urine. Uterine rupture is more likely to occur if the woman had a classic up and down incision or a T-shaped incision in her previous caesarean section. The risk is lowest with a previous bikini cut incision in the uterus. </p> <p>If you have decided to have a VBAC, there are a few important considerations:</p> <ul> <li>Let labour begin and progress naturally, without help from inducing agents. The use of labour induction in VBAC has been associated with higher rates of failure and uterine rupture. </li> <li>Throughout labour, your baby’s heart rate will be continuously assessed using a fetal monitor. The most reliable sign of uterine rupture is a problem with the fetal heart rate. </li> <li>You may use the typical types of pain relief, including epidural, during VBAC. Epidural use will not affect the success of your VBAC or increase the risks of uterine rupture. </li></ul>Vaginal birth after caesarean section

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