Pregnancy-induced hypertensionPPregnancy-induced hypertensionPregnancy-induced hypertensionEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC9.0000000000000059.0000000000000801.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about pregnancy-induced hypertension (high blood pressure). Signs, treatment, prevention, and tests for monitoring hypertension are discussed.</p><p>Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is high blood pressure during pregnancy. When PIH happens it is usually during the last three months of pregnancy. The symptoms usually go away following birth. </p> <p>PIH happens more often in first pregnancies, and the reasons for this are unknown. PIH may be mild or quite severe. Most women do not feel ill with mild PIH; this is one of the reasons why regular prenatal checkups are essential. </p><ul><li>There are three major signs of PIH: high blood pressure, protein in your urine, and retaining fluid.</li> <li>The only cure for PIH is delivering your baby. If your baby is not due yet, your doctor may choose to treat you with bedrest, a healthy diet, and medications to lower your blood pressure.</li> <li>If PIH is not controlled, it can be harmful to the baby and to you.</li> <li>Follow your doctor's advice if you do develop PIH, even if you feel perfectly fine.</li></ul>
Hypertension provoquée par la grossesseHHypertension provoquée par la grossessePregnancy-induced hypertensionFrenchPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSC Rory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC9.0000000000000059.0000000000000801.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en davantage sur l’hypertension provoquée par la grossesse (hypertension artérielle). Cette section contient de l’information sur les signes, le traitement et la prévention de l’hypertension, ainsi que sur les examens permettant de la surveiller.</p><p>L’hypertension provoquée par la grossesse renvoie à l’hypertension artérielle qui se manifeste pendant la grossesse. Le cas échéant, c’est habituellement dans les trois derniers mois de grossesse que l’hypertension artérielle apparaît. En règle générale, les symptômes disparaissent après la naissance du bébé. </p> <p>L’hypertension provoquée par la grossesse est plus fréquente en cas de première grossesse, mais on ne sait pas pourquoi. La plupart des femmes ne se sentent pas malades en cas d’hypertension légère; c’est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles il est essentiel d’effectuer des examens prénataux régulièrement. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il existe trois symptômes majeurs d’hypertension liée à la grossesse : une haute tension artérielle, la présence de protéines dans l’urine et de la rétention d’eau.</li> <li>Le seul remède à l’hypertension liée à la grossesse est l’accouchement de votre bébé. Si votre bébé n’est pas à terme, votre médecin peut choisir de vous traiter en vous recommandant de demeurer alitée, une alimentation saine et des médicaments afin d’abaisser votre tension artérielle.</li> <li>Une hypertension liée à la grossesse non contrôlée peut être nuisible au bébé et à vous.</li> <li>Si vous présentez une hypertension liée à la grossesse, suivez les conseils de votre médecin, même si vous vous sentez parfaitement bien.</li></ul>

 

 

Pregnancy-induced hypertension516.000000000000Pregnancy-induced hypertensionPregnancy-induced hypertensionPEnglishPregnancyAdult (19+)BodyReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPrenatal Adult (19+)NA2009-09-11T04:00:00ZNicolette Caccia, MEd, MD, FRCSCRory Windrim, MB, MSc, FRCSC9.0000000000000059.0000000000000801.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about pregnancy-induced hypertension (high blood pressure). Signs, treatment, prevention, and tests for monitoring hypertension are discussed.</p><p>Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is high blood pressure during pregnancy. When PIH happens it is usually during the last three months of pregnancy. The symptoms usually go away following birth. </p> <p>PIH happens more often in first pregnancies, and the reasons for this are unknown. PIH may be mild or quite severe. Most women do not feel ill with mild PIH; this is one of the reasons why regular prenatal checkups are essential. </p><ul><li>There are three major signs of PIH: high blood pressure, protein in your urine, and retaining fluid.</li> <li>The only cure for PIH is delivering your baby. If your baby is not due yet, your doctor may choose to treat you with bedrest, a healthy diet, and medications to lower your blood pressure.</li> <li>If PIH is not controlled, it can be harmful to the baby and to you.</li> <li>Follow your doctor's advice if you do develop PIH, even if you feel perfectly fine.</li></ul><h2>Signs of PIH</h2> <p>There are three major signs of PIH: high blood pressure, protein in your urine, and retaining fluid. Other signs that may occur are headaches, blurred vision, nausea, abdominal pain, jumpy reflexes, and decreased amounts of urine. </p> <p>If you have PIH, it is very important to let your doctor know immediately if you develop a headache; any change in your vision, such as blurring, double vision, or spots before your eyes; or pain in your upper abdomen. Any of these symptoms may indicate that the PIH is becoming more severe. </p> <h2>Treatment of PIH</h2> <p>The only cure for PIH is delivering your baby. If your baby is not due yet, your doctor may choose to treat you with bedrest, a healthy diet, and medications to lower your blood pressure. If your PIH continues to worsen despite treatment, your baby may need to be delivered before your due date. </p> <p>Many women with PIH feel quite well so it can be hard to accept the need for bedrest. When your blood pressure is increased, it causes less blood to circulate throughout your body, including the uterus and placenta. When you are in a standing position, the heavy uterus puts pressure on the veins in your groin, causing blood to pool in your legs. This decreases the blood supply to the uterus and kidneys. Bedrest, especially lying on your left side, increases blood supply to the uterus and kidneys. Improved blood flow to the uterus benefits the baby, and improved blood flow to the kidneys flushes out toxic waste products and some of the extra body fluid which may build up and cause swelling. </p> <h2>Tests to monitor PIH</h2> <h3>Urine testing </h3> <p>Normally there should be no protein in your urine. However, when the blood supplied to the kidneys is reduced, the kidneys do not function normally. Therefore, your urine needs to be tested and sometimes measured daily. The leaking of protein into your urine is a sign of the kidneys not working properly. The higher the protein, the less well the kidneys are working. The combination of high blood pressure and protein in the urine during pregnancy is called pre-eclampsia. </p> <h3>Reflex testing</h3> <p>Having your reflexes checked indicates the degree of irritability of the central nervous system. PIH can affect the blood supply to the nervous system, causing it to become jumpy or irritable. In the worst cases, this irritability is so severe that you may have convulsions. </p> <h3>Blood pressure testing</h3> <p>An increase in your blood pressure is one indicator of PIH. Your blood pressure needs frequent checking for assessment of your condition and treatment. </p> <h3>Weight assessments</h3> <p>You should be weighed every day at the same time of the day. More than 1 kg (2 lbs) weight gain over a period of a week or less might indicate fluid retention, also known as swelling or edema. You or your doctor may also need to measure how much fluid you take in through drinking or intravenously, and how much urine you are producing. </p> <h3>Blood tests</h3> <p>Your doctor may also order blood tests that can indicate the degree of PIH.</p> <h2>Effect of PIH on the baby</h2> <p>The amount of blood supply to the placenta is reduced with PIH and, as a result, your baby may be smaller than what would have been normal for you. If the PIH is not controlled, it can be harmful to the baby. </p> <p>The best way for you to be aware of your baby’s condition is by doing your kick counts. Your doctor may have you come to the hospital for a nonstress test with an electronic fetal monitor and an ultrasound. These tests give your doctor information on how well your baby is growing and if they are receiving enough nourishment from your placenta. </p> <h2>Helping to prevent PIH</h2> <p>There are many theories about the causes of PIH. You can lessen your risk of developing PIH by not smoking, by avoiding alcohol or any other potentially toxic substances, and by eating a nutritious diet. Avoid too much weight gain or attempts at weight loss. Attend prenatal visits regularly. You do not develop PIH from eating salt or drinking too much water. Both salt and water are necessary for proper function of the kidneys and other body systems and should be taken in normal amounts. If you do develop PIH, the best way to protect your baby and to prevent the problem from becoming worse is to follow your doctor’s advice. You may feel perfectly well and think their concern is excessive. It is not. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/pregnancy-induced_hypertension.jpgPregnancy-induced hypertension

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