HIV and pregnancyHHIV and pregnancyHIV and pregnancyEnglishInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-12-18T05:00:00ZDebra Louch, RN;Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP;Georgina MacDougall, RN8.0000000000000066.0000000000000968.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>If you are infected with HIV and pregnant, learn how certain medicines can lower the risk of passing HIV on to your baby.</p><h2>What is HIV?</h2> <p>HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. <a href="/Article?contentid=910&language=English">HIV</a> is a virus that infects certain cells of the immune system. It makes the immune system weaker over time. This puts a person at risk for other serious infections.</p> <p>A woman who is infected with HIV (HIV-positive) can unknowingly pass the infection onto her baby during pregnancy, at birth or through breastfeeding. Some women do not know they have HIV until they are pregnant and get tested.</p> <h2>Healthy pregnancy and HIV</h2> <p>All pregnant women or women who are considering pregnancy should have a test for HIV. If you are HIV-positive, you should be seeing an HIV specialist. There is no cure for HIV, but there are many medicines that can help keep you healthy. Some medicines are not safe during pregnancy. Your HIV specialist will recommend the safest and best combination of medications for you during your pregnancy.</p> <p>Your HIV specialist will monitor the amount of HIV in your blood (viral load) to make sure the medicines are working. Keeping your viral load under control will help protect your baby from getting infected with HIV.</p> <p>You should also see an obstetrician during your pregnancy. An obstetrician is a doctor who has received special training in the care of women during pregnancy, labour and delivery, and the first few weeks after childbirth.</p> <p>Your family doctor or the clinic where you were diagnosed can refer you to an HIV specialist and an obstetrician.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>All pregnant women should be tested for HIV during pregnancy.</li> <li>Pregnant women who are infected with HIV should take medicines to lower the risk of passing HIV to their baby.</li> <li>If you take medicines and your viral load is low by the time of delivery, the risk of passing HIV to your baby becomes very low.</li> <li>If your viral load is greater than 1000 copies/mL at the time of delivery, having a C-section reduces the risk of passing HIV to your baby.</li> <li>If your viral load is less than 1000 copies/mL, then having a C-section does not give any extra benefit to your baby. You should be able to have a normal (vaginal) delivery.</li> </ul><h2>Taking HIV medicine during pregnancy lowers the risk of passing the virus to your baby</h2><p>If a pregnant woman has HIV and does not receive medicine during pregnancy or delivery, the risk of infection for the baby is around 25%. This means one in four babies will be infected.</p><p>The risk that your baby will be infected with HIV is much lower if:</p><ul><li>You take HIV medicines regularly as prescribed.</li><li>Your health-care team knows about your condition so they can deliver proper care during childbirth.</li><li>After being born, your baby takes medicines for six weeks.</li><li>You give formula to your baby and do not breast feed.</li></ul><p>In this case, the risk of infection to your baby is less than 1%. This means that fewer than one in 100 babies will be infected.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">HIV: Medication and viral load</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/HIV_Viral_load_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Taking HIV medication helps reduce the number of HIV in the blood (viral load). When viral load is low, the risk of passing HIV to your baby is reduced.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>When and how long you take HIV medicine depends on your situation</h3><p>Your HIV specialist will discuss the timing of your HIV medicine with you.</p><ul><li>If you need to take medicine for your own health, you will keep taking medicine after your baby is born.</li><li>If you do not need HIV medicine for your own health, you still need to take medication during your pregnancy. When your baby is born, talk to your HIV specialist about your medicine to see if you should continue taking them or not.</li></ul><h2>Normal delivery vs. C-section (caesarean section)</h2><p>If your viral load is greater than 1000 copies/mL near the time of delivery, having a C-section will reduce the risk of passing HIV to your baby. A high viral load can happen for any of these reasons:</p><ul><li>if the medicines are not working, that is if the virus is resistant to the combination of medicines you are taking</li><li>if you started taking medicine late in the pregnancy</li><li>if you are not taking the medicine regularly</li></ul><p>If your viral load is less than 1000 copies/mL, your obstetrician will not likely recommend you have a C-section. It's easier for you to recover for a vaginal delivery. Also, a C-section will not be safer for your baby.</p><p>Talk to your HIV specialist and your obstetrician about what kind of delivery is best for you.</p><h2>What to do when you go into labour</h2><p>Keep taking your medicines, even when you start to go into labour. Go to the hospital soon after you suspect you are in labour. You should be given an additional medicine called zidovudine (AZT) intravenously. It is best to receive it at least two to four hours before the baby is born.</p><h2>For more information</h2> <p>If you are planning on getting pregnant, talk to your health-care provider. They can help you make the safest choices. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.thebody.com/content/art16969.html">http://www.thebody.com/content/art16969.html</a></p> <p>If you have any questions or concerns, contact your doctor or the HIV clinic. For more information, please see the following:</p> <ul> <li>Motherisk <a target="_blank" href="http://www.motherisk.org/">www.motherisk.org</a></li> <li>CATIE: Community AIDS Treatment Information Exchange <a target="_blank" href="http://www.catie.ca/">www.catie.ca</a></li> </ul>
فيروس نقص المناعة البشرية والحملففيروس نقص المناعة البشرية والحملHIV and pregnancyArabicInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPC;Debra Louch, RN;Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP8.0000000000000068.00000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ابحث عن معلومات حول مرد الايدز و فيروس نقص المناعة البشرية الذي يمكن ان يؤثر على الجنين خلال الحمل. فيروس نقص المناعة البشرية يجعل ضعف في جهاز المناعة.</p>
HIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕HHIV(人体免疫缺陷病毒)与怀孕HIV and pregnancyChineseSimplifiedInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z如果你感染了 HIV,了解某些药物怎样降低将 HIV 传给孩子的风险。
HIV(人體免疫缺陷病毒)與懷孕HHIV(人體免疫缺陷病毒)與懷孕HIV and PregnancyChineseTraditionalInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z了解嬰兒HIV感染途徑及原因,對HIV孕婦採取適當護理,預防HIV感染
O VIH e a gravidezOO VIH e a gravidezHIV and PregnancyPortugueseNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPC Debra Louch, RN Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>VIH na gravidez: VIH é o vírus da imunodeficiência humana. Saiba quais são os efeitos da imunodeficiência humana na gravidez e os medicamentos para VIH.</p>
ਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ (HIV) ਅਤੇ ਗਰਭਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ (HIV) ਅਤੇ ਗਰਭHIV and PregnancyPunjabiNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2011-04-12T04:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>ਜੇ ਤੁਹਾਨੂੰ ਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ ਹੋ ਗਈ ਹੋਵੇ, ਕੁਝ ਦਵਾਈਆਂ ਐੱਚਆਈਵੀ ਨੂੰ ਤੁਹਾਡੇ ਬੇਬੀ ਨੂੰ ਲੱਗਣ ਦੇ ਖ਼ਤਰੇ ਨੂੰ ਘਟਾ ਸਕਦੀਆਂ ਹਨ।</p>
El VIH y el embarazoEEl VIH y el embarazoHIV and PregnancySpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Conozca los medicamentos para el VIH que pueden disminuir el riesgo de transmitir el VIH durante el embarazo. Lea consejos para el parto de mujeres con VIH.</p>
VVU na mimbaVVVU na mimbaHIV and PregnancySwahiliPregnancyAdult (19+)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Kama wewe umeambukizwa VVU, jifunza jinsi baadhi ya madawa yanaweza kupunguza hatari ya kupitisha V VU kwa mtoto wako.</p>
HIV யும் கர்ப்பமும்HHIV யும் கர்ப்பமும்HIV and PregnancyTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>நீங்கள் கர்ப்பத்தின் போது HIV-யால் தாக்கப்பட்டிருந்தால், உங்களது குழந்தைக்கு HIV தொற்றுவதற்கான அபாயத்தை குறிப்பிட்ட சில மருந்துகள் எவ்வாறு குறைக்கமுடியும் என்பதை தெரிந்து கொள்ளுங்கள்.</p>
حمل اور ایچ آئ ویححمل اور ایچ آئ ویHIV and PregnancyUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-12-17T05:00:00ZJason Brophy, MD, DTM, FRCPCDebra Louch, RNAri Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPCStanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP68.00000000000008.000000000000001110.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>اگر آپ کو دوران حمل HIV سے متاثر ہوجاتی ہیں تو معلوم کریں کہ کس طرح کچھ مخصوص معالجات سے آپ کے بچے کو HIV منتقل ہونے کا خطرہ کم ہوجاتا ہے۔</p><br>

 

 

VIH et grossesse908.000000000000VIH et grossesseHIV and pregnancyVFrenchInfectious DiseasesPrenatalBodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-12-18T05:00:00ZDebra Louch, RN;Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Stanley Read, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FAAP;Georgina MacDougall, RN8.0000000000000066.0000000000000968.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<h2>Pour une grossesse en santé chez les femmes séropositives</h2> <p>Toutes les femmes enceintes ou envisageant de le devenir devraient passer un test de dépistage du VIH. Si vous êtes atteinte du virus, vous devriez consulter un médecin spécialisé en VIH. On ne guérit pas du VIH, mais il existe de nombreux médicaments qui vous permettront de rester en santé. Certains médicaments sont dangereux durant la grossesse. Votre spécialiste du VIH vous recommandera la combinaison de médicaments la plus sûre qui vous sera la plus bénéfique pendant votre grossesse.</p> <p>De plus, il fera le suivi de la quantité de copies de VIH (charge virale) dans votre sang pour s’assurer que vos médicaments ​sont efficaces. Le fait de maintenir une charge virale appropriée réduira le risque de transmission du VIH à votre enfant.</p> <p>Vous devriez aussi consulter un obstétricien pendant votre grossesse. Un obstétricien est un médecin spécialisé dans les soins des femmes pendant la grossesse, le travail et l’accouchement de même que durant quelques semaines suivant la naissance.</p> <p>Votre médecin généraliste ou le personnel du centre de dépistage où vous avez été diagnostiquée peuvent vous orienter vers un spécialiste du VIH et un obstétricien.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Toutes les femmes enceintes devraient subir des tests de dépistage du VIH durant la grossesse.</li> <li>Les femmes séropositives qui attendent un bébé devraient prendre des médicaments anti-VIH afin de réduire le risque de lui transmettre le virus.</li> <li>Si vous prenez des médicaments anti-VIH et que votre charge virale est faible au moment de l’accouchement, le risque de transmettre le VIH à votre bébé est très faible.</li> <li>Si votre charge virale est supérieure à 1000 copies/mL à l’accouchement, une césarienne réduira le risque de transmission du VIH à votre bébé.</li> <li>Si votre charge virale est inférieure à 1000 copies/mL, une césarienne ne sera pas plus bénéfique pour votre bébé. Vous devriez être en mesure d’accoucher par voie vaginale.</li> </ul><h2>La prise de médicaments anti-VIH durant la grossesse diminue le risque de transmission du virus à votre bébé</h2> <p>Le risque pour les femmes enceintes séropositives qui ne prennent aucun médicament anti-VIH pendant la grossesse ou l’accouchement de transmettre le virus à leur bébé est d’environ 25 %. Cela veut dire qu’un bébé sur quatre sera infecté.</p> <p>Le risque de transmission sera nettement plus faible:</p> <ul> <li>si vous prenez régulièrement vos médicaments anti-VIH de la manière prescrite, </li><li>si votre équipe médicale est au courant de votre état, ce qui lui permettra de vous prodiguer les soins appropriés pendant l’accouchement, </li><li>si, après la naissance, vous donnez des médicaments à votre bébé durant 6 semaines, </li><li>si vous nourrissez votre bébé au lait maternisé au lieu de l’allaiter.</li> </ul> <p>Toutes ces précautions permettent de réduire le risque d’infection des bébés à moins de 1 %, ce qui veut dire que seulement un bébé sur 100 sera infecté.​​</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">VIH : Médicaments et charge virale</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/HIV_Viral_load_MED_ILL_fr.png" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">La prise de médicaments pour le VIH aide à réduire le nombre de VIH dans le sang. Le nombre de virus dans le sang se nomme « charge virale ». Lorsque la charge virale est faible, le risque de transmettre le VIH à votre bébé est beaucoup moins élevé.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>Quand et pendant combien de temps vous devez prendre des médicaments anti-VIH dépend de votre état</h3> <p>Votre spécialiste du VIH discutera avec vous du moment où vous devez prendre des médicaments et de la durée de ce traitement.</p> <ul> <li>Si vous devez prendre des médicaments pour votre propre santé, vous continuerez de les prendre après la naissance de votre bébé.</li> <li>Si votre état n’exige pas de médicaments, vous devrez néanmoins en prendre pendant la grossesse. Après la naissance de votre bébé, demandez à votre spécialiste du VIH si vous devriez ou non continuer de les prendre.</li> </ul> <h2>Accouchement par voie vaginale vs césarienne</h2> <p>Si votre charge virale est supérieure à 1000 copies/mL lorsque vous êtes près du moment d’accoucher, une césarienne réduira le risque de transmission du VIH à votre bébé. Une charge virale élevée peut être causée par l’un ou l’autre des facteurs suivants:</p> <ul> <li>si les médicaments sont inefficaces, c’est-à-dire que le virus résiste à la combinaison de médicaments que vous prenez,</li> <li>si vous avez commencé à prendre des médicaments à un moment avancé de votre grossesse,</li> <li>si vous ne prenez pas régulièrement vos médicaments.</li> </ul> <p>Si votre charge virale est inférieure à 1000 copies/mL, il est peu probable que votre obstétricien vous recommande une césarienne. Non seulement il est plus facile de se rétablir d’un accouchement par voie vaginale, mais une césarienne ne protégera pas davantage votre bébé.</p> <p>Demandez à votre spécialiste du VIH et à votre obstétricien quel type d’accouchement vous convient le mieux.</p> <h2>Que faire quand le travail commence</h2> <p>Ne cessez pas de prendre vos médicaments, même quand le travail commencera. Rendez-vous à l’hôpital dès que vous supsectez que le travail a commencé. On devrait vous y administrer un médicament supplémentaire appelé zidovudine (AZT) par voie intraveineuse. Il est préférable de prendre ce médicament deux à quatre heures avant l’accouchement.</p><h2>Ce à quoi vous attendre après la naissance de votre bébé</h2> <p>Nourrissez votre enfant au lait maternisé au lieu de l’allaiter</p> <p>Au Canada et dans les autre pays développés, l’emploi de lait maternisé est la façon la plus sûre pour les mères séropositives de nourrir leurs bébés. Vous pouvez transmettre le VIH à votre bébé en l’allaitant même si votre charge virale est indécelable. Discutez avec votre équipe de soins de santé de vos sentiments au sujet de l’allaitement et de vos préoccupations éventuels du fait de ne pas allaiter votre bébé.</p> <p>En Ontario, The Teresa Group fournit gratuitement du lait maternisé pendant la première année de vie aux bébés de mères séropositives. Pour en savoir davantage, communiquez avec The Teresa Group en composant le 416 596-7703 ou en consultant leur site Web.</p> <p> Si vous vivez à l’extérieur de l’Ontario, renseignez-vous auprès de votre fournisseur de soins de santé au sujet des programmes offrant gratuitement du lait maternisé.</p> <h2>Votre bébé subira des tests de dépistage du VIH</h2> <p>Le médecin ne peut pas vous dire si votre bébé est séropositif simplement en l’observant. En général, rien ne peut permettre de faire la distinction entre les enfants séropositifs et séronégatifs. Les autres infections que présentent les bébés peuvent être causées par le VIH. Il peut toutefois s’agir d’infections que les bébés auraient contractées de toute manière.</p> <h3>Tests de dépistage du VIH</h3> <p>Le médecin de votre bébé doit faire trois analyses de sang. La première est faite peu après la naissance et, d’habitude, la deuxième et la troisième se font respectivement à l’âge d’un mois et de deux mois. L’analyse sert à dépister le VIH dans le sang de votre bébé. Vous devez compter environ un mois avant que le médecin n’obtienne les résultats. Si ceux-ci sont négatifs (ne révèlent aucun virus), votre bébé est séronégatif, c’est-à-dire, qu’il n’a pas contracté le VIH.</p> <h2>Votre bébé devra prendre de l’AZT</h2> <p>On commencera à administrer de l’AZT à votre bébé dans les 24 heures suivant sa naissance. Vous devrez continuer de lui donner ce médicament deux fois par jour pendant ses six premières semaines de vie. </p> <p>L’AZT peut réduire davantage le risque d’infection à VIH chez votre bébé. Celui-ci devra aussi subir des tests de dépistage sanguin pour le virus. Un infirmier ou un autre professionnel de soins de santé vous montrera comment administrer le médicament. Au Canada, ce dernier est fourni gratuitement par le ministère de la Santé de chaque province.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Administration de médicaments par voie orale</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/oral_medication_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <h3>Votre bébé peut présenter des effets secondaires des médicaments</h3> <p>Même si les résultats des tests de dépistage du VIH de votre bébé sont négatifs, le médecin fera un suivi afin de déterminer si les médicaments entraînent des problèmes à court terme ou à long terme. Les médicaments prescrits aux mères enceintes ne présentent aucun danger. Ils peuvent parfois causer quelques effets indésirables à court terme.</p> <ul><li>L’AZT peut causer une anémie​ chez votre bébé après la naissance. L’anémie est le fait de ne pas avoir assez de globules rouges, lesquels transportent l’oxygène dans le reste de l’organisme.</li> <li>L’AZT peut aussi nuire aux mitochondries, ce qui peut causer des troubles sanguins ou hépatiques (foie).Les mitochondries, qui sont présentes dans toutes les cellules de l’organisme, contribuent à la production d’énergie dans ces dernières.</li></ul> <p>L’anémie ou le dommage mitochondrial disparaît généralement lorsque vous cessez de donner l’AZT à votre bébé.</p> <p>À ce jour, aucun problème lié à l’administration de ce médicament n’a été signalé. L’AZT ne cause aucun effet secondaire important à long terme. Les enfants à qui on a donné de l’AZT sont normaux.</p> <p>Votre équipe de soins de santé évaluera le développement de votre enfant de façon régulière. Si son développement suscite des préoccupations, l’équipe vous fera des recommandations ou vous orientera vers d’autres programmes.</p> <h2>Si les résultats du test de dépistage pour le VIH de votre bébé est positif</h2> <p>Au Canada, les enfants séropositifs peuvent conserver la santé et vivre normalement s’ils obtiennent régulièrement des soins de leur centre VIH et prennent leurs médicaments de la manière prescrite. Si le VIH est diagnostiqué précocement chez votre bébé, le médecin pourra, au besoin, lui prescrire sans tarder les médicaments qui lui permettront de rester en santé.</p><h2>Pour plus de renseignements</h2> <p>Si vous planifiez une grossesse, parlez-en à votre fournisseur de soins de santé. Il peut vous aider à faire les choix les plus sûrs. Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez consulter l’article à <a href="http://www.thebody.com/content/art16969.html">http://www.thebody.com/content/art16969.html</a>(en anglais seulement).</p> <p>Si vous avez des questions ou des préoccupations, communiquez avec votre médecin ou le centre VIH. Pour obtenir des renseignements supplémentaires, veuillez consulter les sites Web suivants :</p> <ul> <li>Motherisk à <a target="_blank" href="http://www.motherisk.org/">www.motherisk.org</a></li> <li>CATIE: la source canadienne de renseignements sur le VIH, à <a target="_blank" href="http://www.catie.ca/">www.catie.ca</a></li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/HIV_pregnancy.jpgVIH et grossesse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.