Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): Treating health complicationsNNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): Treating health complicationsNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): Treating health complicationsEnglishGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Eyes;SkinSkin;NervesConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-10T05:00:00ZElena Pope, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Patricia Parkin, MD, FRCPC;Stephen Meyn, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FACMG;Andrea Shugar, MS, CGC, CCGC8.0000000000000059.0000000000000553.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how the complications of Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are treated. </p><p>Most children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) (say: noor-oh-fie-broh-muh-TOE-sis) live long and healthy lives. There is no cure for NF1, but proper monitoring can lead to early identification of complications, and intervention where possible. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>There are both common and rare complications that may affect people with NF1. </li> <li>People with NFI and their caregivers should pay attention to any troublesome symptoms and discuss them with their doctor. </li> <li>Most children with NF1 will have only mild symptoms that do not need treatment. </li> <li>If you have any concerns, call your doctor. Do not ignore new or concerning symptoms in your child. </li> </ul><h2>Common complications of NF1</h2><p>Here are some of the complications that can occur with NF1. People with NF1 may only develop one or two of these complications. It is very unlikely that a person with NF1 would develop many or all of the complications listed here.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Neurofibromatosis_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The most common features of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). It is not likely that a child with NF1 will develop many or all of these features.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Neurofibromas</h3><p>Neurofibromas are benign, soft tumours that involve cells that surround the nerves. Benign means they are not cancerous. There are two types of neurofibromas: cutaneous (skin) neurofibromas are small bumps on the surface of the skin; subcutaneous(under the skin) are small lumps under the skin that are often hard. Neurofibromas develop over time throughout the life span. Neurofibromas usually do not need to be removed and can be difficult to remove. Removal may be considered in special circumstances.</p><h3>Plexiform neurofibromas</h3><p>Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumours that involve cells that surround the nerves. They may appear near the surface of the skin or may lie deep in the body. Sometimes they grow to a large size, but usually do not cause any harm to the child's health. Plexiform neurofibromas usually do not need to be removed and can be difficult to remove. Removal may be considered in special circumstances.</p><p>New treatments are being studied. In very rare cases, plexiform neurofibromas may become a cancerous tumour called a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.</p><h3>Optic pathway gliomas</h3><p>The optic nerve is the nerve that connects the back of the eyeball to the brain. When this nerve becomes enlarged, it is called an optic nerve glioma. This occurs in about 15% of children with NF1. However, in most cases (85%), an optic nerve glioma will not cause any problems with the child's sight or health, and is consered asymptomatic (not causing symptoms) and requires monitoring with eye examinations and MRI. Some children with NF1 have symptomatic optice nerve gliomas and these may require treatment with chemotherapy and/or surgery.</p><h3>Bony changes and scoliosis</h3><p>If your child has NF1, the doctor will check their spine (backbone) once a year. If there are abnormalities, the doctor will take an X-ray of your child's back. If scoliosis is confirmed on X-ray, your child may be referred to a bone specialist (orthopaedic surgeon). If the scoliosis is mild, this may require monitoring with X-rays and physical examinations as the scoliosis may progress as the child gets older. Treatment for high-grade scoliosis may include wearing a back brace and/or surgery.</p><h3>Learning difficulties</h3><p>Learning difficulties are more common in children with NF1. If there are concerns about how well your child is doing in school, or if your child shows signs of hyperactivity or attention problems, your child may benefit from a psycho-educational assessment. You may wish to request a psycho-educational assessment from your child's school principal. These assessments are conducted by highly trained educational psychologists using standardized testing to assess children's intelligence, learning, grade level, memory, behavior and other aspects of learning. Results of these assessments may lead to specialized recommendations for your child's classroom placement, such as the development of an Individual Education Plan (IEP). Some children with NF1 have features of Attention Deficit Disorder, with or without Hyperactivity and may benefit from medication. Some children with NF1 have features of social skills difficulties, autism or Asperger's and may benefit from specialized therapy.</p><h3>Other complications</h3><p>Other, less common complications of NF1 include:</p><ul><li>seizures</li><li>increased fluid surrounding the brain (hydrocephalus)</li><li>early (precocious) puberty</li><li>narrowing of the artery that supplies blood to the kidney (renal artery stenosis)</li><li>congenital heart defects</li><li>narrowing of an artery in the brain (Moyamoya disease)</li></ul><p>These are uncommon, but need attention from a specialist.</p><p>If you have any questions about treating NF1 in your child, talk to their doctor.</p><h2>Troublesome symptoms of NF1: When to call the doctor</h2> <p>If your child has any of the following symptoms, contact their doctor:</p> <ul> <li>long-lasting or recurring pain, or pain that wakes your child up or keeps them awake at night </li> <li>numbness, tingling or weakness in an arm or leg </li> <li>changes in neurofibromas, such as persistent and continuous pain, rapid increases in size or hardening </li> <li>problems with vision or bulging of the eyeballs </li> <li>new, lasting or changing headaches </li> </ul>
Neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) - traiter les complications médicalesNNeurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) - traiter les complications médicalesNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): Treating health complicationsFrenchGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Eyes;SkinSkin;NervesConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-10T05:00:00ZElena Pope, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Patricia Parkin, MD, FRCPC;Stephen Meyn, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FACMG;Andrea Shugar, MS, CGC, CCGC8.0000000000000059.0000000000000553.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez comment on traite les complications liées à la neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1).</p><p>La plupart des enfants atteints de neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) jouissent d'une longue vie en bonne santé. Il n'y a pas de remède pour la NF1 mais une bonne surveillance peut permettre de détecter rapidement toute complication et d'intervenir lorsque cela est possible. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Il y a des complications courantes et des complications rares qui peuvent toucher les personnes atteintes de NF1.</li> <li>Les personnes atteintes de NF1 et leurs soignants devraient porter attention à tout symptôme inquiétant et en discuter avec leur médecin.</li> <li>La plupart des enfants atteints de NF1 n'affichent que des symptômes bénins qui ne nécessitent pas de traitement.</li> <li>Si vous avez des préoccupations, veuillez en parler avec votre médecin. N'ignorez pas les nouveaux symptômes ou les symptômes inquiétants qui se manifestent chez votre enfant.</li> </ul><h2>Complications courantes de la NF1</h2><p>Voici certaines des complications qui peuvent se manifester chez les personnes atteintes de NF1. Les personnes atteintes de NF1 pourraient développer seulement 1 ou 2 des complications suivantes. Il est rare qu'une personne atteinte de NF1 développe un grand nombre ou toutes les complications indiquées ci-dessous.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Neurofibromatosis_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Voici les caractéristiques les plus courantes de la neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1). Il est peu probable qu’un enfant atteint de NF1 développe un grand nombre de ces caractéristiques ou toutes ces caractéristiques.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Neurofibromes</h3><p>Les neurofibromes sont des tumeurs bénignes et tendres qui touchent les cellules qui entourent les nerfs. Par « bénignes », on entend qu'elles ne sont pas cancéreuses. Il y a deux types de neurofibromes : les neurofibromes cutanés (peau) sont de petites bosses à la surface de la peau; les neurofibromes sous-cutanés (sous la peau) sont de petites bosses, souvent dures, situées sous la peau. Les neurofibromes se développent au fil du temps et tout au long de la vie. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'enlever les neurofibromes; ils peuvent être difficiles à enlever. On pourrait envisager de les enlever dans certaines circonstances spéciales.</p><h3>Neurofibromes plexiformes</h3><p>Les neurofibromes plexiformes sont des tumeurs bénignes qui touchent les cellules qui entourent les nerfs. Ils peuvent apparaître près de la surface de la peau ou peuvent se loger plus profondément dans le corps. Parfois, ils deviennent très gros mais, habituellement, ils ne nuisent pas à la santé de l'enfant. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'enlever les neurofibromes plexiformes; ils peuvent être difficiles à enlever. On pourrait envisager de les enlever dans certaines circonstances spéciales.</p><p>De nouveaux traitements sont à l'étude. Dans de très rares cas, les neurofibromes plexiformes peuvent se transformer en tumeur cancéreuse nommée « tumeur maligne de gaines nerveuses périphériques ».</p><h3>Gliome du nerf optique</h3><p>Le nerf optique relie l'arrière du globe oculaire au cerveau. Lorsque ce nerf s'élargit er grossit (hypertrophie), c'est ce que l'on nomme un « gliome du nerf optique ». Cela se produit chez environ 15 % des enfants atteints de NF1. Cependant, dans la plupart des cas (85 %), un gliome du nerf optique ne provoque pas de problèmes de vision ni de problèmes de santé chez l'enfant, et est jugé asymptomatique (ne provoquant aucun symptôme). Il faut le surveiller par examens oculaires et IRM. Certains enfants qui souffrent de NF1 affichent des gliomes du nerf optique qui sont symptomatiques; il est possible que l'on doive les traiter à l'aide de chimiothérapie ou d'une chirurgie. </p><h3>Changements osseux et scoliose</h3><p>Si votre enfant est atteint de NF1, son médecin l'examinera pour détecter toute courbure de la colonne vertébrale (scoliose) une fois par année. Si la scoliose est confirmée par des radiographies aux rayons X, votre enfant pourrait être adressé à un chirurgien orthopédiste​, spécialiste des os. Si la scoliose est légère, on pourrait la surveiller par radiographies et examens physiques puisque la scoliose pourrait progresser au cours de la croissance de l'enfant. Pour soigner une scoliose aiguë, on pourrait recourir au port d'un appareil orthopédique pour le dos ou à la chirurgie.</p><h3>Troubles d'apprentissage</h3><p>Les troubles de l'apprentissage sont plus courants chez les enfants qui souffrent de NF1. Si vous avez des préoccupations quant au progrès de votre enfant à l'école, ou si votre enfant affiche des signes d'hyperactivité ou des problèmes d'attention, il pourrait être avantageux d'obtenir une évaluation psycho-éducative. Vous pouvez demander une telle évaluation au directeur de l'école de votre enfant. Ces évaluations sont réalisées par des psychologues scolaires chevronnés à l'aide d'examens normalisés qui visent à évaluer l'intelligence, l'apprentissage, le niveau scolaire, la mémoire, le comportement et d'autres aspects de l'apprentissage de votre enfant. À la suite de ces évaluations, on pourrait émettre des recommandations spécialisées pour votre enfant, comme un Plan d'enseignement individualisé (PEI). Certains enfants qui souffrent de NF1 affichent des caractéristiques du trouble de déficit de l'attention, avec ou sans hyperactivité et des médicaments pourraient leur être bénéfiques. Certains enfants atteints de NF1 affichent des caractéristiques liées aux aptitudes sociales ou des difficultés qui rappellent l'autisme ou le syndrome d'Asperger et pourraient bénéficier d'une thérapie spécialisée.</p><h3>Autres complications liées à la NF1</h3><p>Les autres complications moins courantes qui sont associées à la NF1 comprennent :</p><ul><li>crises;</li><li>davantage de liquide autour du cerveau (hydrocéphalie);</li><li>puberté précoce;</li><li>rétrécissement des artères qui fournissent du sang aux reins (sténose artérielle rénale);</li><li>cardiopathies congénitales;</li><li>rétrécissement d'une artère dans le cerveau (maladie de Moya-Moya). </li></ul><p>Ces complications ne sont pas courantes mais elles doivent être prises en charge par des spécialistes.</p><p>Si vous avez des questions au sujet du traitement de la NF1 chez votre enfant, veuillez en parler avec son médecin.</p><h2>Les symptômes inquiétants de la NF1 : à quel moment faut-il téléphoner au médecin?</h2> <p>Si votre enfant affiche l'un des symptômes suivants, communiquez avec son médecin :</p> <ul> <li>une douleur de longue durée ou récurrente, ou une douleur qui réveille votre enfant ou l'empêche de dormir pendant la nuit; </li> <li>des engourdissements, des picotements ou des faiblesses dans un bras ou une jambe; </li> <li>des changements dans les neurofibromes, comme de la douleur persistante et continue, une augmentation rapide de leur taille, ou un durcissement; </li> <li>des problèmes de vision ou le bombement des globes oculaires; </li> <li>de nouveaux maux de tête, des maux de tête persistants ou des maux de tête qui changent. </li> </ul>

 

 

Neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) - traiter les complications médicales867.000000000000Neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) - traiter les complications médicalesNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): Treating health complicationsNFrenchGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Eyes;SkinSkin;NervesConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-10T05:00:00ZElena Pope, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Patricia Parkin, MD, FRCPC;Stephen Meyn, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FACMG;Andrea Shugar, MS, CGC, CCGC8.0000000000000059.0000000000000553.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez comment on traite les complications liées à la neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1).</p><p>La plupart des enfants atteints de neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) jouissent d'une longue vie en bonne santé. Il n'y a pas de remède pour la NF1 mais une bonne surveillance peut permettre de détecter rapidement toute complication et d'intervenir lorsque cela est possible. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Il y a des complications courantes et des complications rares qui peuvent toucher les personnes atteintes de NF1.</li> <li>Les personnes atteintes de NF1 et leurs soignants devraient porter attention à tout symptôme inquiétant et en discuter avec leur médecin.</li> <li>La plupart des enfants atteints de NF1 n'affichent que des symptômes bénins qui ne nécessitent pas de traitement.</li> <li>Si vous avez des préoccupations, veuillez en parler avec votre médecin. N'ignorez pas les nouveaux symptômes ou les symptômes inquiétants qui se manifestent chez votre enfant.</li> </ul><h2>Complications courantes de la NF1</h2><p>Voici certaines des complications qui peuvent se manifester chez les personnes atteintes de NF1. Les personnes atteintes de NF1 pourraient développer seulement 1 ou 2 des complications suivantes. Il est rare qu'une personne atteinte de NF1 développe un grand nombre ou toutes les complications indiquées ci-dessous.</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Neurofibromatosis_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Voici les caractéristiques les plus courantes de la neurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1). Il est peu probable qu’un enfant atteint de NF1 développe un grand nombre de ces caractéristiques ou toutes ces caractéristiques.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Neurofibromes</h3><p>Les neurofibromes sont des tumeurs bénignes et tendres qui touchent les cellules qui entourent les nerfs. Par « bénignes », on entend qu'elles ne sont pas cancéreuses. Il y a deux types de neurofibromes : les neurofibromes cutanés (peau) sont de petites bosses à la surface de la peau; les neurofibromes sous-cutanés (sous la peau) sont de petites bosses, souvent dures, situées sous la peau. Les neurofibromes se développent au fil du temps et tout au long de la vie. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'enlever les neurofibromes; ils peuvent être difficiles à enlever. On pourrait envisager de les enlever dans certaines circonstances spéciales.</p><h3>Neurofibromes plexiformes</h3><p>Les neurofibromes plexiformes sont des tumeurs bénignes qui touchent les cellules qui entourent les nerfs. Ils peuvent apparaître près de la surface de la peau ou peuvent se loger plus profondément dans le corps. Parfois, ils deviennent très gros mais, habituellement, ils ne nuisent pas à la santé de l'enfant. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'enlever les neurofibromes plexiformes; ils peuvent être difficiles à enlever. On pourrait envisager de les enlever dans certaines circonstances spéciales.</p><p>De nouveaux traitements sont à l'étude. Dans de très rares cas, les neurofibromes plexiformes peuvent se transformer en tumeur cancéreuse nommée « tumeur maligne de gaines nerveuses périphériques ».</p><h3>Gliome du nerf optique</h3><p>Le nerf optique relie l'arrière du globe oculaire au cerveau. Lorsque ce nerf s'élargit er grossit (hypertrophie), c'est ce que l'on nomme un « gliome du nerf optique ». Cela se produit chez environ 15 % des enfants atteints de NF1. Cependant, dans la plupart des cas (85 %), un gliome du nerf optique ne provoque pas de problèmes de vision ni de problèmes de santé chez l'enfant, et est jugé asymptomatique (ne provoquant aucun symptôme). Il faut le surveiller par examens oculaires et IRM. Certains enfants qui souffrent de NF1 affichent des gliomes du nerf optique qui sont symptomatiques; il est possible que l'on doive les traiter à l'aide de chimiothérapie ou d'une chirurgie. </p><h3>Changements osseux et scoliose</h3><p>Si votre enfant est atteint de NF1, son médecin l'examinera pour détecter toute courbure de la colonne vertébrale (scoliose) une fois par année. Si la scoliose est confirmée par des radiographies aux rayons X, votre enfant pourrait être adressé à un chirurgien orthopédiste​, spécialiste des os. Si la scoliose est légère, on pourrait la surveiller par radiographies et examens physiques puisque la scoliose pourrait progresser au cours de la croissance de l'enfant. Pour soigner une scoliose aiguë, on pourrait recourir au port d'un appareil orthopédique pour le dos ou à la chirurgie.</p><h3>Troubles d'apprentissage</h3><p>Les troubles de l'apprentissage sont plus courants chez les enfants qui souffrent de NF1. Si vous avez des préoccupations quant au progrès de votre enfant à l'école, ou si votre enfant affiche des signes d'hyperactivité ou des problèmes d'attention, il pourrait être avantageux d'obtenir une évaluation psycho-éducative. Vous pouvez demander une telle évaluation au directeur de l'école de votre enfant. Ces évaluations sont réalisées par des psychologues scolaires chevronnés à l'aide d'examens normalisés qui visent à évaluer l'intelligence, l'apprentissage, le niveau scolaire, la mémoire, le comportement et d'autres aspects de l'apprentissage de votre enfant. À la suite de ces évaluations, on pourrait émettre des recommandations spécialisées pour votre enfant, comme un Plan d'enseignement individualisé (PEI). Certains enfants qui souffrent de NF1 affichent des caractéristiques du trouble de déficit de l'attention, avec ou sans hyperactivité et des médicaments pourraient leur être bénéfiques. Certains enfants atteints de NF1 affichent des caractéristiques liées aux aptitudes sociales ou des difficultés qui rappellent l'autisme ou le syndrome d'Asperger et pourraient bénéficier d'une thérapie spécialisée.</p><h3>Autres complications liées à la NF1</h3><p>Les autres complications moins courantes qui sont associées à la NF1 comprennent :</p><ul><li>crises;</li><li>davantage de liquide autour du cerveau (hydrocéphalie);</li><li>puberté précoce;</li><li>rétrécissement des artères qui fournissent du sang aux reins (sténose artérielle rénale);</li><li>cardiopathies congénitales;</li><li>rétrécissement d'une artère dans le cerveau (maladie de Moya-Moya). </li></ul><p>Ces complications ne sont pas courantes mais elles doivent être prises en charge par des spécialistes.</p><p>Si vous avez des questions au sujet du traitement de la NF1 chez votre enfant, veuillez en parler avec son médecin.</p><h2>Les symptômes inquiétants de la NF1 : à quel moment faut-il téléphoner au médecin?</h2> <p>Si votre enfant affiche l'un des symptômes suivants, communiquez avec son médecin :</p> <ul> <li>une douleur de longue durée ou récurrente, ou une douleur qui réveille votre enfant ou l'empêche de dormir pendant la nuit; </li> <li>des engourdissements, des picotements ou des faiblesses dans un bras ou une jambe; </li> <li>des changements dans les neurofibromes, comme de la douleur persistante et continue, une augmentation rapide de leur taille, ou un durcissement; </li> <li>des problèmes de vision ou le bombement des globes oculaires; </li> <li>de nouveaux maux de tête, des maux de tête persistants ou des maux de tête qui changent. </li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Neurofibromatosis_MED_ILL_EN.jpgNeurofibromatose de type 1 (NF1) - traiter les complications médicales

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.