Your effect on your child's attachmentYYour effect on your child's attachmentYour effect on your child's attachmentEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-09-22T04:00:00ZBrenda S. Miles, PhD, Cpsych10.000000000000046.0000000000000814.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the different types of adult attachment styles, and how a parent's attachment style can affect their child.</p><p>The Adult Attachment Interview is a questionairre that evaluates caregivers' early experiences with their own parents, relating them to how the caregivers would respond to their own baby's signals.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The Adult Attachment Interview evaluates caregivers’ early experiences with their own parents, and relates those experiences to how the caregivers would respond to their baby’s signals.</li> <li>Caregivers are categorized into one of four attachment classifications: secure/autonomous, insecure/dismissing, insecure/ preoccupied, or insecure/unresolved.</li></ul>
Votre influence sur l’attachement de votre enfantVVotre influence sur l’attachement de votre enfantYour effect on your child's attachmentFrenchNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-09-22T04:00:00ZBrenda S. Miles, PhD, Cpsych10.000000000000046.0000000000000814.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en avantage sur les divers types de style d'attachement des adultes et comment le style d'attachement du parent peut avoir une incidence sur son enfant.</p><p>Une Entrevue sur l’attachement des adultes est un questionnaire qui évalue les premières expériences des parents avec leurs propres parents, faisant le lien entre celles-ci et la manière dont ces parents répondent aux signaux de leur bébé.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>L’entrevue sur l’attachement des adultes évalue les premières expériences des parents avec leurs propres parents, faisant le lien entre celles-ci et la manière dont ces parents répondent aux signaux de leur bébé.</li><li>Les parents peuvent appartenir à une de ces quatre catégories d’attachement : sûr et autonome, incertain et évitant, incertain et préoccupé et incertain ou non résolu.</li></ul>

 

 

Your effect on your child's attachment504.000000000000Your effect on your child's attachmentYour effect on your child's attachmentYEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyNANAAdult (19+)NA2009-09-22T04:00:00ZBrenda S. Miles, PhD, Cpsych10.000000000000046.0000000000000814.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Read about the different types of adult attachment styles, and how a parent's attachment style can affect their child.</p><p>The Adult Attachment Interview is a questionairre that evaluates caregivers' early experiences with their own parents, relating them to how the caregivers would respond to their own baby's signals.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The Adult Attachment Interview evaluates caregivers’ early experiences with their own parents, and relates those experiences to how the caregivers would respond to their baby’s signals.</li> <li>Caregivers are categorized into one of four attachment classifications: secure/autonomous, insecure/dismissing, insecure/ preoccupied, or insecure/unresolved.</li></ul><p>A few decades ago, two psychologists named Mary Main and Ruth Goldwyn developed a questionnaire to measure caregivers’ state of mind with regard to attachment. The questionnaire evaluated caregivers’ early experiences with their own parents, and related those experiences to how the caregivers would respond to their baby’s signals. They called this questionnaire the Adult Attachment Interview. </p><p>The entire Adult Attachment Interview takes about one to two hours to complete, and it contains a list of questions such as the following: </p><ul><li>Use five adjectives to describe your relationships with your parents when you were a child. Why did you choose these adjectives? </li><li>What did your parents do for you when you were hurt or upset? </li><li>Did you experience the loss or death of someone close? </li><li>Did you experience abuse or other trauma? </li><li>Did your parents ever threaten separation? </li><li>Why do you think your parents behaved the way they did? </li><li>How have your relationships with your parents changed since you were a child? </li><li>How have these experiences influenced your adult personality and your parenting? </li></ul><p>After finishing the Adult Attachment Interview, caregivers are categorized into one of four attachment classifications: secure/autonomous, insecure/dismissing, insecure/ preoccupied, or insecure/unresolved. Studies have shown that a parent’s attachment classification, usually the mother’s, parallels the child’s in 80% to 85% of cases. </p><h2>Secure/autonomous</h2><p>Secure/autonomous adults are at peace with themselves and their past. They have come to terms with difficult experiences if there were any. They know that these experiences have helped to shape their personality and parenting style. They place great value on relationships. </p><p>Secure/autonomous individuals value their relationship with their child. They generally describe their child in rich and positive words. They know that their relationship with their child is important to their child’s behaviour and development. </p><p>When a secure/autonomous adult takes care of their child, they are sensitive and responsive to the child’s cues. They consistently comfort the child when they are upset, hurt, or ill. They allow the child to explore the world, while at the same time does everything they can to keep them safe. They remain accessible to the child always. </p><p>Children raised by secure/autonomous adults tend to develop secure attachment. They miss their parent when separated, and actively seek out the parent at reunion. If upset, they can be calmed down and will return to playing and exploring. They are positive and socially competent, and they have good self-control. </p><h2>Insecure/dismissing</h2><p>Adults who are insecure/dismissing tend to reject the idea that their past experiences have shaped their personality or otherwise affected them. They may not remember their early caregivers, or they may put them on a pedestal. They do not value relationships. </p><p>Insecure/dismissing adults often have a lack of connection with their child. They tend to be emotionally aloof and distant towards their child. Sometimes they are hostile and rejecting. </p><p>When an insecure/dismissing adult takes care of their child, they tend to avoid emotional and physical contact with them. They show little delight in their child, and do not soothe them when they are upset. They are often neglectful. </p><p>Children raised by an insecure/dismissing parent tend to develop insecure/avoidant attachment. They show little distress upon separation from their parent, and they avoid their parent at reunion. They do not seek help when in pain or upset. Instead, they withdraw and seek distance and isolation. </p><h2>Insecure/preoccupied</h2><p>Adults who are insecure/preoccupied are anxious about their past relationships with their parents. They crave consistent nurturing, and they frequently continue to try to get this. They may be childlike and self-involved. They see relationships as unpredictable, and yet they strive for greater closeness. </p><p>Insecure/preoccupied adults may be distracted when interacting with their child. They have difficulty understanding their child, and they react in inconsistent ways. They are unpredictable, at times angry, passive, or confused. </p><p>Children raised by an insecure/preoccupied parent tend to become very distressed upon separation. They do not settle during the separation. They are less confident, less assertive, and they do not like to explore. They tend to be fearful, tense, and fretful. </p><h2>Insecure/unresolved</h2><p>This is similar to the insecure/ disorganized/disoriented attachment classification in children. Adults who are insecure/unresolved have a great deal of anger and fear, and they think about things in a disorganized and distorted manner. There is usually an unresolved history of loss of a loved one, trauma, or abuse when growing up. </p><p>Insecure/unresolved adults may interact in a chaotic manner with their child. They may be frightened and frightening at different times. They are preoccupied with their own unresolved loss, and therefore are not available to their child. </p><p>Children raised by an insecure/unresolved adult tend to develop an insecure/disorganized/disoriented attachment. They display contradictory behaviours such as freezing, fear, and confusion. They usually have emotional difficulties and unpredictable behaviour. They get frustrated easily, and have poor self control and poor social skills. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_affect_on_your_childs_attachment.jpgYour effect on your child's attachment

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