Health care at birthHHealth care at birthHealth care at birthEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCHosanna Au, MD, FRCPC11.000000000000049.00000000000001080.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the various types of health care your newborn will receive at birth. Skin care, regulation of body temperature, and eye care are included.</p><p>Newborn babies will require special health care when they're born to help them thrive. If a newborn develops jaundice they will need extra special care.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Health care for your baby at birth includes taking care of their skin, body temperature, eyes, making sure their blood clots properly, the umbilical cord, stool and urine.</li> <li>About two-thirds of newborns develop jaundice, a condition where too much bilirubin builds up in the body.</li> <li>Signs of severe jaundice include yellow tinge to skin and eyes, excessive sleepiness, refusal to feed and weight loss of more than 10% of birth weight.</li> <li>Babies with jaundice will be treated with phototherapy.</li></ul>
Soins de santé à la naissanceSSoins de santé à la naissanceHealth care at birthFrenchNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCHosanna Au, MD, FRCPC11.000000000000049.00000000000001080.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les divers soins de santé que recevra votre nouveau-né à la naissance. On y discute des soins de la peau, du contrôle de la température corporelle ainsi que des soins pour les yeux.</p><p>Les nouveau-nés auront besoin de soins de santé particuliers à la naissance pour les aider à se développer. Si un nouveau-né développe une jaunisse, il aura besoin de soins très particuliers.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>À la naissance de votre bébé, il faudra prendre soin de sa peau, de sa température corporelle, de ses yeux, de son cordon ombilical, de ses selles et de ses urines, et il faudra vous assurer que son sang coagule de manière appropriée.</li> <li>Environ les deux tiers des nouveau-nés développent une jaunisse, un trouble où une trop grande quantité de bilirubine s’accumule dans le corps.</li> <li>Les symptômes d’une jaunisse grave sont une teinte jaune de la peau et des yeux, une envie de dormir excessive, le refus de s’alimenter et une perte de plus de 10 % du poids de naissance.</li> <li>Les bébés atteints de jaunisse seront traités à la photothérapie.</li></ul>

 

 

Health care at birth426.000000000000Health care at birthHealth care at birthHEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCHosanna Au, MD, FRCPC11.000000000000049.00000000000001080.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the various types of health care your newborn will receive at birth. Skin care, regulation of body temperature, and eye care are included.</p><p>Newborn babies will require special health care when they're born to help them thrive. If a newborn develops jaundice they will need extra special care.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Health care for your baby at birth includes taking care of their skin, body temperature, eyes, making sure their blood clots properly, the umbilical cord, stool and urine.</li> <li>About two-thirds of newborns develop jaundice, a condition where too much bilirubin builds up in the body.</li> <li>Signs of severe jaundice include yellow tinge to skin and eyes, excessive sleepiness, refusal to feed and weight loss of more than 10% of birth weight.</li> <li>Babies with jaundice will be treated with phototherapy.</li></ul><h2>Skin care</h2><p>Immediately after birth, your newborn baby’s skin will be patted dry to minimize any heat loss caused by evaporation of amniotic fluid from their skin. Anything else on their skin such as blood, stool, or a cheesy coating called vernix will also be wiped off. Any remaining vernix will usually disappear within 24 to 48 hours through absorption into the skin. </p><h2>Body temperature</h2><p>Before birth, your body regulated your baby’s temperature. After birth, your newborn baby needs to be able to maintain their body temperature. If they have a low body temperature, they may need to draw on their glucose reserves to keep their body warm. This can lead to low blood glucose, which can cause your newborn baby’s temperature to drop even further. Low glucose levels can be dangerous to your newborn baby. To guard against a rapid drop in body temperature, your baby will be cared for in a warm crib, or kept close to you, wrapped in blankets, with monitoring of their body temperature. Keeping your newborn baby in skin-to-skin contact with you is another excellent way to keep your baby’s body temperature stable. their temperature will be checked regularly. Newborn babies should not be bathed until their temperature has stabilized. </p><h2>Eye care</h2><p>Sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea can be passed from mother to baby during a vaginal birth. These diseases are known to cause eye problems in newborns. All newborn babies are given an antibiotic eye ointment called <a href="/Article?contentid=131&language=English">erythromycin​</a> within two hours after birth to prevent eye infections caused by these organisms. The ointment is known to cause blurry vision for a short time, and it may also produce a mild irritation in the baby’s eyes for 24 to 48 hours. </p><h2>Vitamin K</h2><p>Vitamin K is needed to ensure proper clotting of the blood. Babies have a temporary shortage of vitamin K at birth, and therefore your newborn baby will be given an injection of vitamin K within the first few hours of life. The injection will be given in your baby’s thigh muscle. </p><p>In some countries, vitamin K is given orally in a series of doses at feeding times. This requires repeated dosing and is not as reliable as the injection. If you are planning to have your newborn baby son circumcised, the vitamin K dose should be given as an injection. The injection works faster than the oral dosage, and therefore ensures that your baby’s blood will clot properly during the surgery. </p><h2>Hepatitis B immunization</h2><p>Hepatitis B is a virus that infects the liver. Signs and symptoms include jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, and joint pain. Long-term complications of hepatitis B can include lifelong infection, scarring of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Hepatitis B is transmitted through sexual contact, sharing needles, from mother to baby during childbirth, and from mother to baby during the first few months of life. Ninety per cent of babies who are infected at birth will develop chronic hepatitis B infection. </p><p>All newborn babies at risk for hepatitis B should be routinely immunized against hepatitis B shortly after birth. If you have been exposed to hepatitis B recently, especially during pregnancy, your baby should be given both the hepatitis B vaccine and another drug called hepatitis B immunoglobulin shortly after birth. This can help reduce the rate of transmission of the disease to the baby. </p><h2>Umbilical cord care</h2><p>At birth, your newborn baby’s umbilical cord is clamped and cut. The clamp will be removed within 24 to 48 hours. The stump of the umbilical cord on your baby’s navel will look bluish-white and moist at first. However, the umbilical cord stump will quickly lose water and become black and dry. The stump will dry more readily if it is exposed to air, and therefore a dressing is not required. </p><h2>Stool and urine</h2><p>The health-care providers will monitor your newborn baby to make sure that they pass a greenish-black, tarry stool called meconium within the first couple of days after birth. Once feeding is established, this will change to seedy yellow-green stools. Delayed passage of meconium can make jaundice worse and may be a sign of disease in a baby. </p><p>Newborn babies should urinate at least once during the first 24 hours. Once feeding is established, babies should then have four to five heavy urine-soaked diapers in a 24-hour period. </p><h2>Care for newborn babies with jaundice</h2><p>About two-thirds of newborn babies develop jaundice, which gives their skin and eyes a slight yellow tinge. Jaundice is a condition where too much of a chemical called bilirubin builds up in the body. Although the liver and bowel are responsible for getting rid of bilirubin, sometimes a newborn baby’s liver is too immature to properly dispose of all the bilirubin, or the baby doesn’t pass stool frequently enough to get rid of it. Usually jaundice becomes obvious to the human eye two to five days after birth and continues for a few days until the baby’s liver is mature enough to properly dispose of bilirubin. </p><p>More serious cases of jaundice, especially those that start within 24 hours of birth, may be caused by blood group incompatibility or infection in the newborn baby. </p><p>Signs of severe jaundice can include the following:</p><ul><li>yellow tinge to skin and eyes </li><li>excessive sleepiness </li><li>refusal to feed </li><li>weight loss of more than 10% of birth weight </li></ul><p>If your newborn baby shows signs of jaundice, their bilirubin levels will be monitored using a heel-prick blood test. their bilirubin levels need to be kept under control because very high levels of this chemical are dangerous, and can lead to deafness and permanent injury to the brain. </p><p>Your newborn baby will also be treated with phototherapy to help dissolve the yellowish pigment from their skin. In this treatment, your baby will be placed under bright lights, and their eyes will be protected with eye patches. When your baby is under phototherapy lights, no clothes can be worn, except a diaper. Your baby may need extra fluid to keep them well hydrated. This may prove to be a challenge since most babies with jaundice are not interested in feeding. Usually the bilirubin levels can be brought under control within a week of birth. In more serious cases of jaundice, the newborn baby may require an exchange transfusion. An exchange transfusion is when some of the baby’s blood is removed in increments, and replaced with fresh donor blood. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/health_care_at_birth.jpgHealth care at birth

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