Intussusception: Before and after surgeryIIntussusception: Before and after surgeryIntussusception: Before and after surgeryEnglishGastrointestinalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)Small Intestine;Large Intestine/ColonSmall intestine;Large intestineProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-11-17T05:00:00Z5B Practice Council -- The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids)8.0000000000000061.00000000000001256.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn more about intussusception and how you can properly care for your child before and after surgery.</p><h2>What is intussusception?</h2><p>Intussusception (IN-tuh-suss-SEP-shun) occurs when a part of the intestine folds into itself like a telescope, with one segment slipping inside another segment. This causes a blockage, preventing the passage of food through the intestine. When the "telescoped" section of the intestines is pressing on each other for a long period of time, it can cause irritation and swelling. This can cut off the blood supply to the intestines and cause serious damage. Symptoms of intussusception may include: severe pain, vomiting or passing bloody and/or jelly-like stools. If your child's doctor thinks your child has intussusception, the doctor will do a physical exam and history and order an ultrasound.</p> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <span class="asset-image-title"> Intussusception</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Intussusception_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> Intussusception occurs when part of the intestine folds in on itself. This commonly occurs where the large intestine meets up with the small intestine.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Intussusception occurs when a part of the intestine folds into itself like a telescope. This prevents the passage of food through the intestine.</li> <li>Your child will not be able to eat or drink while under assessment for intussusception.</li> <li>Your child will be given a general anaesthetic before surgery. This will ensure your child stays asleep throughout the surgery.</li> <li>For pain relief, give your child acetaminophen or ibuprofen for the first 24 hours. Follow the instructions on the bottle.</li> <li>If you have any urgent concerns following surgery, take your child to the nearest Emergency Department.</li> </ul><h2>When to call the surgery team</h2> <p>After you have gone home you will need to watch for signs of infection and signs that intussusception has recurred (the intussusception has come back). The risk of recurrence (the intussusception coming back) is about 10% and is greatest within the first 48 hours following the intussusception being fixed. The risk of recurrence is much lower if a piece of intestine has been removed at the time of surgery.</p> <h3>Please call your surgeon's office if you see any signs of infection. These include:</h3> <ul> <li><a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> of 38°C (100.4°F) or higher</li> <li>redness around the incision</li> <li>drainage from the incision is yellow or green and has a foul smell</li> <li>swelling at the incision site</li> <li>increasing pain around the incision site.<br></li> </ul> <h3>Please call your surgeon's office if you see any signs of recurrence. These include:</h3> <ul> <li><a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> </li> <li>blood in the stool or stools that look like currant jelly</li> <li>abdominal pain </li> <li>fever of 38°C (100.4°F) or higher</li> <li>abdominal distension (a swollen tummy)</li> <li>irritability or difficulty settling. <br></li> </ul> <p>If you have a question or a concern that is not urgent, call your child's surgeon's office during business hours or leave a message on the answering machine after hours. If you have an urgent concern, take your child to their family doctor, paediatrician or the nearest Emergency Department. </p> <h2>Important contact information</h2> <h3>My child's surgeon is:</h3> <h3>Phone number:</h3> <h3>My child's regular doctor is:</h3> <h3>Phone number:</h3><h2>Treatment of intussusception</h2> <p>If your child has intussusception, the doctors will then decide on a treatment plan. This may include an air enema and/or surgery.</p> <h3>Air enema</h3> <p>An air enema is performed in the X-ray department by a radiologist. During the air enema, a small, soft tube is placed in the rectum and air is passed through it. The air travels into the intestines and attempts to unfold the bowel that has "telescoped," fixing the intussusception. The doctors may have to repeat the air enema to be successful. Your child will remain in the emergency room for observation. If the doctors decide an air enema is not appropriate, or the air enema(s) are not successful, the decision to take your child to surgery may be made.</p><h2>During the surgery</h2> <p>Your child will be given a general anaesthetic. This ensures that your child remains asleep through the surgery and prevents them from feeling any pain. Your child will also receive a dose of antibiotics through their IV before the surgery.</p> <p>During the surgery, the surgeon will free the portion of the intestine that is telescoped and, if necessary, remove any of the intestinal tissue that has been damaged. Depending on the situation, the operation may be done <a href="/Article?contentid=1005&language=English">laparoscopically</a> (using several small incisions) or open (using a larger incision).</p> <p>The incision(s) will be closed using small pieces of tape called Steri-Strips.</p><h2>After the surgery</h2><p>After the surgery, your child will go to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit (PACU) or recovery room to wake up. You may visit your child once they wake up. Upon waking up, they will go to an inpatient unit.</p><p>Your child may have a tube in their nose called a <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=2457&language=English">nasogastric (NG) tube</a>, which will help keep their stomach empty while the bowels heal. Your child will receive pain medication through their IV after surgery to keep them comfortable.</p><h2>Bringing your child home</h2><p>Your child can go home when:</p> <ul><li>their heart rate, breathing, blood pressure and temperature are normal</li><li>they are able to eat without vomiting (throwing up)</li><li>they are comfortable taking oral (by mouth) pain medicine</li></ul><h2>What to bring to the hospital</h2> <p>Your child will already be <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1161&language=English">staying in the hospital</a>, so you do not need to bring anything on the day of the operation. But you may want to bring a toy that is special to your child. On the day they are released from the hospital, bring your child's car seat for the ride home.</p> <h2>Taking time off from work</h2> <p>It is difficult to plan how much time you will need to take off work. In most cases, however, you should be able to go back to work after about one week.</p> <h2>Before the surgery</h2> <p>Your child will not be allowed to eat or drink while under assessment for intussusception. This is especially important before surgery. Your child will have blood drawn and an intravenous (IV) inserted. The IV will keep your child hydrated. Also, the doctors will ask you for consent regarding surgery and will go over the risks of the surgery.</p>
Invagination intestinale : avant et après la chirurgieIInvagination intestinale : avant et après la chirurgieIntussusception: Before and after surgeryFrenchGastrointestinalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)Small Intestine;Large Intestine/ColonSmall intestine;Large intestineProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-11-17T05:00:00Z5B Practice Council -- The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids)8.0000000000000061.00000000000001256.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez davantage sur l’invagination intestinale et sur comment bien assurer des soins suivant l’intervention chirurgicale de votre enfant.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une invagination intestinale?</h2><p>L’invagination intestinale se produit lorsqu’une partie de l’intestin se replie sur elle-même comme un télescope, avec la pénétration d’un segment dans le segment sous-jacent. Ceci provoque un blocage, empêchant le passage de la nourriture dans l’intestin. Le fait que les parois de la section « télescopée » de l’intestin appuient l’une sur l’autre pendant une longue période peut irritater et faire enflurer. Par conséquent, l’alimentation du sang aux intestins pourrait être coupée, entraînant de graves dommages. Les symptômes de l’invagination intestinale peuvent comprendre la douleur sévère, les vomissements, ou le passage des selles sanglantes ou gélatineuses. Si le médecin de votre enfant estime qu’il présente une invagination intestinale, il réalisera un examen physique, examinera les antécédents médicaux et demandera de passer une échographie. </p> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Invagination</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Intussusception_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Une invagination se produit lorsqu'une partie de l'intestin se replie sur elle-même. Cela se produit habituellement à l'endroit où le gros intestin rejoint le petit intestin.</figcaption></figure><h2>À​ retenir<br></h2> <ul><li>L’invagination intestinale se produit lorsqu’une partie de l’intestin se replie sur elle-même comme un télescope. Ceci empêche le passage de la nourriture à travers l’intestin.</li> <li>Pendant qu'on examine l’invagination devotre enfant, il ne luisera pas permis de boire ou de manger. </li> <li>Avant l’intervention chirurgicale, une anesthésie générale sera administrée à votre enfant. C’est dans l’objectif de s’assurer que votre enfant restera endormi pendant toute l’intervention.</li> <li>Pour le soulagement de la douleur, vous pouvez donner à votre enfant de l’acétaminophène ou de l’ibuprofène pendant les 24 premières heures suivant l’intervention chirurgicale. Suivez les directives sur l’emballage.</li> <li>Si vous avez des préoccupations urgentes suivant l’intervention chirurgicale, rendez-vous ​​​au service d’urgence le plus proche.</li></ul><h2>Quand appeler l’équipe de chirurgie</h2><p>Après le retour à la maison, vous devriez surveiller l’enfant pour des signes d’infection ou de la récurrence de l’invagination intestinale. Le risque d’une récurrence de l’invagination intestinale est environ 10 %, le risque le plus important étant dans les 48 heures suivant la rectification de l’invagination. Le risque de récurrence est pourtant beaucoup moins important si une partie de l’intestin a été enlevée pendant l’intervention chirurgicale.</p><h3>Veuillez communiquer avec le bureau du chirurgien si vous remarquez tout signe d’infection. Cela comprend les signes suivants :</h3><ul><li> <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> de 38 °C (100,4 °F) ou plus;</li><li>rougeur autour du site de l’incision;</li><li>écoulement verdâtre ou jaunâtre au lieu de l’incision, accompagné d’une mauvaise odeur;</li><li>enflure autour du site de l’incision;</li><li>douleur accrue autour du site de l’incision; </li></ul><h3>Veuillez communiquer avec le bureau du chirurgien si vous remarquez tout signe de récurrence. Cela comprend les signes suivants :</h3><ul><li> <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a>;</li><li>sang dans les selles, ou des selles d’une apparence de gelée de groseilles;</li><li>douleurs abdominales;</li><li>fièvre de 38 °C (100.4 °F) ou plus;</li><li>distension abdominale (abdomen à apparence gonflée);</li><li>irritabilité ou difficulté à rester calme; </li></ul><p>Si vous avez une question ou une préoccupation non urgente, appelez le bureau du chirurgien pendant les heures ouvrables ou laissez un message après les heures ouvrées. Si la préoccupation est urgente, rendez-vous chez votre médecin de famille de votre enfant, chez un pédiatre, ou au service d’urgence le plus proche. </p><h2>Coordonnées des personnes-ressources importantes </h2><h3>Le chirurgien de mon enfant est :</h3><h3> Numéro de téléphone : </h3><h3>Le médecin de famille de mon enfant est :</h3><h3>Numéro de téléphone : </h3><h2>Traitement de l’invagination intestinale</h2> <p>Une fois l’invagination diagnostiquée chez votre enfant, le médecin décidera d'un plan de traitement, qui pourrait comprendre un lavement par insufflation d’air et/ou une intervention chirurgicale. </p> <h3>Lavement par insufflation d’air</h3> <p>Un lavement par insufflation d’air est effectué par un radiologue dans le service de radiologie. Pour le lavement par insufflation d’air, un petit tube mou, à travers lequel de l' air est insufflé, est inséré dans le rectum. L’air entre dans les intestins et tente de déplier la partie repliée pour défaire ainsi l’invagination. Parfois, il est nécessaire de répéter le processus du lavement par insufflation d’air. Votre enfant restera dans le service d’urgence pour observation. Si le lavement par insufflation d’air n’est pas le traitement approprié d’après les médecins, ou en cas d’échec , on pourrait alors décider d’effectuer une intervention chirurgicale sur votre enfant. </p><h2>Pendant l’opération</h2> <p>Une anesthésie générale sera administrée à votre enfant. L’anesthésie fera dormir votre enfant durant toute l’intervention et elle empêche à l’enfant de ressentir de la douleur. Avant l’intervention, votre enfant recevra également une dose d’antibiotique par voie intraveineuse.</p> <p>Pendant l’intervention chirurgicale, le chirurgien libérera la partie de l’intestin qui est « télescopée » et, si nécessaire, enlèvera tout tissu intestinal endommagé. Selon la situation, l’intervention pourrait être une chirurgie <a href="/Article?contentid=1005&language=French">laparoscopique</a> (en faisant plusieurs petites incisions) ou une chirurgie ouverte (en faisant une incision plus importante). </p> <p>L’incision sera fermée en se servant des petites bandes adhésives appelées Steri-Strips. </p> <h2>Après l’opération </h2> <p>Après l’intervention chirurgicale, votre enfant sera transféré à l'unité des soins post anesthésie, ou la salle de réveil où il reprendra connaissance. Vous pouvez rendre visite votre enfant une fois qu’il aura repris connaissance. Une fois réveillé, il sera transféré à l’unité des malades hospitalisés. </p> <p>On insérera un tube appelé une <a href="/Article?contentid=984&language=French">sonde nasogastrique</a> dans une des narines de votre enfant afin de garder son estomac vide pendant que ces intestins guérissent. Après l’intervention chirurgicale, des médicaments pour soulager la douleur lui seront administrés par voie IV afin de s’assurer de son confort. </p> <h2>Retour à la maison</h2> <p>Votre enfant peut retourner à la maison après qu’il satisfait aux conditions suivantes : </p> <ul><li>Son rythme cardiaque, sa respiration, sa tension artérielle et sa température sont normaux.</li> <li>Il est capable de manger sans vomir par la suite.</li> <li>Il peut avaler des médicaments contre la douleur sans ressentir de sensation de gêne. </li></ul><h2>Que faut-il apporter à l’hôpital ?</h2> <p>Étant donné que <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1161&language=French">votre enfant passera la nuit à l’hôpital</a>, vous n’avez pas besoin d’apporter des choses le jour de l’intervention chirurgicale. Vous pouvez cependant apporter le jouet préféré de votre enfant. Le jour du congé, apportez le siège de sécurité pour la voiture.</p> <h2>Prendre congé du travail</h2> <p>Il est difficile de prévoir la durée de congé qu’il vous faudra. Cependant, dans la plupart des cas, vous devriez être en mesure de reprendre le travail après environ une semaine.</p> <h2>Avant l’intervention chirurgicale </h2> <p>Pendant qu'on examine l’invagination de votre enfant, il ne lui sera pas permis de boire ou de manger. Ceci est important surtout avant l’intervention chirurgicale. On effectuera une prise de sang, et on lui placera une perfusion intraveineuse (IV). La perfusion IV gardera votre enfant hydraté. De plus, le médecin demandera votre consentement pour l’intervention chirurgicale et vous parlera des risques de cette intervention. </p>

 

 

Invagination intestinale : avant et après la chirurgie958.000000000000Invagination intestinale : avant et après la chirurgieIntussusception: Before and after surgeryIFrenchGastrointestinalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years)Small Intestine;Large Intestine/ColonSmall intestine;Large intestineProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-11-17T05:00:00Z5B Practice Council -- The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids)8.0000000000000061.00000000000001256.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez davantage sur l’invagination intestinale et sur comment bien assurer des soins suivant l’intervention chirurgicale de votre enfant.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une invagination intestinale?</h2><p>L’invagination intestinale se produit lorsqu’une partie de l’intestin se replie sur elle-même comme un télescope, avec la pénétration d’un segment dans le segment sous-jacent. Ceci provoque un blocage, empêchant le passage de la nourriture dans l’intestin. Le fait que les parois de la section « télescopée » de l’intestin appuient l’une sur l’autre pendant une longue période peut irritater et faire enflurer. Par conséquent, l’alimentation du sang aux intestins pourrait être coupée, entraînant de graves dommages. Les symptômes de l’invagination intestinale peuvent comprendre la douleur sévère, les vomissements, ou le passage des selles sanglantes ou gélatineuses. Si le médecin de votre enfant estime qu’il présente une invagination intestinale, il réalisera un examen physique, examinera les antécédents médicaux et demandera de passer une échographie. </p> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Invagination</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Intussusception_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Une invagination se produit lorsqu'une partie de l'intestin se replie sur elle-même. Cela se produit habituellement à l'endroit où le gros intestin rejoint le petit intestin.</figcaption></figure><h2>À​ retenir<br></h2> <ul><li>L’invagination intestinale se produit lorsqu’une partie de l’intestin se replie sur elle-même comme un télescope. Ceci empêche le passage de la nourriture à travers l’intestin.</li> <li>Pendant qu'on examine l’invagination devotre enfant, il ne luisera pas permis de boire ou de manger. </li> <li>Avant l’intervention chirurgicale, une anesthésie générale sera administrée à votre enfant. C’est dans l’objectif de s’assurer que votre enfant restera endormi pendant toute l’intervention.</li> <li>Pour le soulagement de la douleur, vous pouvez donner à votre enfant de l’acétaminophène ou de l’ibuprofène pendant les 24 premières heures suivant l’intervention chirurgicale. Suivez les directives sur l’emballage.</li> <li>Si vous avez des préoccupations urgentes suivant l’intervention chirurgicale, rendez-vous ​​​au service d’urgence le plus proche.</li></ul><h2>Prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison</h2> <h3>Soin de l’incision</h3> <p>L’incision sera couverte de pansements appelés Steri-Strips. Vous n’avez pas à prendre soin du pansement Steri-Strips. Il est normal de voir une petite quantité de sang sortir du pansement Steri-Strips. Si le sang a l’air frais ou si la quantité du sang augmente, appuyez sur l’incision avec une serviette propre et sèche pendant 5 minutes. Appelez ensuite le bureau du chirurgien. Si le saignement ne s’arrête pas, rendez-vous chez votre médecin de famille ou au service d’urgence le plus proche.</p> <p>Les Steri-Strips tomberont tout seuls. Si les Steri-Strips ne sont pas tombés tout seuls au bout de 7 ou 10 jours suivant l’intervention chirurgicale, vous pouvez les enlever vous-même.</p> <h3>Activités</h3> <p>Votre enfant peut reprendre toutes ses activités habituelles aussitôt qu’il s’y sent prêt</p> <h3>Alimentation</h3> <p>Votre enfant devrait être en mesure de reprendre une alimentation normale après l’intervention chirurgicale. S’il a de la difficulté à manger, communiquez avec le bureau du chirurgien.</p> <h3>Médicaments pour soulagement de la douleur</h3> <p>Lorsque votre enfant revient à la maison, vous pouvez lui donner de l’<a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=62&language=French">acétaminophène</a> ou de l’<a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=153&language=French">ibuprofène</a> pendant les 24 premières heures suivant l’intervention chirurgicale. Pour l’administration de ces médicaments, suivez les directives sur l’emballage. </p> <h3>Bain </h3> <p>Votre enfant peut recommencer à prendre des bains 48 heures après l’intervention. </p> <h2>Retour à la garderie ou à l’école </h2> <p>Votre enfant peut retourner à la garderie ou à l’école dès qu’il se sent à l’aise et que vous sentez à l’aise qu’il reprenne sa routine normale. </p><h2>Quand appeler l’équipe de chirurgie</h2><p>Après le retour à la maison, vous devriez surveiller l’enfant pour des signes d’infection ou de la récurrence de l’invagination intestinale. Le risque d’une récurrence de l’invagination intestinale est environ 10 %, le risque le plus important étant dans les 48 heures suivant la rectification de l’invagination. Le risque de récurrence est pourtant beaucoup moins important si une partie de l’intestin a été enlevée pendant l’intervention chirurgicale.</p><h3>Veuillez communiquer avec le bureau du chirurgien si vous remarquez tout signe d’infection. Cela comprend les signes suivants :</h3><ul><li> <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> de 38 °C (100,4 °F) ou plus;</li><li>rougeur autour du site de l’incision;</li><li>écoulement verdâtre ou jaunâtre au lieu de l’incision, accompagné d’une mauvaise odeur;</li><li>enflure autour du site de l’incision;</li><li>douleur accrue autour du site de l’incision; </li></ul><h3>Veuillez communiquer avec le bureau du chirurgien si vous remarquez tout signe de récurrence. Cela comprend les signes suivants :</h3><ul><li> <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a>;</li><li>sang dans les selles, ou des selles d’une apparence de gelée de groseilles;</li><li>douleurs abdominales;</li><li>fièvre de 38 °C (100.4 °F) ou plus;</li><li>distension abdominale (abdomen à apparence gonflée);</li><li>irritabilité ou difficulté à rester calme; </li></ul><p>Si vous avez une question ou une préoccupation non urgente, appelez le bureau du chirurgien pendant les heures ouvrables ou laissez un message après les heures ouvrées. Si la préoccupation est urgente, rendez-vous chez votre médecin de famille de votre enfant, chez un pédiatre, ou au service d’urgence le plus proche. </p><h2>Coordonnées des personnes-ressources importantes </h2><h3>Le chirurgien de mon enfant est :</h3><h3> Numéro de téléphone : </h3><h3>Le médecin de famille de mon enfant est :</h3><h3>Numéro de téléphone : </h3><h2>Traitement de l’invagination intestinale</h2> <p>Une fois l’invagination diagnostiquée chez votre enfant, le médecin décidera d'un plan de traitement, qui pourrait comprendre un lavement par insufflation d’air et/ou une intervention chirurgicale. </p> <h3>Lavement par insufflation d’air</h3> <p>Un lavement par insufflation d’air est effectué par un radiologue dans le service de radiologie. Pour le lavement par insufflation d’air, un petit tube mou, à travers lequel de l' air est insufflé, est inséré dans le rectum. L’air entre dans les intestins et tente de déplier la partie repliée pour défaire ainsi l’invagination. Parfois, il est nécessaire de répéter le processus du lavement par insufflation d’air. Votre enfant restera dans le service d’urgence pour observation. Si le lavement par insufflation d’air n’est pas le traitement approprié d’après les médecins, ou en cas d’échec , on pourrait alors décider d’effectuer une intervention chirurgicale sur votre enfant. </p><h2>Pendant l’opération</h2> <p>Une anesthésie générale sera administrée à votre enfant. L’anesthésie fera dormir votre enfant durant toute l’intervention et elle empêche à l’enfant de ressentir de la douleur. Avant l’intervention, votre enfant recevra également une dose d’antibiotique par voie intraveineuse.</p> <p>Pendant l’intervention chirurgicale, le chirurgien libérera la partie de l’intestin qui est « télescopée » et, si nécessaire, enlèvera tout tissu intestinal endommagé. Selon la situation, l’intervention pourrait être une chirurgie <a href="/Article?contentid=1005&language=French">laparoscopique</a> (en faisant plusieurs petites incisions) ou une chirurgie ouverte (en faisant une incision plus importante). </p> <p>L’incision sera fermée en se servant des petites bandes adhésives appelées Steri-Strips. </p> <h2>Après l’opération </h2> <p>Après l’intervention chirurgicale, votre enfant sera transféré à l'unité des soins post anesthésie, ou la salle de réveil où il reprendra connaissance. Vous pouvez rendre visite votre enfant une fois qu’il aura repris connaissance. Une fois réveillé, il sera transféré à l’unité des malades hospitalisés. </p> <p>On insérera un tube appelé une <a href="/Article?contentid=984&language=French">sonde nasogastrique</a> dans une des narines de votre enfant afin de garder son estomac vide pendant que ces intestins guérissent. Après l’intervention chirurgicale, des médicaments pour soulager la douleur lui seront administrés par voie IV afin de s’assurer de son confort. </p> <h2>Retour à la maison</h2> <p>Votre enfant peut retourner à la maison après qu’il satisfait aux conditions suivantes : </p> <ul><li>Son rythme cardiaque, sa respiration, sa tension artérielle et sa température sont normaux.</li> <li>Il est capable de manger sans vomir par la suite.</li> <li>Il peut avaler des médicaments contre la douleur sans ressentir de sensation de gêne. </li></ul><h2>Que faut-il apporter à l’hôpital ?</h2> <p>Étant donné que <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1161&language=French">votre enfant passera la nuit à l’hôpital</a>, vous n’avez pas besoin d’apporter des choses le jour de l’intervention chirurgicale. Vous pouvez cependant apporter le jouet préféré de votre enfant. Le jour du congé, apportez le siège de sécurité pour la voiture.</p> <h2>Prendre congé du travail</h2> <p>Il est difficile de prévoir la durée de congé qu’il vous faudra. Cependant, dans la plupart des cas, vous devriez être en mesure de reprendre le travail après environ une semaine.</p> <h2>Avant l’intervention chirurgicale </h2> <p>Pendant qu'on examine l’invagination de votre enfant, il ne lui sera pas permis de boire ou de manger. Ceci est important surtout avant l’intervention chirurgicale. On effectuera une prise de sang, et on lui placera une perfusion intraveineuse (IV). La perfusion IV gardera votre enfant hydraté. De plus, le médecin demandera votre consentement pour l’intervention chirurgicale et vous parlera des risques de cette intervention. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Intussusception_MED_ILL_EN.jpgInvagination intestinale : avant et après la chirurgieFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.