HIV and pregnancyHHIV and pregnancyHIV and pregnancyEnglishInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-12-18T05:00:00ZDebra Louch, RN;Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP;Georgina MacDougall, RN8.0000000000000066.0000000000000968.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>If you are infected with HIV and pregnant, learn how certain medicines can lower the risk of passing HIV on to your baby.</p><h2>What is HIV?</h2> <p>HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. <a href="/Article?contentid=910&language=English">HIV</a> is a virus that infects certain cells of the immune system. It makes the immune system weaker over time. This puts a person at risk for other serious infections.</p> <p>A woman who is infected with HIV (HIV-positive) can unknowingly pass the infection onto her baby during pregnancy, at birth or through breastfeeding. Some women do not know they have HIV until they are pregnant and get tested.</p> <h2>Healthy pregnancy and HIV</h2> <p>All pregnant women or women who are considering pregnancy should have a test for HIV. If you are HIV-positive, you should be seeing an HIV specialist. There is no cure for HIV, but there are many medicines that can help keep you healthy. Some medicines are not safe during pregnancy. Your HIV specialist will recommend the safest and best combination of medications for you during your pregnancy.</p> <p>Your HIV specialist will monitor the amount of HIV in your blood (viral load) to make sure the medicines are working. Keeping your viral load under control will help protect your baby from getting infected with HIV.</p> <p>You should also see an obstetrician during your pregnancy. An obstetrician is a doctor who has received special training in the care of women during pregnancy, labour and delivery, and the first few weeks after childbirth.</p> <p>Your family doctor or the clinic where you were diagnosed can refer you to an HIV specialist and an obstetrician.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>All pregnant women should be tested for HIV during pregnancy.</li> <li>Pregnant women who are infected with HIV should take medicines to lower the risk of passing HIV to their baby.</li> <li>If you take medicines and your viral load is low by the time of delivery, the risk of passing HIV to your baby becomes very low.</li> <li>If your viral load is greater than 1000 copies/mL at the time of delivery, having a C-section reduces the risk of passing HIV to your baby.</li> <li>If your viral load is less than 1000 copies/mL, then having a C-section does not give any extra benefit to your baby. You should be able to have a normal (vaginal) delivery.</li> </ul><h2>Taking HIV medicine during pregnancy lowers the risk of passing the virus to your baby</h2><p>If a pregnant woman has HIV and does not receive medicine during pregnancy or delivery, the risk of infection for the baby is around 25%. This means one in four babies will be infected.</p><p>The risk that your baby will be infected with HIV is much lower if:</p><ul><li>You take HIV medicines regularly as prescribed.</li><li>Your health-care team knows about your condition so they can deliver proper care during childbirth.</li><li>After being born, your baby takes medicines for six weeks.</li><li>You give formula to your baby and do not breast feed.</li></ul><p>In this case, the risk of infection to your baby is less than 1%. This means that fewer than one in 100 babies will be infected.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">HIV: Medication and viral load</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HIV_Viral_load_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Taking HIV medication helps reduce the number of HIV in the blood (viral load). When viral load is low, the risk of passing HIV to your baby is reduced.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>When and how long you take HIV medicine depends on your situation</h3><p>Your HIV specialist will discuss the timing of your HIV medicine with you.</p><ul><li>If you need to take medicine for your own health, you will keep taking medicine after your baby is born.</li><li>If you do not need HIV medicine for your own health, you still need to take medication during your pregnancy. When your baby is born, talk to your HIV specialist about your medicine to see if you should continue taking them or not.</li></ul><h2>Normal delivery vs. C-section (caesarean section)</h2><p>If your viral load is greater than 1000 copies/mL near the time of delivery, having a C-section will reduce the risk of passing HIV to your baby. A high viral load can happen for any of these reasons:</p><ul><li>if the medicines are not working, that is if the virus is resistant to the combination of medicines you are taking</li><li>if you started taking medicine late in the pregnancy</li><li>if you are not taking the medicine regularly</li></ul><p>If your viral load is less than 1000 copies/mL, your obstetrician will not likely recommend you have a C-section. It's easier for you to recover for a vaginal delivery. Also, a C-section will not be safer for your baby.</p><p>Talk to your HIV specialist and your obstetrician about what kind of delivery is best for you.</p><h2>What to do when you go into labour</h2><p>Keep taking your medicines, even when you start to go into labour. Go to the hospital soon after you suspect you are in labour. You should be given an additional medicine called zidovudine (AZT) intravenously. It is best to receive it at least two to four hours before the baby is born.</p><h2>For more information</h2> <p>If you are planning on getting pregnant, talk to your health-care provider. They can help you make the safest choices. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.thebody.com/content/art16969.html">http://www.thebody.com/content/art16969.html</a></p> <p>If you have any questions or concerns, contact your doctor or the HIV clinic. For more information, please see the following:</p> <ul> <li>Motherisk <a target="_blank" href="http://www.motherisk.org/">www.motherisk.org</a></li> <li>CATIE: Community AIDS Treatment Information Exchange <a target="_blank" href="http://www.catie.ca/">www.catie.ca</a></li> </ul>
O VIH e a gravidezOO VIH e a gravidezHIV and PregnancyPortugueseNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPC Debra Louch, RN Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>VIH na gravidez: VIH é o vírus da imunodeficiência humana. Saiba quais são os efeitos da imunodeficiência humana na gravidez e os medicamentos para VIH.</p>
فيروس نقص المناعة البشرية والحملففيروس نقص المناعة البشرية والحملHIV and pregnancyArabicInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPC;Debra Louch, RN;Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP8.0000000000000068.00000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ابحث عن معلومات حول مرد الايدز و فيروس نقص المناعة البشرية الذي يمكن ان يؤثر على الجنين خلال الحمل. فيروس نقص المناعة البشرية يجعل ضعف في جهاز المناعة.</p>
HIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕HHIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕HIV and pregnancyChineseSimplifiedInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z如果你感染了 HIV,了解某些药物怎样降低将 HIV 传给孩子的风险。
HIV(人體免疫缺陷病毒)與懷孕HHIV(人體免疫缺陷病毒)與懷孕HIV and PregnancyChineseTraditionalInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z了解嬰兒HIV感染途徑及原因,對HIV孕婦採取適當護理,預防HIV感染
ਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ (HIV) ਅਤੇ ਗਰਭਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ (HIV) ਅਤੇ ਗਰਭHIV and PregnancyPunjabiNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2011-04-12T04:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ਜੇ ਤੁਹਾਨੂੰ ਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ ਹੋ ਗਈ ਹੋਵੇ, ਕੁਝ ਦਵਾਈਆਂ ਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ ਨੂੰ ਤੁਹਾਡੇ ਬੇਬੀ ਨੂੰ ਲੱਗਣ ਦੇ ਖ਼ਤਰੇ ਨੂੰ ਘਟਾ ਸਕਦੀਆਂ ਹਨ।</p>
El VIH y el embarazoEEl VIH y el embarazoHIV and PregnancySpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Conozca los medicamentos para el VIH que pueden disminuir el riesgo de transmitir el VIH durante el embarazo. Lea consejos para el parto de mujeres con VIH.</p>
VVU na mimbaVVVU na mimbaHIV and PregnancySwahiliPregnancyAdult (19+)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Kama wewe umeambukizwa VVU, jifunza jinsi baadhi ya madawa yanaweza kupunguza hatari ya kupitisha V VU kwa mtoto wako.</p>
HIV யும் கர்ப்பமும்HHIV யும் கர்ப்பமும்HIV and PregnancyTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>நீங்கள் கர்ப்பத்தின் போது HIV-யால் தாக்கப்பட்டிருந்தால், உங்களது குழந்தைக்கு HIV தொற்றுவதற்கான அபாயத்தை குறிப்பிட்ட சில மருந்துகள் எவ்வாறு குறைக்கமுடியும் என்பதை தெரிந்து கொள்ளுங்கள்.</p>
حمل اور ایچ آئ ویححمل اور ایچ آئ ویHIV and PregnancyUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>اگر آپ کو دوران حمل HIV سے متاثر ہوجاتی ہیں تو معلوم کریں کہ کس طرح کچھ مخصوص معالجات سے آپ کے بچے کو HIV منتقل ہونے کا خطرہ کم ہوجاتا ہے۔</p><br>

 

 

HIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕908.000000000000HIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕HIV and pregnancyHChineseSimplifiedInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z如果你感染了 HIV,了解某些药物怎样降低将 HIV 传给孩子的风险。<h2>什么是人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)?</h2><p>人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)代表人体免疫缺陷病毒。人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)是一种会感染免疫系统某些细胞的病毒。它会使免疫系统随着时间日渐虚弱。这使得感染者面临其他严重的感染的威胁。</p><p>感染了人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV 呈阳性)的女性会把感染传给她的孩子。人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)可通过妊娠、生产或哺乳传给孩子。一些女性直到怀孕幷做测试时才知道自己感染了人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)。</p><p>如果你是人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)阳性幷且已怀孕或者计划要一个孩子,这一页解释如何降低你的孩子感染人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的危险性。</p><h2>如果你在生产前、生产时和生产后做了很好的护理,你的孩子感染人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的几率会降低。</h2><p>如果你是人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)阳性,你应该去看人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家。如果你已怀孕或计划要一个孩子,这就尤为重要。你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家将会做以下事情:</p><ul><li>为你推荐最安全和最好的药物组合</li><li>检查怀孕期间你血液中的病毒量(病毒载量)以确定药物在起作用</li></ul><p>你还应在怀孕期间看产科医生。产科医生是已接受特殊的怀孕期间、分娩和分娩后前几周孕妇护理培训的医生。</p><p>你的家庭医生或者对你进行诊断的诊所可以为你引荐人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家和产科医生。</p><h2>治疗人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的药物</h2><p>没有治愈人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的方法,但有许多药可以帮助你保持健康。药物帮助你控制病毒载量。将病毒载量保持在较低水平可以帮助保护你的孩子不受人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的感染。</p><h3>如果怀孕前你在服用人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物应采取的方法</h3><p>保持你自己的健康对你的孩子的健康很重要,但是有些药在怀孕期间服用不安全。如果你正在服用人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物幷且你想要怀孕或者发现你已怀孕,让你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家知道。他或她可以为你推荐最好的药物。</p><h2>药物降低你的孩子感染人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的风险</h2><p>在怀孕期间服用人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物可以降低你将病毒传给孩子的风险。研究表明如果女性在怀孕时服用药物幷且在分娩时病毒载量很低,则她将病毒传给孩子的可能性会非常小。你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家和产科医生会在怀孕期间跟踪了解你的病毒载量。这将保证你的药物在起作用幷且你的孩子不会被感染。</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">HIV: </span><span class="asset-image-title">药物和病毒量</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HIV_Viral_load_MED_ILL_ZH.png" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">服用</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> HIV 药物可帮助减少血液中的 HIV 数。血液中的病毒数称为病毒量。病毒量少时,孩子遗传 HIV 病毒的可能性会大大降低。</figcaption> </figure> <h3>何时服用人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物以及要服用多久取决于你的情况</h3><p>你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家将与你讨论服用人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物的时间安排。</p><ul><li>如果你需要为了自己的健康服药,你将在孩子出生后继续服药 </li><li>其他一些女性可能在她们的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)感染阶段上不需要服药。如果你不需要为了自己的健康服用 HIV 药物,你应在怀孕三个月后开始服药。直到孩子出生前一直服用。同你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家讨论何时停止服药</li></ul><h3>怀孕期间比较安全的几种人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物</h3><p>某些人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)药物在怀孕期间是最安全的。它们包括如齐多夫定 (AZT)、拉米夫定 (3TC)、和洛匹那韦/利托那韦(克力芝)等药物。过去还会用别的药物幷且现在更多地在用较新的药物。一些药物在怀孕期间是肯定不安全的。你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家会帮你推荐最安全最好的药物。</p><h2>正常分娩 vs. 剖腹产</h2><p>如果在分娩时的病毒载量大于 1000,剖腹产将减小把人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)传染给孩子的风险。以下任何原因都可能引起病毒载量较大:</p><ul><li>如果药物没能完全地抑制病毒</li><li>如果在怀孕后期才开始服药</li><li>如果没有按时服药</li></ul><p>如果你的病毒载量小于 1000,则剖腹产不会使孩子更加安全。剖腹产比起正常(阴道)分娩对你来说更加危险。因为这个原因,如果在分娩时你的病毒载量较低,你应该可以进行正常分娩。</p><p>与你的人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)专家和产科医生讨论什么样的分娩对你最好。</p><h2>分娩时应做的事情</h2><p>持续服药,甚至当你开始进入分娩。在你感到你即将分娩时,迅速到医院去。你在服用的一种药 (AZT) 应以静脉注射的方式使用。IV 是指将药物注入静脉。最好是在孩子出生最少二至四小时前进行。</p><h2>当孩子出生时应做的事情 </h2><p>当你的孩子出生时,在第一个 24 小时内将开始使用 AZT药物。你需要在孩子出生后六周内每天四次对孩子使用这种药物。这可以进一步减小你的孩子感染人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的可能性。</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">服用口服药</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/oral_medication_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>你的孩子还将需要做血检来检查 HIV。</p><p>不要对你的孩子进行母乳喂养。母乳喂养是母亲将人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)传给孩子的一种途径。配方奶粉对你的孩子来说是最安全的食物。</p><p>更多信息,请阅读 "<a href="/Article?contentid=899&language=ChineseSimplified">HIV和你的宝宝</a>."</p><h2>更多信息,请参见</h2><p> <strong>本页面资源一节的大部分内容只有英文</strong></p><p>如果你有任何问题和担心,请联系你的医生或人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)门诊。更多信息,请参见以下:</p><h3>母亲风险</h3><p> <a href="http://www.motherisk.org/" target="_blank">www.motherisk.org</a></p><h3>CATIE: 艾滋病治疗咨询交流社区</h3><p> <a href="http://www.catie.ca/" target="_blank">www.catie.ca</a></p><h2>要点</h2><ul><li>感染了人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)的女性在怀孕期间应服用药物以降低将人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)传染给孩子的风险</li><li>如果你服用药物且在分娩时病毒载量很低,则将人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)传染给孩子的可能性会非常低 </li><li>如果在分娩时的病毒载量大于 1000,剖腹产会减小把人体免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)传染给孩子的风险 </li><li>如果你的病毒载量小于 1000,则剖腹产不会给你的孩子带来额外的好处。 你应该可以进行正常(阴道)分娩</li></ul> <br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/HIV_pregnancy.jpgHIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕

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