Physical examinationPPhysical examinationPhysical examinationEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPCDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCHosanna Au, MD, FRCPC11.000000000000051.00000000000001373.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about what is involved in your newborn baby's first physical examination. Assessment of weight, length, senses, and breathing are included.</p><p>A complete physical examination is done during the first day of life to make sure that your newborn baby is in good health. This type of examination can also reveal certain conditions or problems. A newborn baby’s first examination is likely to be the most complete, but it will not be the last. During your baby’s first physical examination, their health-care provider will check for muscle tone, activity, alertness, skin colour, and will look for any injuries that could have occurred during the birth process. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>During your newborn's physical examination, their health-care provider will check body temperature, weight and length, eyes, ears, mouth, limbs, and the umbilical cord among other things.</li></ul>
Examen physiqueEExamen physiquePhysical examinationFrenchNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPCDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCHosanna Au, MD, FRCPC11.000000000000051.00000000000001373.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur le premier examen physique de votre nouveau-né. On y discute de l'évaluation du poids, de la taille, des sens et de la respiration.</p><p>Durant la première journée de sa vie, on procède à un examen physique complet du nouveau-né afin de s'assurer qu’il est en bonne santé. Ce type d'examen peut également révéler certaines affections ou certains problèmes. Le premier examen du nouveau-né sera probablement le plus complet mais ce ne sera pas le dernier. Au cours de son premier examen physique, l'intervenant de la santé vérifiera le tonus musculaire, le degré d'activité, le degré de vivacité et la couleur de la peau de votre nouveau-né. Il vérifiera également si le bébé a subi des blessures durant le processus d'accouchement.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Au cours de l’examen médical de votre nouveau-né, son fournisseur de soins de santé examinera plusieurs choses, dont sa température corporelle, son poids et sa taille, ses yeux, ses oreilles, sa bouche, ses membres et son cordon ombilical.</li></ul>

 

 

Physical examination428.000000000000Physical examinationPhysical examinationPEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-18T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPCDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCHosanna Au, MD, FRCPC11.000000000000051.00000000000001373.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about what is involved in your newborn baby's first physical examination. Assessment of weight, length, senses, and breathing are included.</p><p>A complete physical examination is done during the first day of life to make sure that your newborn baby is in good health. This type of examination can also reveal certain conditions or problems. A newborn baby’s first examination is likely to be the most complete, but it will not be the last. During your baby’s first physical examination, their health-care provider will check for muscle tone, activity, alertness, skin colour, and will look for any injuries that could have occurred during the birth process. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>During your newborn's physical examination, their health-care provider will check body temperature, weight and length, eyes, ears, mouth, limbs, and the umbilical cord among other things.</li></ul><h2>Body temperature</h2><p>Before birth, your body regulated your baby’s temperature. After birth, your newborn baby needs to be able to maintain their body temperature. Once the amniotic fluid evaporates from your baby’s body, they can quickly lose heat. If they have a low body temperature, they may need to draw on their glucose reserves to keep their body warm. This can lead to low blood glucose, which can cause the baby’s temperature to drop even further. Low glucose levels can be dangerous to your newborn baby. Usually, your nurse will check your baby’s temperature. Most likely, the nurse will use a thermometer under your baby’s armpit, but sometimes a rectal thermometer is used instead. To help keep your newborn baby’s temperature stable, they will be kept in a warm crib where the temperature control is closely regulated. Keeping your newborn baby in skin-to-skin contact with you is another excellent way to keep your baby’s body temperature stable. </p><h2>Evaluation of gestational age, size, and weight</h2><p>The health-care provider will check to see if your newborn baby is approximately the gestational age that was predicted during your pregnancy. If your baby has thin and transparent skin, a cheese-like material called vernix covering most of their body, or lots of soft, downy hair called lanugo all over their body, they could be on the premature side. If, on the other hand, your newborn baby’s skin is peeling or there is no vernix at all, they are probably post-term. </p><p>Size and weight will also be evaluated relative to the newborn baby’s gestational age. Newborn babies who are small for their gestational age are also more likely to have complications that require support.</p><h2>Weight and length</h2><p>Your newborn baby will be weighed within the first few minutes of birth. The scale will have a metal seat that cradles your baby while they are being weighed. A light disposable paper will be placed between the seat and your baby so they don't have to touch the cold metal surface directly. After weighing your baby, their length and head circumference will be measured. All of these measurements will be compared to a chart to make sure that everything is in proportion. </p><h2>Heart and lungs</h2><p>A newborn baby's normal heart rate ranges from 90 to 140 beats per minute. The health-care provider will check that your baby's heart rate is within the normal range, and will listen for any abnormal heart sounds. Unusual heart sounds or beats could indicate a problem with the structure of the heart, and the earlier these are diagnosed, the better. </p><p>The health-care provider will check your newborn baby for any signs of respiratory distress, such as rapid or irregular breathing, grunting while breathing, or a bluish tinge to the lips, gums, and mucus membranes. If your newborn baby's breathing passages contain a lot of mucus, the health-care provider may recommend that you use a nasal aspirator to clear their respiratory secretions for a few days. If there is a more serious problem, your newborn baby may need more specialized care. </p><h2>Eyes and ears</h2><p>Your newborn baby’s ears may be folded over or sticking out in some way. This is normal, and should go away over time. The health-care provider will check to make sure your baby’s ear canals are normal. Your baby’s ears and eyes will be checked for size and any abnormalities. </p><h2>Mouth</h2><p>Your newborn baby’s mouth will be checked. Some babies have a tongue that is attached too tightly to the floor of their mouth. This is called a "tongue-tie" and was once thought to be associated with breastfeeding and speech problems. There is no good evidence that proves this to be the case and many babies with tongue-tie breastfeed easily. The health-care provider will also check your baby’s gums and the roof of their mouth, called the palate. Newborn babies usually do not have teeth present at birth. One relatively common birth defect is a problem with the formation of the palate, called cleft palate. Cleft palate can be corrected with reconstructive surgery. </p><h2>Spine</h2><p>Your newborn baby will be checked for any evidence of spina bifida, which is a neural tube defect where part of the outer covering of the spine is abnormal. </p><h2>Arms and legs</h2><p>The health-care provider will check that each arm has a pulse, that each leg is the same length, and that all the arms and legs show normal signs of movement and strength. Your newborn baby’s arms, legs, hands, feet, fingers, and toes will all be assessed for any abnormalities. Certain abnormalities such as clubfoot, a condition where the front part of the foot is turned inward, can be corrected with surgery. Dislocation of the hips at birth is another common abnormality, and it can be corrected with a combination of splints, harnesses, and sometimes surgery. </p><h2>Abdomen and anus</h2><p>Your newborn baby’s stomach, liver, kidneys, spleen, and other internal organs should all be the correct size and in their proper place. The health-care provider will check for this and also for any abnormalities or swellings. </p><p>The health-care provider will determine if the anus is normal and open. If your newborn baby’s anus is not open or is otherwise malformed, they will need surgery to correct the problem. The doctor will also check to make sure that your baby has passed their first bowel movement, a thick, greenish-black, tar-like substance known as meconium. </p><h2>Genitals</h2><p>In girls, the health-care provider will check that the vagina, clitoris, and other surrounding structures are normal, and that the lips of the labia are separated. </p><p>In boys, the testicles are assessed to make sure that they have descended properly into the scrotal sac. If the testicles have not descended yet, the doctor will need to locate their position, and monitor them while they wait for them to move into the scrotum on their own. If the testes do not descend by the age of two, surgery is required to bring them down to the right place to ensure long-term sperm production and function. The penis is also checked for any abnormalities. </p><h2>Umbilical cord and placenta</h2><p>Your newborn baby’s umbilical cord and the placenta are also checked as part of the regular physical examination. The umbilical cord usually contains two arteries and one vein. </p><p>A blood sample may be taken from your baby’s umbilical cord, especially if they are pale, to determine their hemoglobin level and blood type. It is important to determine whether a baby had any blood group incompatibility with their mother during pregnancy because blood group incompatibility is associated with jaundice in the newborn. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/physical_examination_newborn.jpgPhysical examination

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