Postpartum: Physical concernsPPostpartum: Physical concernsPostpartum: Physical concernsEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;Uterus;Bladder;Pelvis;UrethraReproductive system;Renal system/Urinary systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)Constipation;Fatigue;Fever;Pain;Painful urination2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000044.00000000000001084.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about various physical concerns that can arise after childbirth. Postpartum hemorrhage, fever, pelvic infection, and hemorrhoids are discussed.</p><p>There are a number of serious physical concerns that a mother can experience after childbirth. If you feel that something is not right in your body, seek medical assistance as soon as possible.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>You may experience physical concerns after childbirth including postpartum hemorrhage, fever, infection of the pelvis, uterus or vagina, breast infection, urinary disorders and constipation and hemorrhoids.</li></ul>
Période post-partum : préoccupations sur le plan physiquePPériode post-partum : préoccupations sur le plan physiquePostpartum: Physical concernsFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;Uterus;Bladder;Pelvis;UrethraReproductive system;Renal system/Urinary systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)Constipation;Fatigue;Fever;Pain;Painful urination2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000044.00000000000001084.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les divers problèmes physiques qui peuvent survenir après la naissance. On y discute des hémorragies post-partum, de la fièvre, des infections pelviennes et des hémorroïdes.</p><p>La mère peut présenter divers problèmes physiques graves après la naissance. La présente page décrit certains de ces problèmes et comment les soigner.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Vous pourriez ressentir quelques problèmes physiques après votre accouchement comme une hémorragie post-partum, de la fièvre, une infection du pelvis, de l’utérus ou du vagin, une infection du sein, des troubles urinaires, de la constipation et des hémorroïdes.</li></ul>

 

 

Postpartum: Physical concerns417.000000000000Postpartum: Physical concernsPostpartum: Physical concernsPEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)Body;Uterus;Bladder;Pelvis;UrethraReproductive system;Renal system/Urinary systemNAPrenatal Adult (19+)Constipation;Fatigue;Fever;Pain;Painful urination2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC11.000000000000044.00000000000001084.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about various physical concerns that can arise after childbirth. Postpartum hemorrhage, fever, pelvic infection, and hemorrhoids are discussed.</p><p>There are a number of serious physical concerns that a mother can experience after childbirth. If you feel that something is not right in your body, seek medical assistance as soon as possible.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>You may experience physical concerns after childbirth including postpartum hemorrhage, fever, infection of the pelvis, uterus or vagina, breast infection, urinary disorders and constipation and hemorrhoids.</li></ul><h2>Postpartum hemorrhage</h2><p>Postpartum hemorrhage is excessive bleeding after childbirth. A floppy or boggy uterus that has not contracted down well is the main cause of postpartum hemorrhage. Your caregivers will massage the uterus strongly to make sure it is well contracted. If the bleeding stops with massage, they may give you medication to keep it contracted. If your uterus is well contracted and you continue to bleed too much, they will then look for other causes like tears in the genital tract. When a woman has postpartum hemorrhage, the doctor must determine the exact cause of the problem in order to stop the bleeding. </p><p>Sometimes the uterus can have a serious hemorrhage one or two weeks after childbirth. This could be because of a problem with the uterus shrinking back to its normal size. Hemorrhage can also occur if a part of the placenta still remains in the uterus, but this is very rare. Drugs such as oxytocin or prostaglandin may be used to control the bleeding. Rarely, a surgical procedure called curettage may be used to remove the remaining placental tissue. In very rare cases, the bleeding cannot be controlled by other means and a surgical removal of the uterus, called a hysterectomy, is needed. </p><h2>Fever</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a> is a body temperature of 38.0°C (100.4°F) or higher. The most common cause of <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> after childbirth is pelvic infection. However, <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> may be the result of other conditions such as infections of the <a href="/Article?contentid=783&language=English">respiratory tract</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=935&language=English">urinary system</a>, or <a href="/Article?contentid=441&language=English">breasts</a>. </p><p>If you have a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> lasting more than a few hours, even if you just think it’s a cold, inform your health-care provider. Try to get enough rest, which of course is easier said than done when you have a newborn baby. Drink lots of liquids and use a damp sponge to help bring down the <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>. Your health-care provider may recommend that you take an over-the-counter medication such as <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a>, which is safe for your newborn baby if you are breastfeeding. </p><h2>Pelvic infection<br></h2><p>Most persistent fevers after childbirth are caused by pelvic infection, which is the most common serious complication after childbirth. This type of infection is much more common in women who have given birth by caesarean section compared with those who had a vaginal birth. The symptoms of pelvic infection can range from mild to severe, and may include low abdominal pain, cramping, and an unusual vaginal discharge. Pelvic infections are treated with antibiotics. </p><h2>Infection of the uterus</h2><p>Uterine infections, also called endometritis, are uncommon after vaginal delivery but they are a major problem after caesarean section. Infection of the uterus can cause fever, pain on one or both sides of the abdomen, and a foul-smelling vaginal discharge. Uterine infections can be treated with antibiotics. Once treated, a uterine infection should clear up in 48 to 72 hours. </p><h2>Infection of the vagina and perineum</h2><p>The perineum is the area between the vagina and the anus. Infections of the perineum and vagina, including those of <a href="/Article?contentid=404&language=English">episiotomy</a> incisions and tear repairs, are not common. However, serious infection is more likely to happen if a woman has a very deep <a href="/Article?contentid=404&language=English">episiotomy</a>. Symptoms may include pain, fever, and a discharge from the wound, containing pus. If you notice these symptoms, contact your doctor. If an incision becomes infected, the wound will be opened, drained, cleaned, and repaired. Infections of the perineum can be reduced with sitz baths, which can be purchased from the pharmacy. </p><h2>Breast infection</h2><p>After childbirth, some women develop an <a href="/Article?contentid=441&language=English">infection of the breasts​</a> called mastitis. First there is marked engorgement of the breasts, followed by chills and fever. The breasts become hard, red, and painful. The most common cause of mastitis is an infection from the nursing baby’s nose or throat, which enters the mother’s breast at the site of a crack or small abrasion. Mastitis is treated with antibiotics and it is important to keep breastfeeding to help with drainage. Your newborn baby will not get infected as the infection came from her. If possible, gentle pumping or nursing can be done to help prevent the development of an abscess. If an abscess does form, it is usually very painful and will need to be surgically drained. </p><h2>Urinary disorders</h2><p>The use of oxytocin to induce or enhance labour can sometimes slow down the woman’s production of urine during childbirth. When oxytocin is stopped, the bladder can fill rapidly, to the point of overfilling. This is called bladder overdistention. Regional anaesthesia, such as epidurals, and <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthesia</a> can also lead to bladder overdistention. To prevent this, try and urinate every few hours to prevent over-filling of your bladder </p><p>When a woman has bladder overdistention, she may have difficulty emptying her bladder completely when she goes to the bathroom. As a result, she may have to urinate frequently or urgently, and she may have leaking accidents. Fortunately, there are ways to manage this condition. For example, pelvic floor exercises, also called Kegel exercises, can help to tone and tighten the pelvic muscles, enabling a woman to have better control over the process of urinating. Pelvic floor exercises can be used in conjunction with a technique called bladder retraining, where bathroom visits are scheduled and timed; in this technique, a woman makes a conscious effort to increase the amount of time between bathroom visits. Sometimes, certain medications can also be used to control urinary frequency, urgency, and leaking accidents. </p><h2>Constipation and hemorrhoids</h2><p>Constipation is common after childbirth. This is due in part to the relaxed state of the intestinal and abdominal muscles and continued hormonal influences. Also, if a woman had hemorrhoids during pregnancy, or an <a href="/Article?contentid=404&language=English">episiotomy</a> or tearing during childbirth, her fear of passing a bowel movement may make her constipation worse. </p><p>To avoid constipation, try to move around as soon as possible. Eat a high-fibre diet containing fruits, vegetables, grains, and bran, and drinks lots of water. For severe constipation, ask the doctor or pharmacist to recommend a stool softener or suppository. Avoid pain relievers that contain <a href="/Article?contentid=110&language=English">codeine</a>, because this drug can make constipation worse. Prevention of constipation can help to reduce hemorrhoids. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/postpartum_physical_concerns.jpgPostpartum: Physical concerns

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