Skin conditions in babiesSSkin conditions in babiesSkin conditions in babiesEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)Skin;BodyDermatologic systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)Rash;Pain;Runny nose;Cough;Fever;Headache2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC7.0000000000000057.00000000000002088.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about eczema and various skin infections that can arise during infancy. Impetigo, chickenpox, measles, rubella, and roseola infantum are discussed.</p><p>There are multiple skin conditions that can affect your baby. These range from mild conditions such as eczema, to more serious conditions including chickenpox and measles.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Skin conditions that can affect your baby include eczema, impetigo, chickenpox, measles, rubella, roseola infantum, fifth disease, and hand-foot-and-mouth disease.</li></ul>
Problèmes cutanésPProblèmes cutanésSkin conditionsFrenchNABaby (1-12 months)Skin;BodyDermatologic systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)Rash;Pain;Runny nose;Cough;Fever;Headache2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC7.0000000000000057.00000000000002088.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur l'eczéma et les diverses infections cutanées qui peuvent survenir durant la petite enfance. On y discute de l'impétigo, de la varicelle, de la rougeole, de la rubéole et de l’exanthème subit.</p><p>Il existe une multitude de problèmes de peau qui pourraient affecter votre bébé; des problèmes modérés comme l’eczéma, à des problèmes plus graves comme la varicelle et la rougeole.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les problèmes de peau qui peuvent affecter votre bébé comprennent l’eczéma, l’impétigo, la varicelle, la rougeole, la rubéole, la roséole infantile, la cinquième maladie et la maladie pied-main-bouche.</li></ul>

 

 

Skin conditions in babies511.000000000000Skin conditions in babiesSkin conditions in babiesSEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)Skin;BodyDermatologic systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)Rash;Pain;Runny nose;Cough;Fever;Headache2009-10-18T04:00:00ZDouglas Campbell, MD, FRCPCAndrew James, MBChB, MBI, FRACP, FRCPC7.0000000000000057.00000000000002088.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about eczema and various skin infections that can arise during infancy. Impetigo, chickenpox, measles, rubella, and roseola infantum are discussed.</p><p>There are multiple skin conditions that can affect your baby. These range from mild conditions such as eczema, to more serious conditions including chickenpox and measles.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Skin conditions that can affect your baby include eczema, impetigo, chickenpox, measles, rubella, roseola infantum, fifth disease, and hand-foot-and-mouth disease.</li></ul><h2>​​​​Eczema</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=773&language=English">Eczema</a> is basically a bad form of dry skin. It causes extreme itchiness, and if your baby scratches their itchy skin, it will form a rash. Eczema is not contagious, and it tends to occur during dry weather such as winter. </p><h3>Treating eczema</h3><p>There are things you can do to help minimize your baby’s discomfort if they have <a href="/Article?contentid=773&language=English">eczema</a>. Apply a non-allergenic lotion to their skin a couple of times a day, to keep it moisturized. Give them a colloidal oatmeal bath. Dress them in breathable fabrics such as cotton. If their eczema is particularly severe, their doctor may prescribe a steroid cream for your baby, to be used sparingly. Make sure to trim your baby’s fingernails so that they cannot scratch at their skin and make the problem worse. </p><h2>Impetigo</h2><p>If your baby has a wound on their skin that won’t heal or that increases in size, it can become infected. This infection is called <a href="/Article?contentid=796&language=English">impetigo</a>, and it is caused by bacteria called <em>Streptococcus</em> and <em>Staphylococcus</em>. Impetigo starts out as small red bumps, which rapidly change to cloudy blisters and finally sores. The sores are usually one inch or less in diameter and covered by a soft, yellow-brown scab. Sometimes pus drains out of the sores. If the baby picks or scratches at the sores, they can spread and increase in number. </p><h3>Treating impetigo</h3><p>Often impetigo is treated with an oral antibiotic. If your baby is prescribed an oral antibiotic, make sure that they take the doses as prescribed and finish all the medication. </p><p>Sometimes, if there are only one or two sores, an antibiotic ointment may be sufficient. You do not need a prescription for this antibiotic ointment. Make sure to remove the scab before applying the ointment for the first time. If you do not remove the scab, the ointment will have difficulty getting through to the bacteria to kill them. The scabs can be soaked off using warm water and a liquid antibacterial soap. </p><p>Wash the area with antibacterial soap each time before you apply the ointment. Use the ointment for at least seven days. Any new crust that forms should not be removed. </p><p>With proper treatment, the skin will be completely healed in one week. Some blemishes remain for six to 12 months. Scars should not occur unless your baby repeatedly picks their sores. </p><p>Bring your baby to the doctor if the size and number of sores increase after 48 hours of treatment, if your baby develops a fever or sore throat, or if the impetigo is not completely healed within one week. </p><h3>Preventing the spread of impetigo</h3><p>Make sure that your baby does not pick or scratch at their sores. This can cause the infection to spread to other areas of their body. Keep their fingernails clipped short and wash their hands often with antibacterial soap. </p><p>Impetigo is very contagious. Do not share your baby’s towel or washcloth with other people, and keep them out of school until they have been treated for 24 hours with oral antibiotics or 48 hours with antibiotic ointment. </p><h2>Chickenpox</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=760&language=English">Chickenpox</a> is an infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which is a member of a group of viruses called herpes. The main symptom of chickenpox is an itchy rash with small blisters. The rash begins on the scalp and body, and then spreads to the face, arms, and legs over three to four days. The number of blisters can range from just a few to hundreds. Other symptoms may include a slight fever, body aches, sore throat, coughing, lack of appetite, headache, and swollen lymph nodes. A baby may become quite fussy if they have chickenpox. </p><p>The symptoms of chickenpox usually appear about two weeks after being exposed to the virus. The illness is contagious from two days before the onset of symptoms until about five days after symptoms begin, when the blisters have crusted over. The virus can be spread through the air if an infected person coughs, or through direct contact with the blisters on the skin. </p><h3>Treating chickenpox</h3><p>To soothe itching, try bathing your baby in a colloidal oatmeal bath or dabbing calamine lotion on their blisters. Do not give your baby calamine lotion by mouth. <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">Acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> can be given for fever, and it may help minimize their discomfort. Do not give your baby <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">ASA</a>, as it can cause a potentially fatal disease called Reye’s syndrome. </p><p>Call the doctor if your baby’s fever lasts more than four days; if your baby’s rash becomes red and warm; or if they start to show any of the following signs of dehydration: </p><ul><li>dry mouth</li><li>less than six wet diapers per day</li><li>tearless and sunken eyes</li><li>a sunken fontanelle, which is the "soft spot" at the top of your baby’s head</li><li>dry skin</li></ul><h2>Measles</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=752&language=English">Measles</a> is caused by the rubeola virus. Symptoms usually arise about 10 to 12 days after being exposed to the virus, and they include: </p><ul><li>red eyes, cough, runny nose, and fever for the first three days</li><li>a blotchy red rash starting on the face and spreading downward over the entire body for the next seven days</li><li>white specks on the lining of the mouth</li></ul><p>Ear and eye infections may also occur.</p><h3>Treating measles</h3><p>You can use <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to treat your baby’s fever. Follow the directions for use, which are listed on the package. If your baby has a cough, try using cough syrup to make them feel better. A humidifier may also help. If they have red eyes, wipe their eyes frequently with a clean wet cotton ball. </p><p>The rash requires no treatment. Your baby should start to feel better by the fourth day of the rash, and the rash should last a total of seven days. The disease is no longer contagious after the rash is gone. </p><p>There is no immunization against measles for young infants; however, a vaccine for measles can be given at age 12 to 18 months as part of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) immunization. </p><p>Bring your baby to the doctor right away if their breathing becomes laboured, if they are confused or difficult to awaken, if they have a severe headache, or if they otherwise act very sick. Also bring them to the doctor if they develop an earache, sinus pain, or a yellow discharge from their eyes, if their fever is still present after four days, or if their fever returns after having been normal for 24 hours. </p><h2>Rubella</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=758&language=English">Rubella</a>, also known as German measles, is a contagious, viral illness. Symptoms usually arise about 14 days after exposure to the rubella virus. Symptoms of rubella include: </p><ul><li>mild fever</li><li>rash of pink-red spots that starts on the face and moves downward rapidly. The rash covers the body within 24 hours.</li><li>enlarged lymph nodes at the back of the neck</li></ul><p>Rubella is difficult to diagnose because there are many other types of rashes that look the same. A definite diagnosis usually cannot be made unless there is an outbreak of the disease in the community or a special blood test is done. </p><h3>Treating rubella</h3><p>Rubella is a mild disease, and your baby should recover without any specific treatment in three to four days.</p><p>If your baby has a fever over 38.5°C (101°F) or is particularly uncomfortable, try giving them some <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. Follow the instructions provided on the medication package. No other treatment is necessary. </p><p>Bring your baby to see a doctor right away if their rash develops into purple spots or if they start acting very sick. Also bring them to see a doctor if their fever lasts more than three days or their rash becomes itchy. </p><h3>Preventing rubella</h3><p>There is no immunization against rubella for young infants; however, a vaccine for rubella can be given at age 12 to 18 months as part of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) immunization. All children should be vaccinated against rubella according to the schedule recommended by the public health agency in your region. Protection against rubella is very important for all girls and women of child-bearing age. </p><p>Rubella is very dangerous in pregnancy, and can cause many severe birth defects. Therefore, if your baby has rubella, keep them away from pregnant women. If your baby comes into contact with any women of childbearing age, let them know so that they can seek medical attention if necessary. Non-pregnant women who are exposed to rubella should refrain from getting pregnant for three months after exposure to the virus. </p><h2>Roseola infantum</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=757&language=English">Roseola</a> is a rash caused by the human herpes virus 6. It most commonly occurs in children six months to three years of age. The symptoms include: </p><ul><li>high fever for the first two to four days, which disappears very rapidly around the time the rash appears</li><li>a fine pink rash, mostly on the middle of the body, that lasts one or two days</li></ul><p>Roseola remains contagious until the rash is completely gone.</p><h3>Treating roseola infantum</h3><p>There is no particular treatment necessary for roseola. Most babies and children with this condition do not feel very sick. However, if your baby’s fever is particularly high, you may wish to give them <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. Follow the instructions provided on the medication package. No other treatment is necessary. </p><p>Bring your baby to see the doctor right away if the spots become purple or blood-coloured or if your baby acts very sick. Also bring them to the doctor if the fever lasts more than four days or the rash lasts longer than three days. </p><h2>Fifth disease</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=756&language=English">Fifth disease</a> is an infection caused by parvovirus B19. It causes a rash on the face and a lacy red rash on the trunk and limbs. Sometimes the rash is itchy. There may be other symptoms such as low-grade fever and cold symptoms before the rash breaks out. </p><p>A person who is infected with parvovirus B19 is contagious in the first few days before the rash appears. The disease is spread through the respiratory secretions of people who are still contagious with the virus. The rash usually appears about four days to two weeks after being exposed to the virus. By the time the rash is visible, the baby is not contagious anymore, and they can return to day care or school. After someone has been infected with parvovirus B19, they become immune from infection with the virus in the future. </p><p>The parvovirus B19 affects only humans. It is different from other parvoviruses that affect cats and dogs. Therefore, a baby cannot "catch" fifth disease from a pet that has parvovirus. </p><h3>Treating fifth disease</h3><p>Fifth disease is usually a mild illness, and the rash goes away in seven to 10 days. Usually, no treatment is needed for fifth disease. </p><p>However, if the baby or child has sickle cell anemia, other forms of chronic anemia, leukemia, or other forms of cancer, they can become very sick if they develops <a href="/Article?contentid=756&language=English">fifth disease</a>. These babies and children need to be treated by their physician. </p> <h2>Hand-foot-and-mouth disease​</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=755&language=English">Hand-foot-and-mouth disease</a> is a very contagious illness caused by the Coxsackie A16 virus. The illness usually occurs in children from six months to four years of age. </p><p>Symptoms of hand-foot-and-mouth disease usually arise three to six days after exposure to the virus, and they include:</p><ul><li>fever between 37.8°C and 38.9°C (100°F and 102°F), lasting three to four days</li><li>small, painful ulcers in the mouth, lasting about seven days</li><li>small water blisters or red spots located on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet, and the webs between the fingers and toes, lasting about 10 days </li><li>sometimes small blisters or red spots on the buttocks</li></ul><p>Some babies and children who have painful mouth ulcers refuse to drink enough fluid and become dehydrated.</p><h3>Treating hand-foot-and-mouth disease​</h3><ul><li>If your baby will take a cup, try giving them fluids this way rather than using a bottle. Bottle feeding can make the pain from mouth ulcers worse. </li><li>If they are already eating solid food, offer them a soft diet. Cold drinks, milkshakes, popsicles, and sherbet can help soothe their sore mouth. Avoid citrus and salty or spicy foods, as they can irritate the ulcers. </li><li>If your baby’s mouth ulcers are severely painful or if they have a fever above 38.5°C (101°F), give them <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen​</a> according to the directions on the package. </li></ul><p>If your baby has not urinated for more than eight hours, or if they act very sick, bring them to the doctor right away. Also bring them to the doctor if their fever lasts more than three days. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/skin_conditions.jpgSkin conditions in babies

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