WartsWWartsWartsEnglishDermatologySchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-05-13T04:00:00Z6.4000000000000069.90000000000001185.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the types of skin warts, what causes warts, how to prevent warts and what common treatments are used.<br></p><h2>What are warts?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Common warts</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Warts_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="A hand with warts on the fingers and a close-up of warts around the fingernail" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Common warts are usually found on the fingers, toes and knees. They make up about 70 per cent of warts.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Warts are common, harmless growths of skin that occur in roughly 10 per cent of all children. They are caused by a virus called <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=English">human papillomavirus (HPV)</a>. Warts are caused by the rapid growth of skin as a result of the virus. They are not cancer. </p><p>Normally, warts are found on the top layer of skin (epidermis). They may look different depending on what area of the body they are on. They can often have small black or dark red spots in the center. These spots are very small clotted blood vessels. </p><p>Some warts can cause pain and bleeding, especially the plantar type on the bottom of the feet.</p><p>Warts are most common in people between the ages of five and 20 years.</p><p>Generally, your child's doctor can diagnose a wart by looking at it. Your child will not usually need special tests.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Warts are common growths of skin. </li> <li>Warts are caused by a virus called human papilloma virus (HPV). They can spread. </li> <li>Warts often go away on their own. </li> <li>Wart treatment may or may not work. </li> </ul><h2>Treatment of warts</h2><h3>Option not to treat</h3><p>Viral warts will often go away on their own, but they can also persist for years. They are not dangerous. Depending on where they are located in the body, they may cause pain and discomfort, or people can be unhappy with how they look. How long it takes for warts to go away on their own varies and cannot be predicted.</p><h3>Option to treat</h3><p>There is no treatment to cure HPV, the cause of warts. Most treatments kill the cells that contain the virus. If treatments are started, the aim is to remove the wart without scarring. </p><p>Because some warts go away on their own, stronger treatments are often not used, except with plantar warts. Also, treatments can be painful and may not work well. People may need multiple treatments to remove the wart entirely.<br></p><p>There is no treatment that is considered "the best" at removing warts. Your doctor may choose different treatments depending on the age of your child, where the wart is located or what has been used so far.</p><h4>Treatments to use at home</h4><ul><li>Salicylic acid wart removal products can be purchased without a prescription at a pharmacy (there are many brands available). There are also prescription forms of salicylic acid. Apply the product once per day to the area of the wart. Usually, it is not applied to the face, genitals or normal skin unless directed by a doctor. The salicylic acid will make the wart turn into dead skin (the skin will look white). </li><li>Duct tape or other airtight tape may be used. This can be combined with other treatments, such as applying duct tape over the salicylic acid product. The use of duct tape alone for management of warts is not very effective.</li><li>Other medications such as podophyllotoxin, topical retinoids (such as tretinoin or tazarotene), cimetidine, imiquimod or sinecatechins might also be prescribed by your doctor. </li></ul><h4>Doctor's office treatments<br></h4><ul><li>Higher concentrations of salicylic acid can be applied to the wart by your doctor.</li><li>Liquid nitrogen, also called cryotherapy, is a common treatment for warts. The liquid nitrogen is very cold, and it freezes or burns the wart. After, the skin will likely blister and scab. When the scab comes off, the wart can come with it. This treatment is quick but can also be painful. For this reason, it is not often done in young children. Multiple treatments, or use of other treatments at the same time, are commonly necessary.</li><li>Other treatments applied in the doctor's office include <a href="/Article?contentid=86&language=English">bleomycin</a> injections, podophyllotoxin, candida injections and cantharone.</li></ul><h4>Not-so-common treatments<br></h4><ul><li>Electrosurgery with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser requires a pain medicine called a local anaesthetic. </li><li>Photodynamic therapy involves two steps: applying a prescription cream and then exposing the wart to a specific type of light. This is used for warts resistant to other treatments.</li><li>Surgery is very rarely used, as it may increase the chances that the virus may spread in the skin. </li></ul><h2>When does a wart need to be seen by a doctor?</h2><p>See your child's doctor if:</p><ul><li>warts develop on the genital area or around the anus</li><li>plantar warts are painful or cause discomfort when walking</li><li>warts develop on the face</li><li>any warts are causing pain or distress</li></ul><p>For further information about warts, see the following resource from the Society for Pediatric Dermatology: "<a href="https://pedsderm.net/site/assets/files/1028/4_spd_warts_web_final.pdf">Warts (verruca vulgaris) and what to do about them"</a>.</p><h2>References</h2><p>Schmitt, B. <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494586">Warts</a>. American Academy of Pediatrics, Pediatric Patient Education. Retrieved from <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494586">https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494586</a>.</p><p>Boull, C. and Groth, D. Update: Treatment of Cutaneous Viral Warts in Children. <em>Pediatric Dermatology</em> (2011). <em>28</em>(3), 213-217.</p>
VerruesVVerruesWartsFrenchDermatologySchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-12-29T05:00:00Z6.0000000000000074.0000000000000725.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez les différents types de verrues de la peau, ce qui les cause, comment les éviter et les traitements courants utilisés.<br></p><h2>Que sont les verrues?</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Verrues vulgaires</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Warts_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Une main avec des verrues sur les doigts et un gros plan des verrues autour de l’ongle" /><figcaption class="“asset-image-caption”">Les verrues vulgaires se retrouvent habituellement sur les doigts, les orteils et les genoux. Elles représentent environ 70 % des verrues.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Les verrues sont des excroissances de peau; elles sont courantes et sans gravité. Elles sont causées par un virus appelé le virus du papillome humain (VPH). Les verrues sont causées par la croissance rapide de la peau en raison du virus. Il ne s’agit pas de cancers.</p><p>Habituellement, les verrues se trouvent sur la couche supérieure de la peau (épiderme). Elles peuvent avoir une apparence différente selon la région du corps où elles sont présentent. Elles ont souvent de petits points noirs ou rouge foncé dans leur centre. Ces points sont de très petits vaisseaux sanguins coagulés.</p><p>Certaines verrues peuvent être douloureuses et saigner, surtout dans le cas de verrues plantaires sous la plante des pieds.</p><p>Les verrues sont plus courantes chez les personnes de 5 à 20 ans.</p><p>En général, le médecin de votre enfant peut diagnostiquer une verrue en l’observant. Votre enfant n’aura pas besoin de subir d’examens particuliers.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Les verrues sont des excroissances courantes de la peau.</li><li>Les verrues sont causées par le VPH. Elles sont contagieuses. </li><li>Les verrues partent souvent d’elles-mêmes.</li><li>Le traitement contre une verrue peut fonctionner ou pas.<br></li></ul><h2>Traitement des verrues</h2><h3>Vous pouvez choisir de ne pas traiter</h3><p>Les verrues virales partent souvent d’elles-mêmes. Elles peuvent aussi persister pendant des années si elles ne sont pas traitées.</p><h3>Vous pouvez décider de traiter les verrues</h3><p>Il n’existe aucun traitement pour soigner le VPH, la cause des verrues. La plupart des traitements tuent les cellules qui contiennent le virus. Le traitement vise à retirer les verrues sans laisser de cicatrice.</p><p>Certaines verrues s’estompent d’elles-mêmes; c’est pourquoi des traitements forts sont rarement utilisés, sauf dans le cas de verrues plantaires. De plus, les traitements peuvent être douloureux et ne fonctionnent pas toujours.</p><h4>Traitements courants</h4><ul><li>Du ruban hermétique (type Duct ou autre) peut être utilisé pour enlever les verrues.</li></ul><h4>Traitements chez le médecin</h4><ul><li>Acide salicylique ou acide lactique sur la verrue. Cela peut prendre jusqu’à trois mois ou plus d’utilisation avec précautions. </li><li>Azote liquide, aussi appelé cryothérapie. De l’azote liquide très froid est appliqué sur la verrue. L’azote liquide fait en sorte que la peau forme une ampoule, puis une croûte. Lorsque la croûte tombe, la verrue tombe au même moment. Ce traitement est rapide, mais peut aussi être douloureux. Parfois le traitement échoue et il faut le recommencer.</li><li>D’autres traitements comprennent des injections de bléomycine, la cimétidine, l’imiquimod, le cantharone et l’acide rétinoïque ou Tarazotène.</li></ul><h4>Traitements plus rares</h4><ul><li>Dans le cas de l’électrochirurgie avec laser au dioxyde de carbone (CO2), il faut utiliser des médicaments contre la douleur appelée un anesthésique local.</li><li>La chirurgie est rarement utilisée, puisqu’elle peut augmenter les risques que le virus se propage.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Warts788.000000000000WartsWartsWEnglishDermatologySchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-05-13T04:00:00Z6.4000000000000069.90000000000001185.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the types of skin warts, what causes warts, how to prevent warts and what common treatments are used.<br></p><h2>What are warts?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Common warts</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Warts_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="A hand with warts on the fingers and a close-up of warts around the fingernail" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Common warts are usually found on the fingers, toes and knees. They make up about 70 per cent of warts.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Warts are common, harmless growths of skin that occur in roughly 10 per cent of all children. They are caused by a virus called <a href="/Article?contentid=25&language=English">human papillomavirus (HPV)</a>. Warts are caused by the rapid growth of skin as a result of the virus. They are not cancer. </p><p>Normally, warts are found on the top layer of skin (epidermis). They may look different depending on what area of the body they are on. They can often have small black or dark red spots in the center. These spots are very small clotted blood vessels. </p><p>Some warts can cause pain and bleeding, especially the plantar type on the bottom of the feet.</p><p>Warts are most common in people between the ages of five and 20 years.</p><p>Generally, your child's doctor can diagnose a wart by looking at it. Your child will not usually need special tests.</p><h2>There are three general types of skin warts</h2> <ul> <li>Common warts are usually found on the fingers, toes and knees. They make up about 70 per cent of warts. </li> <li>Plantar warts are found on the pressure points on the bottom of the feet. They make up about 30 per cent of warts. </li> <li>Flat warts make up about 4 per cent of warts. They are usually smoother in appearance than common or plantar warts. They usually appear on the face, but they can be found on other body parts. They mostly affect children and young adults. </li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Warts are common growths of skin. </li> <li>Warts are caused by a virus called human papilloma virus (HPV). They can spread. </li> <li>Warts often go away on their own. </li> <li>Wart treatment may or may not work. </li> </ul><h2>Warts can grow in size from weeks to months</h2><p>Warts vary considerably in size. They are rarely larger than 10 mm (0.4 inches) from side to side.</p><h2>Warts spread easily</h2><p>There are more than 50 types of HPV. HPV can pass to another person from skin-to-skin contact. HPV can also be passed through contact with an object such as a towel. </p><h2>Treatment of warts</h2><h3>Option not to treat</h3><p>Viral warts will often go away on their own, but they can also persist for years. They are not dangerous. Depending on where they are located in the body, they may cause pain and discomfort, or people can be unhappy with how they look. How long it takes for warts to go away on their own varies and cannot be predicted.</p><h3>Option to treat</h3><p>There is no treatment to cure HPV, the cause of warts. Most treatments kill the cells that contain the virus. If treatments are started, the aim is to remove the wart without scarring. </p><p>Because some warts go away on their own, stronger treatments are often not used, except with plantar warts. Also, treatments can be painful and may not work well. People may need multiple treatments to remove the wart entirely.<br></p><p>There is no treatment that is considered "the best" at removing warts. Your doctor may choose different treatments depending on the age of your child, where the wart is located or what has been used so far.</p><h4>Treatments to use at home</h4><ul><li>Salicylic acid wart removal products can be purchased without a prescription at a pharmacy (there are many brands available). There are also prescription forms of salicylic acid. Apply the product once per day to the area of the wart. Usually, it is not applied to the face, genitals or normal skin unless directed by a doctor. The salicylic acid will make the wart turn into dead skin (the skin will look white). </li><li>Duct tape or other airtight tape may be used. This can be combined with other treatments, such as applying duct tape over the salicylic acid product. The use of duct tape alone for management of warts is not very effective.</li><li>Other medications such as podophyllotoxin, topical retinoids (such as tretinoin or tazarotene), cimetidine, imiquimod or sinecatechins might also be prescribed by your doctor. </li></ul><h4>Doctor's office treatments<br></h4><ul><li>Higher concentrations of salicylic acid can be applied to the wart by your doctor.</li><li>Liquid nitrogen, also called cryotherapy, is a common treatment for warts. The liquid nitrogen is very cold, and it freezes or burns the wart. After, the skin will likely blister and scab. When the scab comes off, the wart can come with it. This treatment is quick but can also be painful. For this reason, it is not often done in young children. Multiple treatments, or use of other treatments at the same time, are commonly necessary.</li><li>Other treatments applied in the doctor's office include <a href="/Article?contentid=86&language=English">bleomycin</a> injections, podophyllotoxin, candida injections and cantharone.</li></ul><h4>Not-so-common treatments<br></h4><ul><li>Electrosurgery with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser requires a pain medicine called a local anaesthetic. </li><li>Photodynamic therapy involves two steps: applying a prescription cream and then exposing the wart to a specific type of light. This is used for warts resistant to other treatments.</li><li>Surgery is very rarely used, as it may increase the chances that the virus may spread in the skin. </li></ul><h2>How can I prevent warts from happening?</h2><ul><li>Moisturize hands and feet to prevent breaks in the skin. Tiny breaks in the skin let the virus infect the upper layer of the skin. This is why so many warts are seen on the fingers, palms and soles of the feet. </li><li>Keep hands and feet dry. </li><li>When in a public pool or shower, wear water shoes. The virus does very well in warm moist conditions. It is easy to pass it from person to person in pools and public showers. </li><li>If you do have a wart on your hands or feet, keep it covered when in a public place. </li></ul><h2>How do I prevent the warts from spreading on my child or to other children?</h2><ul><li>Discourage your child from picking the wart. They may spread the wart virus to other areas of their body.</li><li>Avoid baths or hot tubs with other children. Warm, moist conditions make it easier to spread the virus that causes warts.</li><li>Avoid sharing towels or sports equipment.</li><li>If your child is picking or scratching their wart, make sure your child's fingernails are cut short, and wash their hands regularly.</li><li>If your child has a wart on their hands or feet, keep it covered when in a public place.</li></ul><h2>When does a wart need to be seen by a doctor?</h2><p>See your child's doctor if:</p><ul><li>warts develop on the genital area or around the anus</li><li>plantar warts are painful or cause discomfort when walking</li><li>warts develop on the face</li><li>any warts are causing pain or distress</li></ul><p>For further information about warts, see the following resource from the Society for Pediatric Dermatology: "<a href="https://pedsderm.net/site/assets/files/1028/4_spd_warts_web_final.pdf">Warts (verruca vulgaris) and what to do about them"</a>.</p><h2>References</h2><p>Schmitt, B. <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494586">Warts</a>. American Academy of Pediatrics, Pediatric Patient Education. Retrieved from <a href="https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494586">https://patiented.solutions.aap.org/handout.aspx?gbosid=494586</a>.</p><p>Boull, C. and Groth, D. Update: Treatment of Cutaneous Viral Warts in Children. <em>Pediatric Dermatology</em> (2011). <em>28</em>(3), 213-217.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/warts.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/warts.jpgWartsFalse