Levels of newborn careLLevels of newborn careLevels of newborn careEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-28T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC12.000000000000036.0000000000000715.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the different levels of care that involved in the treatment of a newborn baby. Basic care, specialty care and subspecialty care are discussed.</p><p>There are three different levels of newborn care available at different hospitals. These are referred to as low-risk care, specialty care, and subspecialty care. The level of care is based on the specific needs of the newborn baby.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>There are three levels of newborn care available referred to as low-risk, specialty, and subspecialty care.</li> <li>The level of care a newborn receives depends on how the specific needs of the baby and their health condition.</li></ul>
Niveaux de soins pour les nouveau-nésNNiveaux de soins pour les nouveau-nésLevels of newborn careFrenchNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-28T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC12.000000000000036.0000000000000715.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur les différents niveaux de soins offerts aux nouveau-nés : les soins généraux, les soins spécialisés et les soins ultraspécialisés.</p><p>Trois différents niveaux de soins sont offerts aux nouveau-nés dans divers hôpitaux : des soins à faible risque, des soins spécialisés et des soins ultraspécialisés. Le niveau de soins prodigué dépend des besoins particuliers du nouveau-né.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il existe trois niveaux de soins disponibles pour les nouveau-nés nommés faibles risques, spécialisés et ultraspécialisés.</li> <li>Le niveau de soins que reçoit un nouveau-né dépend de ses besoins spécifiques et de son état de santé.</li></ul>

 

 

Levels of newborn care463.000000000000Levels of newborn careLevels of newborn careLEnglishNeonatologyNewborn (0-28 days)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-10-28T04:00:00ZAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC12.000000000000036.0000000000000715.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the different levels of care that involved in the treatment of a newborn baby. Basic care, specialty care and subspecialty care are discussed.</p><p>There are three different levels of newborn care available at different hospitals. These are referred to as low-risk care, specialty care, and subspecialty care. The level of care is based on the specific needs of the newborn baby.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>There are three levels of newborn care available referred to as low-risk, specialty, and subspecialty care.</li> <li>The level of care a newborn receives depends on how the specific needs of the baby and their health condition.</li></ul><p>After a baby is born, mother and newborn baby may require different levels of care but every effort will be made to keep them together at the same hospital. However, some seriously ill newborn babies must be transported to a hospital that provides a higher level of care.</p><h2>Low-risk care (Level I)</h2><p>These hospitals provide care for low-risk women and their babies throughout and after childbirth. After childbirth, these hospitals provide postpartum care for both the mother and her newborn baby. They must be able to resuscitate and stabilize newborn babies if necessary, and evaluate and care for them until they are discharged from hospital. They stabilize and transfer newborn babies and mothers who need specialty or subspecialty care to an appropriate facility. They also provide nursing care to newborn babies who have been returned to low-risk care from a specialty or subspecialty hospital. </p><h3>Neonatal transport</h3><p>Some premature and newborn babies with serious health problems are born in hospitals providing low-risk care, that cannot give the required level of care. They are transferred to a specialty or subspecialty hospital with the appropriate facilities by a transport team. The transport team generally includes at least two of the following people: </p><ul><li>transport physician </li><li>transport nurse </li><li>transport respiratory therapist </li></ul><p>All these people have expertise in the emergency transport of newborn babies. The transport team stabilizes the newborn baby for transport, and delivers neonatal intensive care to the newborn baby during the transfer from the birth hospital to the specialty or subspecialty hospital. </p><h2>Specialty care (Level II)</h2> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/baby-sleeping-NICU-BRAND-PH_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Hospitals that provide specialty care services have the same responsibilities as low-risk care hospitals, and they also offer a number of extra services. They take care of high-risk mothers and newborn babies, some of whom are transferred in from other hospitals. Specialty care hospitals care for premature babies born at more than 32 weeks gestation and/or weighing 1500 g (3 lbs 5 oz) or more. They also care for other newborn babies with health problems that are expected to improve quickly. Some specialty care hospitals have neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) with paediatricians and doctors called neonatologists who specialize in the care of newborn babies. </p><p>Reasons to transfer a newborn baby from low-risk care to specialty care include premature labour after 32 weeks, fetal growth restriction with low levels of amniotic fluid in the womb, anticipated minor congenital abnormalities, a form of severe high blood pressure in the mother called pre-eclampsia, a problem with the placenta called placenta previa, or an inflammation of the fetal membranes called chorioamnionitis. </p><p>Specialty hospitals are also able to stabilize very ill newborn babies and transfer them to subspecialty hospitals if necessary.</p><h2>Subspecialty care (Level III)</h2><p>Hospitals that provide subspecialty care services care for newborn babies of all risk categories. These include those who are transferred from low-risk care or specialty care hospitals. Newborn babies who should be treated in subspecialty care hospitals include:</p><ul><li>babies who require complex care upon delivery </li><li>babies with serious birth defects </li><li>premature babies born at less than 32 weeks of pregnancy </li><li>babies with a birthweight of less than 1500 g (3 lbs 5 oz) </li></ul><p>After childbirth, sometimes the mother needs to continue receiving care at a hospital that provides subspecialty services while the baby is well enough to be treated at another hospital. Conversely, sometimes the mother gives birth and stays in the hospital where her baby was born while her baby is transported to a hospital that provides subspecialty services. </p><p>This forced separation presents challenges for the mother, her newborn baby, and the father. The parents may feel that they cannot bond very well with their baby, but they should keep in mind that bonding takes place over a period of weeks or months, well after the time that their baby is back home. There may be challenges in terms of travelling between hospitals, the cost of obtaining accommodations close to the baby’s hospital, and arranging for child care for older brothers or sisters. </p><p>Sometimes it is helpful to speak with a social worker or chaplain at the hospital to help ease the distress of being separated.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/levels_of_newborn_care.jpgLevels of newborn care

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.