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COVID-19 vaccination for ages under fiveCOVID-19 vaccination for ages under fiveCOVID-19 vaccination for ages under fiveCEnglishInfectious DiseasesBaby (1-12 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2022-08-11T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the status of the COVID-19 vaccine for children under five years of age and the benefits of getting the vaccine for this age group.</p><h2>Is there a COVID-19 vaccine available for children under five years of age?</h2><p>Yes. On July 14, 2022, Health Canada authorized Moderna’s Spikevax for use as a two-dose primary series in children six months to five years of age, and a three-dose primary vaccine series in those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised. “Primary vaccine series” refers to the initial number of doses of a particular vaccine that a person needs. It does not include booster dose(s).</p><p>This is the first COVID-19 vaccine authorized in Canada for use in children under the age of five years.</p><p>Looking for general information on COVID-19 vaccines. Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a>.</p><p>Looking for information specific to children aged five to 11? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4001&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)</a>.</p><p>Looking for information specific to youth age 12+? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4000&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)</a>.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Health Canada has authorized Moderna’s Spikevax for use as a two-dose primary series in children six months to five years of age, and a three-dose primary vaccine series in those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised.</li><li>Vaccination is recommended ahead of the start of the school year and upcoming respiratory virus season.</li><li>Neonates are more at risk of hospital admission because they have an immature immune system that has difficulty combatting disease.</li><li>Infants under six months of age can receive protection through immunization of the parent during pregnancy and subsequently through breastfeeding (more information for this age group is available later in the article).</li> </ul> <h2>What do we know about the Moderna vaccine?</h2><p>Clinical trial findings show that Moderna’s vaccine, which is 25 micrograms (half the dose given to the age six to 11 group), produces an immune response in children under five equal to the immune response seen in young adults 18 to 25 years of age who receive the 100-microgram dose primary series. Preliminary efficacy of the vaccine in preventing symptomatic COVID-19 when Omicron is the dominant variant is estimated at 50.6 per cent in children six to 23 months of age and 36.8 per cent in children two to five years of age starting 14 days after the second dose.</p><p> <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/naci-summary-july-14-2022.pdf">More information is available in this summary document</a> from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization.</p><h2>What are the side effects of the vaccine?</h2><p>In the clinical trial, 4,792 children aged between six months to five years of age received the vaccine. Side effects were similar to those seen with other vaccines given at that age, including irritability or crying, pain at the injection site, sleepiness, and loss of appetite.</p><h2>Should I be concerned about myocarditis side effects in this age group?</h2><p>In the vaccine trial for children under 6 years of age, there were no reported incidents of myocarditis. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis have been seen extremely rarely in children aged five to 11 years of age, and thus the risk for younger children is anticipated to be low. There are multiple surveillance mechanisms in place in order to monitor any potential post-vaccination risk of these conditions over time in younger children.</p><h2>Is there another vaccine for this age group currently under review by Health Canada?</h2><p>Yes, a vaccine developed by Pfizer is currently under review by Health Canada and a decision is expected in the coming weeks to months.</p><h2>Should I wait for the Pfizer vaccine?</h2><p>If you have decided to vaccinate your child, the first vaccine that is available is the best option to provide protection as soon as possible.</p><h2>What is the risk to children under five years old from COVID-19?</h2><p>With the spread of the Omicron variant, there have been more cases of children under age five in hospital with COVID-19 than earlier in the pandemic.</p><p>Children who have had COVID-19 are at risk of experiencing multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), a rare but serious complication that usually requires hospitalization. Although children with an underlying medical condition are at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19, this can still occur in children who were previously healthy. Severe disease and MIS-C can occur in any child, whether they have an underlying condition or not.</p><p>Further, all Individuals can help protect vulnerable members of their family, including children and youth, by ensuring that they and everyone around them are vaccinated against COVID-19.</p><p>Read the full <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-moderna-spikevax-covid-19-vaccine-children-6-months-5-years.pdf">Advisory Committee Statement</a> from NACI for more information.</p><h2>Why vaccinate my child if COVID-19 has already infected most of my household members?</h2><p>Many people are getting COVID-19 more than once. Studies in adults, which bode well for children, show that vaccination following infection provides stronger and longer-lasting protection from COVID-19 than infection alone. In addition, vaccination may provide further protection ahead of the start of the school year and upcoming respiratory virus season.</p><h2>Can my child receive the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as another vaccine?</h2><p>Vaccinating children against a multitude of diseases is an important way to keep them healthy; however, for now, NACI recommends vaccination against COVID-19 either 14 days before or after a different vaccine. Please ensure your child remains <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1986&language=English">up to date with all their vaccinations</a>.</p><h2>If I’ve recently had a booster dose of the vaccine and am currently breastfeeding, is it safe for my baby to be vaccinated?</h2><p>Yes. The antibodies from breast milk do not interfere with the immunity acquired from the vaccine, which will provide additional protection. Breastfeeding is not a contra-indication to receiving vaccines in infants who can receive them. There is no need to delay or time the vaccination differently.</p><h2>If my child is five years old, should they get the Moderna vaccine approved for ages six months to five years, or the Pfizer vaccine approved for ages five to 11 years?</h2><p>For children aged five years and above, it’s recommended that they receive the Pfizer vaccine approved for the five to 11 age group. Children aged six months to under five are recommended to receive the Moderna vaccine for this age group for both doses of the primary series.</p> <h2>Infants less than 6 months of age</h2><h3>Is there a vaccine for infants under six months of age?</h3><p>No. A vaccine for this age group would require clinical studies to determine the safety and benefits of vaccination. However, babies can receive protection through immunization of the parent during pregnancy and subsequently through breastfeeding.</p><h3>How can I protect my unborn baby from COVID-19?</h3><p>Neonates are more at risk of hospital admission because they have an <a href="https://www.cheo.on.ca/en/news/pregnant-individuals-urged-to-get-vaccinated-amid-hospitalization-of-infants-with-covid-19.aspx">immature immune system that has difficulty combatting disease</a>. If you are pregnant, vaccination is the best way to protect your baby from COVID-19. Vaccination enables you to pass on immunity to your baby while also protecting yourself.</p><h3>Does this immunity offer protection after the baby is born?</h3><p>Yes, it is well-recognized in other infectious diseases, such as flu and whooping cough (pertussis), that antibodies resulting from vaccination in a pregnant person provide protection for the first six months of an infant’s life. Multiple studies, including this <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7107e3.htm">from the U.S. CDC</a>, have also shown that infants born to those who are vaccinated have more antibodies against COVID-19 and are less likely to be admitted to the hospital with COVID-19. If the pregnant person has not been vaccinated or infected, the baby does not have the protection of antibodies transferred from the parent during the third trimester of pregnancy.</p><h3>Are there any risks or benefits to being vaccinated if I am breastfeeding?</h3><p> <a href="https://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ijgo.14008">Studies have shown</a> that there are no risks from receiving a COVID-19 vaccine in individuals who are breastfeeding. Studies have also shown that vaccinated individuals who are breastfeeding pass along antibodies in their breast milk, which may confer additional protection against COVID-19 to their child.</p><h2>If I have additional questions, who can I speak with to get the answers?</h2><p>Make an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a> to have a one-on-one phone appointment with a SickKids expert.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1155773108.jpgMain
COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1278968456.jpg2022-07-28T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the status of the COVID-19 vaccine for children five to 11 years of age and the benefits of getting the vaccine for children.</p><h2>What is the status of COVID-19 vaccines for children in Canada?</h2><p>In November 2021, Health Canada approved the use of the Pfizer vaccine for children five to 11 years of age.</p><p>In March 2022, Health Canada approved the use of the Moderna vaccine in children six to 11 years of age.</p><p>In July 2022, Health Canada approved the use of the Moderna vaccine in children under age five.</p><p>Looking for general information on COVID-19 vaccines. Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a>.</p> <p>Looking for information specific to children under five years of age? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4054&language=English">COVID-19 vaccination for ages under five</a>.</p> <p>Looking for information specific to youth age 12+? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4000&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)</a>.</p> <br> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Vaccines against COVID-19 have been shown to be safe and effective.</li><li>The Pfizer vaccine was approved for use in children five to 11 years of age in November 2021 and the Moderna vaccine was approved for children six to 11 years of age in March 2021.</li><li>Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) advises that the Pfizer vaccine is preferred for this age group and that the Moderna vaccine may be offered as an alternative.</li><li>Children get a smaller dose of the vaccine. They will still need to get two doses.</li><li>Side effects in younger children are similar to those seen in adults and older children.</li></ul><h2>What evidence is there that the vaccine is safe and effective for children?</h2><p>Over 3,000 children aged five to 11 received the vaccine through the Pfizer clinical trial and no serious side effects have been detected in the ongoing study after many months of follow-up. The vaccine was shown to be 91 per cent effective against symptomatic COVID-19 with mild side effects like those seen in adults and older children. These side effects include arm tenderness, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, chills and fever, which can also be seen with other vaccines recommended for children. Rare side effects that have been seen in older teens and young adults are expected to be extremely rare in children. Read about the <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298">clinical trial results in the New England Journal of Medicine</a>.</p><p>In the Moderna trial in children aged six to 11, over 3,000 children received the vaccine and preliminary data did not report any safety concerns. Side effects included injection site pain, headaches, tiredness, fever and muscle pain. The study showed that children had similar immune responses to adults aged 18 to 25 years old after receiving the vaccine, and an estimated efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 of 88 per cent 14 days after the first dose. Read about the <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2203315">clinical trial results in the New England Journal of Medicine</a>.</p><h2>Why should children get vaccinated if they do not get sick from COVID-19?</h2><p>Although severe illness due to acute COVID-19 infection is less frequent in children compared to adults, children can still be hospitalized and even require ICU-level care due to COVID-19. Getting the vaccine can protect children from severe illness and hospitalization.</p><p>A proportion of children who contract COVID-19 may go on to develop multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). While treatable and rare, approximately one in three children hospitalized with MIS-C will require ICU care. A study in the U.S. conducted in 2021 showed that the vaccine was highly effective in preventing the development of this serious condition in vaccinated youth (aged 12 to 18). The study showed that among the youth who were hospitalized with MIS-C, the vast majority were unvaccinated. This data bodes well for the prevention of MIS-C in vaccinated children aged five to 11 for which confirmatory studies are underway.</p><p>While long COVID rates are expected to be lower in children compared with adults, the full spectrum of manifestations of long COVID in children is still being determined.</p><h2>How can anyone be sure a vaccine developed so quickly is also safe?</h2><p>Work on coronavirus vaccines has been ongoing for more than 10 years, due in part to the SARS-CoV-1 outbreak in 2003. It was important to develop the COVID-19 vaccine quickly because of how many people were dying and getting sick, and because of the disruptions to everyday life as a result of the pandemic. Even though the vaccines were developed quickly, all the usual steps for the approval of vaccines occurred, including clinical trials with the appropriate number of participants. Because of the worldwide collaboration and large amount of resources that were made available to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, as well as the large number of COVID-19 cases the clinical trials were able to happen quickly. This made it easier to tell quickly whether or not the vaccines worked to prevent cases of COVID-19. The vaccine was rapidly shown to be effective in protecting against COVID-19.</p><h2>Are recent cases of hepatitis in children related to the COVID-19 vaccine?</h2><p>Beginning in early April 2022, the World Health Organization has reported an increase of new hepatitis cases of unknown origin in children not caused by known hepatitis viruses, such as hepatitis A, B, C and E. Side effects from the COVID-19 vaccines are not suspected, as the vast majority of affected children were too young and did not receive COVID-19 vaccination.</p><h2>Do children under 12 years of age need one vaccination or two? Is a different vaccine dose used in younger children?</h2><p>Children aged five to 11 years receive a two-dose schedule of a smaller Pfizer vaccine dose than the one used in people 12 and older (10 µg instead of 30µg). The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends that the second dose should be given at least eight weeks after the first dose. Children who turn 12 years before their second dose may receive an adult dose.</p><p>Children aged six to 11 receive a smaller Moderna vaccine dose (50µg instead of 100µg), four to eight weeks apart.</p><h2>My child is turning 12 years old in 2022. Now that a vaccine is approved for children under 12 years of age, should I wait to vaccinate my child when they are 12 years old and eligible for the adult dose?</h2><p>The first COVID-19 vaccine that is available for your child will be the best vaccine to get, as it will provide protection against COVID-19 to your child as soon as possible. Vaccine doses are based on age and the maturity of the immune system. The clinical trials (and real-world date since) showed the paediatric dose given to children aged five to 11 (a third of the dose given to people aged 12 and up), was effective and also resulted in fewer side effects.</p><h2>What if my child’s weight is above average in their age group?</h2><p>Vaccine doses are based on age and the maturity of the immune system, not weight. The clinical trials (and real-world data since) showed the paediatric dose given to children aged five to 11 (a third of the dose given to people aged 12 and up), was effective and also resulted in fewer side effects.</p><h2>How are COVID-19 cases trending among children?</h2><p>The virus causing COVID-19 continues to circulate and can lead to hospitalization in all age groups, especially in people who are not vaccinated. Vaccination helps protect children from developing severe illness and hospitalization from COVID-19 and its complications. Further, children who develop COVID-19 can pass the virus on to other people, including vulnerable adults such as grandparents or immunocompromised individuals.</p><h2>Can vaccination improve the physical and mental health of children?</h2><p> <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/research-covid-19-pandemic-impact-child-youth-mental-physical-health/">SickKids-led research</a> has shown a serious, sustained negative impact on the mental health of Ontario children, youth and their families due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Before the pandemic, a study showed that about 60 per cent of participants engaged in school sports and/or other extracurricular activities. During the pandemic, only 27 per cent participated in sports and 16 per cent in extracurriculars. These activities are known to boost physical and mental health. Vaccination will help return children to their regular activities and thus help improve the mental health and psychosocial well-being of children.</p><h2>My child is afraid of needles. What can I do to help?</h2><p>Some children have a very strong reaction to needles. If your child is worried about getting a needle, you can ask for special ways to support their vaccination, such as a longer appointment time or a private space for the injection. The CARD system (Comfort, Ask, Relax, Distract) may also help. It provides groups of strategies to reduce the pain, stress and worries associated with vaccinations to make the experience a more positive one. More information can be found at <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card">AboutKidsHealth.ca/card</a>. For children worried about pain, there are numbing creams and patches available at many pharmacies to help minimize needle discomfort.</p><h2>What can I do for my child who is sensory-sensitive?</h2><p>Sensory-sensitive vaccination clinics use some of the CARD strategies listed above to offer a calmer environment for each child, giving them as much time as they need and their own room to get the vaccine. Some clinics also offer sensory-sensitive appointments, offering dimmed lights, less noise and a slower pace, as well as privacy.</p><h2>Can the COVID-19 vaccine affect puberty or fertility in children?</h2><p>There is no evidence and no scientific reason to believe that the COVID-19 vaccine can affect puberty and fertility in children. Clinical trials of those who have been vaccinated in the general population have shown that the vaccine is very safe.</p><h2>What are the vaccine’s side effects in children under 12?</h2><p>Side effects from the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine are comparable to side effects your child may have experienced after other childhood vaccinations. These may include feeling tired, chills, muscle aches and pains, and a sore or red arm. The majority of children had very mild side effects or none at all. Typically these side effects will go away after a few days and there are no long-term side effects reported.</p><h2>What about reports of vaccine side effects like myocarditis and pericarditis in younger people?</h2><p>Myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) and pericarditis (inflammation of the heart’s outer lining) are rare and mostly seen in older adolescents and young adults. Both are extremely rare in relation to the COVID-19 vaccine. There were no reports of myocarditis or pericarditis in the Pfizer clinical trial for children five to 11 years old. Millions of children in Canada, the U.S. and other countries have received the vaccine with very few reports of these conditions, which are generally mild and benign. Myocarditis and pericarditis actually occur far more often after COVID-19 infection than after being vaccinated against COVID-19. Myocarditis and pericarditis occurring after COVID-19 vaccination is a generally mild and benign condition. There are multiple surveillance mechanisms in place in order to monitor any potential post-vaccination risk of these conditions over time.</p><p>The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends that the Pfizer vaccine should be preferred over the Moderna vaccine for children aged five to 11. Although the risk of myocarditis or pericarditis with the Moderna in children 6 to 11 years of age is currently unknown, the risk was found to be higher in older individuals than with the Pfizer vaccine.</p><p>Additional information about <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/pharmacy/sites/ca.pharmacy/files/uploads/files/myocarditis_and_pericarditis_after_covid-19_vaccines.pdf">myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID-19 vaccination</a> is available in this article from the University of Waterloo.</p><h2>Is vaccination safe for children with food allergies?</h2><p>Yes. There is no reason a child with a food allergy of any kind should not be vaccinated. Children with a history of allergy to foods, oral drugs, insect venom or environmental allergies can receive COVID-19 vaccines without any special precautions. If you are concerned about the possibility of an allergic reaction to any of the <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines/pfizer-biontech.html#a4">vaccine ingredients</a>, please consult your child’s primary health-care provider.</p><h2>Does the vaccine work against the Omicron variant?</h2><p>The Omicron variant is known to be much more transmissible than previous strains of COVID-19, but vaccination still protects against serious illness and hospitalization. The more people who are vaccinated against COVID-19, the more we can protect ourselves and prevent new variants from emerging and spreading in the community.</p><h2>Is the Omicron variant of COVID-19 causing more severe illness than previous strains?</h2><p>Most children and youth who have COVID-19 experience mild illness and do not require hospitalization. Those who are hospitalized typically require support for fever, dehydration and breathing difficulties. The increase in hospitalizations of COVID-positive patients is likely the result of widespread community transmission of COVID-19 due to the Omicron variant. While rare, some children and youth can get seriously ill after contracting COVID-19 and this is something we are monitoring closely.</p><h2>How effective is one dose of the vaccine against COVID-19?</h2><p>The COVID-19 vaccine is currently a two-dose series for children aged five to 11. While one dose provides partial protection in young individuals, it takes both doses to be considered fully vaccinated and optimize the protection provided by vaccination.</p><h2>Does the rapid spread of the Omicron variant mean children should receive their two vaccine doses at an interval shorter than the eight weeks recommended when it was approved in Canada?</h2><p>The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) currently recommends an eight-week interval, but parents may choose to vaccinate their children at a shorter interval (minimum 21 days) if they provide informed consent. If you are considering vaccinating your child at a shorter interval because of an underlying health condition or other reason, please discuss the matter with your child’s primary health-care provider. See <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/updated-recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-children-5-11-years-age.pdf">NACI’s updated recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines in children 5 to 11 years of age</a>.</p><h2>Is there advice you would give to families with children who are immunocompromised or have disabilities and medical complexity?</h2><p>Vaccination remains the best layer of protection against COVID-19 for everyone. It is important your child receives the vaccinations for which they are eligible. In Ontario, certain immunocompromised populations, including children aged five to 11, are eligible for a primary series of three doses. Read more about <a href="https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/coronavirus/docs/vaccine/COVID-19_vaccine_third_dose_recommendations.pdf">Ontario’s third-dose recommendations</a>. You can also talk to your child’s doctor or book an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a>.</p><h2>What is the current evidence for vaccination for COVID-19 in children with disabilities and medical complexity?</h2><p>Current evidence suggests that children with disabilities and medical complexity may be at an increased risk for severe illness or complications from COVID-19 based on their underlying condition making vaccination and prevention of COVID-19 especially important. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective for children with a wide variety of different medical conditions and complexities. Unexpected or severe side effects to the vaccine are very rare. If you have specific questions about your child’s medical condition and the COVID-19 vaccine, talk with your child’s doctor or book an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a>.</p><h2>What special considerations are there when vaccinating children with disabilities and medical complexity? Where can family caregivers find additional resources?</h2><p>Families should consider different strategies that have worked well with previous immunizations and create a plan to set their child up for success. Some questions to consider when scheduling your child’s vaccination appointment include:</p><ul><li>Does my child require a calmer environment? (i.e., privacy, quiet)</li><li>If applicable, is the vaccination clinic wheelchair accessible?</li><li>Which distraction techniques are typically most effective for my child (i.e., deep breathing, counting, watching a favourite video, stress balls)</li><li>What position will be most comfortable for my child during their vaccination (i.e., comfort holding, sitting with a caregiver, lying down)</li></ul><p>If family caregivers have questions related to vaccinating children with disabilities and medical complexity, you should first reach out to your child’s primary care physician. For additional questions after speaking with your child’s physician, you can book an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a>.</p><h2>Why do immunocompromised children benefit from additional vaccine doses?</h2><p>Similar to adults and with any other vaccine, the immune response to COVID-19 vaccines in children who are immunocompromised is not as strong as in people who are not immunocompromised. Therefore, they require additional vaccine doses to achieve appropriate protection. As immunocompromised people are at higher risk of complications and severe outcomes when infected with COVID-19, they are eligible for a higher number of doses and are strongly recommended to receive them all to maximize protection from COVID-19.</p><h2>Due to an underlying health condition, my child is at increased risk from side effects following any treatment or vaccination. What options are available to address this specific concern for my child?</h2><p>If you have specific concerns of this nature, it’s always best to speak with your primary health-care provider. Another option is to make an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a> to speak with a SickKids nurse. Additionally, if your child requires additional support or specialized care when receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, please email vaccine.consults@sickkids.ca and include the following information in your message: </p><ul><li>Name</li><li>Date of birth</li><li>Telephone number</li><li>Describe the considerations or accommodations that need to be in place for the patient</li></ul><h2>Should I be concerned that if my child takes an mRNA vaccine it could impact their eligibility for future specialized treatments for their condition?</h2><p>No. The vaccine will have no impact on future specialized treatments.<br></p><h2>I cannot decide if vaccinating my child is the right thing to do. Who can I talk to?</h2><p>Contact your child’s primary care provider or the SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service, a by-appointment phone service for Ontario residents that provides a safe, judgment-free space to have an open conversation about the COVID-19 vaccine with a paediatric registered nurse. Book an appointment online at <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">sickkids.ca/vaccineconsult</a> or by calling 1-888-304-6558.</p><p>For general information on COVID-19, please visit the <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/covid-19">COVID-19 learning hub</a>.</p><h2>Information on how to prepare and support your child with their COVID-19 vaccine</h2><p>CARD System Learning Hub<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain in children aged 18 months or over<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with comfort positions and distraction<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with numbing cream<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English</a></p><p>Pain relief: Comfort kit<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, February 26). COVID-19 Vaccination. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, March 8). Science Brief: Background Rationale and Evidence for Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html</a></p><p>Government of Ontario – Ministry of Health. (2020, March 31). COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario. Retrieved from <a href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario</a></p><p>Health Canada. (2021, October 18). Health Canada receives submission from Pfizer-BioNTech to authorize the use of Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine in children 5 to 11 years of age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html</a></p><p>ImmunizeBC. (2021, March 12). COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions">https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions</a></p><p>ImmunizeCanada. (2021, February 18). COVID-19 Info. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info">https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info</a></p><p>National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021, May 5). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 20). Pfizer and BioNTech Announce Positive Topline Results from Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 28). Pfizer and BioNTech Submit Initial Data to U.S. FDA From Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to <12 Years of Age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota</a>l</p><p>Public Health Agency of Canada. (2021, September 28). Advisory Committee Statement (ACS) National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI): Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Walter, E.B., Talaat, K.R., Sabharwal, C., Gurtman, A., Lockhart, S., Paulsen, G.C.,…Gruber, W.C., for the C4591007 Clinical Trial Group. (2021). Evaluation of the BNT162b2 Covid-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years of Age. <em>New England Journal of Medicine</em>. <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298">https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2021, February 19). COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines</a><br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1278968456.jpgCOVID-19 vaccine info for children (ages 5 to 11)Main
COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)CEnglishInfectious DiseasesTeen (13-18 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1302135365.jpg2022-07-28T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the status of COVID-19 vaccines for youth 12 to 17 years of age and the benefits of getting the vaccine for youth.<br></p><h2>What is the status of COVID-19 vaccines for youth in Canada?</h2><p>In May 2021, Health Canada approved the use of the Pfizer vaccine for all individuals older than 12 years of age.</p><p>Here are a few helpful resources about COVID-19 vaccines and youth.</p><ul><li> <a href="https://kidshealthfirst.ca/">COVID-19 Vaccines for Ontario Youth</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.toronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/97d6-COVID-19-Vaccine-Fact-Sheet-Youth.pdf">COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet for Youth Age 12 to 17</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.toronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/908c-CovidTeenVaxConsentInfographF.pdf">Does my 12+ Child Require Informed Consent to Receive Their Vaccine?</a></li></ul><p>Looking for general information on COVID-19 vaccines. Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a>.</p><p>Looking for information specific to children under five years of age? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4054&language=English">COVID-19 vaccination for ages under five</a>.</p> <p>Looking for information specific to children aged five to 11? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4001&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)</a>.</p> <br> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Vaccines against COVID-19 have been shown to be safe and effective against the disease.</li><li>Two of the vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, are approved for people 12 years of age and older.</li><li>The vaccine has been shown to prevent severe illness and hospitalization in youth aged 12 to 17.</li><li>Vaccinating youth aged 12 to 17 will help to prevent the transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.</li></ul><h2>Do you recommend that youth get the vaccine against COVID-19?</h2><p>Although they are less at risk than older people, some youth may still develop severe COVID-19, or may require hospitalization because of COVID-19. The vaccine has been shown to prevent severe illness and hospitalization in youth. Moreover, vaccinating youth will become important to reduce the transmission of the virus since they represent a large proportion of the population.</p><h2>Why do youth need the COVID-19 vaccine since they don’t get that sick if they become infected?</h2><p>While adults are at higher risk of complications from COVID-19, youth can still get infected and develop severe complications. Vaccination against COVID-19 prevents youth from being infected and may also prevent them from developing severe and long-term complications. Vaccination can also prevent youth from transmitting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.</p><h2>Can vaccination help prevent the occurrence of MIS-C?</h2><p>Multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) is a hyperinflammatory condition that is observed in some children and youth following COVID-19 infection. A study in the U.S. conducted in 2021 showed that the vaccine was highly effective at preventing the development of this serious condition in vaccinated youth (aged 12 to 18). The study showed that among the youth who were hospitalized with MIS-C, the vast majority were unvaccinated.</p><h2>Can vaccination improve the physical and mental health of youth?</h2><p>Getting vaccinated can help keep youth safe and healthy, return to their pre-pandemic activities, as well as limit the spread of COVID-19 to others in the community.</p><p> <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/research-covid-19-pandemic-impact-child-youth-mental-physical-health/">SickKids-led research</a> has shown a serious, sustained negative impact on the mental health of Ontario children, youth and their families due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Before the pandemic, a study showed that 58 per cent of participants engaged in school sports and/or other extracurricular activities. During the pandemic, only 27 per cent participated in sports and 16 per cent in extracurriculars. These activities are known to boost physical and mental health. Vaccination will help return children to their regular activities and thus help improve the mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of children.</p><h2>Is the risk of myocarditis or pericarditis greater from the vaccine or from COVID-19 for youth?</h2><p>In Canada, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends vaccination for youth and young adults who are eligible, as the benefits of vaccination to prevent COVID-19 and associated complications outweigh very rare cases of myocarditis/pericarditis following COVID-19 mRNA vaccination.</p><p>Additional information about <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/pharmacy/sites/ca.pharmacy/files/uploads/files/myocarditis_and_pericarditis_after_covid-19_vaccines.pdf">myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID-19 vaccination</a> is available in this article from the University of Waterloo.</p><p>A recent U.S. study found myocarditis rates with confirmed COVID-19 infection to be as high as 450 cases per million infections in young males aged 12 to 17 years, which is a much higher rate than from vaccination.</p><h2>Can the COVID-19 vaccine affect puberty and fertility in youth?</h2><p>No. There is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine can affect puberty and fertility in youth. Ongoing studies and surveillance of those who have been vaccinated in the general population have shown that the mRNA vaccines are very safe in youth aged 12 to 17.</p><p>For general information on COVID-19, please visit the <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/covid-19">COVID-19 learning hub</a>.</p><h2>Is vaccination safe for youth with food allergies?</h2><p>Yes. There is no reason a youth with a food allergy of any kind should not be vaccinated. Children with a history of allergy to foods, oral drugs, insect venom or environmental allergies can receive COVID-19 vaccines without any special precautions. If you are concerned about the possibility of an allergic reaction to any of the <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines/pfizer-biontech.html#a4">vaccine ingredients</a>, please consult your child’s primary health-care provider.</p><h2>Does the vaccine work against the Omicron variant?</h2><p>The Omicron variant is known to be much more transmissible than previous strains of COVID-19, but vaccination still protects against serious illness and hospitalization. The more people who are vaccinated against COVID-19, the more we can protect ourselves and prevent new variants from emerging and spreading in the community.</p><h2>Is the Omicron variant of COVID-19 causing more severe illness than previous strains?</h2><p>Studies are ongoing with respect to the severity of COVID-19 in children and youth due to the Omicron variant. However, most children and youth who have COVID-19 experience mild illness and do not require hospitalization. Those who are hospitalized typically require support for fever, dehydration and breathing difficulties. The increase in hospitalizations of COVID-positive patients is likely the result of widespread community transmission of COVID-19 due to the Omicron variant. While rare, some children and youth can get seriously ill after contracting COVID-19 and this is something we are monitoring closely.</p><h2>When will youth be eligible for a third (booster) dose of the vaccine?</h2><p>In Ontario, youth (ages 12 to 17) are eligible for a third (booster) dose as of February 18, 2022 as long as six months (168 days) have passed since their second dose.</p><h2>Can youth who are immunocompromised receive their fourth (booster) dose yet?</h2><p>Yes, anyone who meets the <a href="https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/coronavirus/docs/vaccine/COVID-19_vaccine_third_dose_recommendations.pdf">Ontario Ministry of Health criteria</a> for being moderately to severely immunocompromised, including youth aged 12 to 17, are eligible for a three-dose primary series and a fourth dose (booster) six months (168 days) after they complete a three-dose primary series.</p><h2>Why do immunocompromised youth benefit from additional vaccine doses?</h2><p>Similar to adults and with any other vaccine, the immune response to COVID-19 vaccines in youth who are immunocompromised is not as strong as in people who are not immunocompromised. Therefore, they require additional vaccine doses to achieve appropriate protection. As immunocompromised people are at higher risk of complications and severe outcomes when infected with COVID-19, they are eligible for a higher number of doses and are strongly recommended to receive them all to maximize protection from COVID-19.</p><h2>Due to an underlying health condition, my child is at increased risk from side effects following any treatment or vaccination. What options are available to address this specific concern for my child?</h2><p>If you have specific concerns of this nature, it’s always best to speak with your primary health-care provider. Another option is to make an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a> to speak with a SickKids nurse. Additionally, if your child requires additional support or specialized care when receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, please email vaccine.consults@sickkids.ca and include the following information in your message: </p><ul><li>Name</li><li>Date of birth</li><li>Telephone number</li><li>Describe the considerations or accommodations that need to be in place for the patient</li></ul><h2>Should I be concerned that if my child takes an mRNA vaccine it could impact their eligibility for future specialized treatments for their condition?</h2><p>No. The vaccine will have no impact on future specialized treatments.</p><h2>Information on how to prepare and support your child with their COVID-19 vaccine</h2><p>CARD System Learning Hub<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain in children aged 18 months or over<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with comfort positions and distraction<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with numbing cream<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English</a></p><p>Pain relief: Comfort kit<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, February 26). COVID-19 Vaccination. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, March 8). Science Brief: Background Rationale and Evidence for Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html</a></p><p>Government of Ontario – Ministry of Health. (2020, March 31). COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario. Retrieved from <a href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario</a></p><p>Health Canada. (2021, October 18). Health Canada receives submission from Pfizer-BioNTech to authorize the use of Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine in children 5 to 11 years of age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html</a></p><p>ImmunizeBC. (2021, March 12). COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions">https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions</a></p><p>ImmunizeCanada. (2021, February 18). COVID-19 Info. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info">https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info</a></p><p>National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021, May 5). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 20). Pfizer and BioNTech Announce Positive Topline Results from Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 28). Pfizer and BioNTech Submit Initial Data to U.S. FDA From Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to <12 Years of Age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota</a>l</p><p>Public Health Agency of Canada. (2021, September 28). Advisory Committee Statement (ACS) National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI): Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Walter, E.B., Talaat, K.R., Sabharwal, C., Gurtman, A., Lockhart, S., Paulsen, G.C.,…Gruber, W.C., for the C4591007 Clinical Trial Group. (2021). Evaluation of the BNT162b2 Covid-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years of Age. <em>New England Journal of Medicine</em>. <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298">https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2021, February 19). COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1302135365.jpgCOVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)Main
COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4054&language=English&hub=COVID-19"><figure class="asset-small"><img alt="Read COVID-19 vaccine information for children under five years of age" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID_Vaccine_info_under_five_thumbnail.jpg" /> </figure> </a> <p>This learning hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you and your child cope. Find general information on COVID-19 and articles and resources about vaccines and testing. Read the article to find more information about COVID-19 vaccines for children under five years of age.<br></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLfAK35c0XomtY0ixQrG3EjdwiCw8vOCUw"></iframe> </div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3907&language=English">Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3875&language=English">COVID-19 and chronic pain in children and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 vaccines</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about the COVID-19 vaccines that are available in Canada and about their safety and effectiveness.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3937&language=English">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4054&language=English">COVID-19 vaccination for ages under five</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4001&language=English">COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4000&language=English">COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.iphcc.ca/covid-19-f-a-q/">COVID-19 F.A.Q. (Indigenous Primary Health Care Council)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfAK35c0XomtY0ixQrG3EjdwiCw8vOCUw">SickKids COVID-19 vaccine consult service: Commonly asked questions (video playlist)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJ4tKxYISRk">Youth COVID-19 vaccination: What to expect (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/CARD_Vaccination_Handout.pdf">CARD handout: Coping with pain and fear around vaccination for teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/CARD_Vaccination_Poster.pdf">CARD poster: Coping with pain and fear around vaccination for teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines.html">Vaccines for COVID-19: Authorized vaccines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 testing</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information that will help you and your child prepare or either a saliva test or a nasopharyngeal swab.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/">Take this self-assessment if you were exposed to COVID-19 or have symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-test-and-testing-location-information">Ontario COVID-19 test and testing location information</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19%20Testing%20How%20to%20prepare%20and%20comfort%20your%20child.pdf">COVID-19 Testing: How to prepare and comfort your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ru-vFZdImes">Saliva testing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3908&language=English">After your child’s COVID-19 test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge (video)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://cmho.org/talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19/">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from and socialization with family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3882&language=English">COVID-19: Frequently asked questions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3888&language=English">Stressed adults and anxious young children: Supporting infants, toddlers and preschoolers through COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jwwwF9KQ7CQ">Parenting during COVID-19 and beyond (podcast)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3935&language=English">Keeping your child active during the COVID-19 pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/updated-covid19-school-operation-guidance-document-released/">SickKids - Updated guidance for school operation during the pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/sites/default/files/2020-07/HB-BackToSchool-Recommendations.pdf">Return to school recommendations for children with special needs (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1903&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1881&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=721&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=649&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3894&language=English">Supporting healthy and responsible screen use during COVID-19</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find helpful resources including handouts, videos and other resources about COVID-19.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqeyRuvF9WU">Your virtual video visit overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3889&language=English">Virtual care at SickKids</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3910&language=English">Virtual care: How to accurately measure your child’s height and weight at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUqAzahUMBvvRg2bbViWhH7"></iframe> </div><p>See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a></p> <br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19COVID-19 learning hub Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.Main

 

 

How to treat splinters and sliversHow to treat splinters and sliversHow to treat splinters and sliversHEnglishPain/AnaesthesiaToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinNAProcedures;Conditions and diseasesAdult (19+) Caregivers Community healthcare providersPain2021-05-14T04:00:00Z7.8000000000000069.3000000000000866.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>A splinter is a small fragment of material that has become embedded under the skin. Learn how to treat splinters and when you need to go to the emergency room.</p><h2>What is a splinter/sliver?</h2><p>A splinter, also known as a sliver, is a small fragment of material that has become embedded under the skin. Most splinters come from pieces of wood, but other common materials that cause splinters include glass, plastic and metal. The bones of animals, like fish, can also cause splinters.</p><p>Most children get splinters on their hands or feet, but a splinter can happen anywhere on the body.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A splinter/sliver is a small fragment of material that has become embedded under the skin.</li><li>It is important to remove a splinter right away to avoid an infection.</li><li>If a splinter is large, deep or impossible to remove, seek help from a health-care professional.</li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of a splinter/sliver</h2><ul><li>A small dark spot or line underneath the skin</li><li>Sharp, stinging pain where the splinter is located</li><li>A feeling that something is stuck under the skin</li><li>Symptoms of infection including redness, swelling, warmth or pus where the splinter is located</li></ul><h2>How to treat splinters/slivers</h2><p>To remove a splinter from under your child’s skin:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands and the area around the splinter with soap and warm water, and gently pat the skin dry.</li><li>Sterilize a needle and tweezers with rubbing alcohol and a cotton pad, or use a presterilized splinter remover (e.g., Splinter Out).</li><li>Using tweezers to remove the splinter:</li><ul><li>If the splinter end is sticking out of the skin, use the tweezers to slowly pull it out. It is important to pull at the same angle that the splinter entered the skin in order not to break it.</li></ul><li>Using a needle or splinter remover to remove the splinter:</li><ul><li>If the entire splinter is embedded under the skin, gently pierce the surface of the skin and use the needle to carefully push out part of the splinter. When there is enough of the splinter end sticking out, use the tweezers to slowly pull it out. It is important to pull at the same angle that the splinter entered the skin in order not to break it.</li></ul><li>After the splinter has been removed, clean the area with soap and water and cover it with a bandage until it heals.</li></ol><p>If the site of the splinter is throbbing or painful, your child can take over-the-counter pain relievers either before or after removal. If the splinter is large, deep or impossible to remove, seek help from a health-care professional.</p><h2>Helpful tips</h2><ul><li>Soak the location of the splinter in warm water for a few minutes before trying to take it out. This may help the splinter move closer to the skin’s surface.</li><li>Sometimes, placing an adhesive bandage over the area will help to soften the skin – try to remove the splinter a few hours later.</li><li>Use a magnifying glass to help you get a better look at the splinter.</li><li>Get help from another adult to help keep your child still or to hold up a magnifying glass.</li><li>Do not pinch your child’s skin. This can put pressure on the splinter and cause it to break into fragments.</li><li>Be patient and calm. If you are calm, your child is more likely to stay calm as well.</li><li>If the end of the splinter is sticking out of the skin, encourage your child not to touch it as it is easier to remove if the end is not broken off.</li></ul><h2>Infection</h2><p>It is important to remove a splinter right away to avoid an infection. It is also easier to remove a splinter as soon as you or your child become aware of it, as your child’s skin has not yet had time to heal over. Organic material like wood or thorns may become infected more quickly than inorganic material such as glass, plastic and metal; so, it is especially important to remove these splinters immediately.</p><h2>How to prevent splinters/slivers</h2><p>To prevent splinters, have your child avoid:</p><ul><li>rubbing their hands along wooden surfaces like playground equipment, railings, picnic tables and outdoor furniture</li><li>walking barefoot across decks, docks, boardwalks and when wading in water such as lakes, rivers and streams</li><li>walking in areas where glass has broken without wearing slippers or shoes</li><li>walking in areas that are overgrown with trees and bushes, and with plants that have thorns or spikes</li></ul><h2>When to seek medical attention</h2><p>Make an appointment with your child's doctor or take them to the nearest Emergency Department if:</p><ul><li>The splinter is large, deep or impossible to remove</li><li>The splinter has entered the skin near the eye or under the fingernail or toenail</li><li>The area of the splinter is bleeding a lot</li><li>The skin around the splinter looks infected (red, swollen, warm to the touch or pus is present)</li><li>The splinter has broken in the attempts to remove it</li><li>You have tried unsuccessfully to remove the splinter for more than 10 to 15 minutes</li><li>Your child's <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=759&language=English">tetanus</a> vaccine is not up to date</li></ul><p>Be sure to ask your child’s health-care provider if a tetanus booster is needed.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Splinters%20and%20slivers.jpg A splinter, or sliver, is a small fragment of material that has become embedded under the skin. Discover helpful tips to treat splinters.Main
Burn prevention: Campfires, fire pits and fireworksBurn prevention: Campfires, fire pits and fireworksBurn prevention: Campfires, fire pits and fireworksBEnglishPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-10-20T04:00:00Z5.3000000000000078.3000000000000467.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page gives advice on how to prevent your child from getting a burn from campfires, fire pits and fireworks.</p><p>Most burn injuries are preventable.</p><p>Campfires, fire pits and fireworks are common activities during summer. They can be fun, but they can also be unsafe. Every year, campfires, fire pits and fireworks cause very serious burns that can lead to permanent scars.</p><p>Here are tips on how to prevent burns when around campfires, fire pits or fireworks.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Do not let your child come close to a campfire, fire pit or fireworks.</li><li>Coals can stay hot for up to 48 hours after a fire and cause serious burns.</li><li>Do not bury hot coals.</li><li>Children should stay at least 2 to 3 metres away from the heat source.</li><li>Do not let your child play with sparklers or light fireworks on fire.</li></ul><h2>Campfires and fire pits</h2><p>Keep your child at a safe distance from campfires and fire pits. Draw a "safety circle" around the fire that they must not cross. This circle should be at least 2 to 3 metres from the edge of the fire.</p><p>Do not let your child play around the campfire or fire pit. Most burns happen when children fall or walk into the fire by accident.</p><h3>Campfires</h3><p>Do not bury campfires with sand. This makes it impossible for people to know where the hot coals are.</p><p>Put campfires out with water instead of sand. Pour water until all the hissing sounds stop. Covering a fire lets it retain its heat. Children can be burned from the hot ashes and coals of last night's fire. An adult should be able to put their hand directly over the ashes without feeling heat to know the fire is out.</p><h3>Fire pits</h3><p>If a fire pit has a screen, use it whenever you are burning. It is especially useful to use a metal screen over wood-burning fires to keep sparks from popping out.</p><p>When you are done using your fire pit for the evening, douse it or shut it off properly. Most manufactured fire pits have specific instructions for putting out a fire. It is important to read the instructions before using your fire pit.</p><h2>Fireworks</h2><p>Leave fireworks to the professionals. This is the safest way to enjoy fireworks and avoid burns. Sit back and watch instead.</p><p>Children under five years old should not be allowed to use sparklers. Preschool-aged children do not have the coordination to handle fireworks safely. Do not leave your child alone with sparklers, as they may burn themselves or their clothes may catch fire.</p><p>Only adults should light fireworks. Do not let your child set off fireworks. Children and any other viewers should be at least 20 metres (about 50 feet) away when fireworks are lit.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/AKH%20Social%20Media/Adult%20and%20child%20sitting%20by%20the%20fire.jpgBurn prevention: Campfires & fireworks Campfires and fireworks cause serious burns every year. Find advice on how to prevent your child from getting a burn.Main
How to set limits (children up to 5 years of age)How to set limits (children up to 5 years of age)How to set limits (children up to 5 years of age)HEnglishDevelopmentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)NANANAAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-06-19T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>It is important to set limits with your child, starting at a young age. Learn about why children need limits, the challenges of limit setting and how to appropriately use consequences and time outs.</p><h2>Why do children need limits? </h2><p>Children need set limits for a number of reasons, including:</p><ul><li>To help make sure they are safe (e.g., don’t run into the road).</li><li>To help with certain activities (e.g., learning to socialize appropriately with others). </li><li>To optimize growth and development (e.g., sleeping through the night, eating nutritious meals). </li><li>To encourage self-regulation, which helps children calm themselves when they become frustrated or angry. Self-regulation helps with both little transitions (e.g., time for a nap) and big transitions (e.g., starting school).</li></ul><p>What you teach your child about limits will help them for the rest of their life. </p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WGsiQ5pF47o"></iframe> <br></div> <p></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Children need set limits for many reasons including to help make sure they are safe, to optimize growth and development and to encourage self-regulation.</li><li>The use of consequences helps teach children responsibility for their actions.</li><li>Time outs should only be used as a last resort; if a parent or caregivers uses time outs, they should use them in a consistent and structured way.</li></ul><h2>Challenges with limit setting </h2><p>Limit setting can be a challenge for all parents and may be especially difficult when a child has been hospitalized or has been unwell.</p><p>How children and parents react to limits will depend on: </p><ul><li>individual temperament</li><li>past relationships</li><li>the child’s experiences </li></ul><p>You can’t control how your child will react or feel about a situation, but you can help them learn how to express frustration and anger in a safe way.</p><p>Be comfortable setting limits with your child. You are keeping your child safe and helping to support their development. </p><p>Limit setting is most effective when used the same way between care providers (e.g., parents, daycare workers, grandparents). As much as possible, care providers should try to set limits consistently so the child knows what is expected of them. </p><h2>Using consequences </h2><p>Consequences help teach our children responsibility for what they do, allowing a method of controlled discipline. When using consequences with your child, consider the following:</p><ul><li>Give your child a choice to follow your instruction before giving them the consequence</li><li>Try to stay calm when giving the consequence.</li><li>Make sure you follow through with the consequence (e.g., taking away a favourite toy for a week is hard to enforce, but a few hours is more realistic).</li><li>Once the consequence is over, give your child a chance to do something helpful/positive, and praise them for it. </li><li>Show your child love and trust after a consequence. Remember, the correction is aimed at the behaviour, not the child. </li></ul><h2>Time-out tips </h2><p>Time outs should be used as a last resort. If you use time-outs as a consequence for you child, be consistent with how you use them and how the time out is structured. Here are other tips for conducting a time out:</p><ul><li>Time outs can start at approximately 2-3 years of age. </li><li>Time out should last approximately one minute per year of age, to a maximum of five minutes.</li><li>Pick an appropriate place for your child to be during their time out (e.g., not near a television or with their toys).</li><li>Give a brief explanation of what behaviour led to the time out.</li><li>Ignore the child during the time out. </li></ul><p>When time out is over, consider it a fresh start. Don’t talk about the unwanted behaviour again.</p><div class="row"><div class="col-md-6"> <a href="https://www.sickkidsfoundation.com/podcast"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/foundation_banners/SKF%20Logo-%28Standard%29_New_Small_FINAL.jpg" alt="SickKids VS Podcast link" style="margin-top:1rem;" /> </a> <p></p></div><div class="col-md-6"><p>SickKids VS takes you to the frontlines in the fight for child health, where big questions drive big breakthroughs: Where do we start when a child’s disease is unknown? Can we heal the brain? How should we talk to kids about dying? Behind each quest, is a remarkable family and story. <a href="https://www.sickkidsfoundation.com/podcast">Listen now</a> and subscribe.</p><p><a href="https://www.sickkidsfoundation.com/podcast/parentstress_2">HOW DO WE HELP PARENTS HELP THEIR KIDS? SickKids VS Parent Stress (Part 2)</a></p></div></div> <h2>References and additional information</h2><p> <a href="https://www.cps.ca/en/documents/position/positive-parenting" target="_blank">How clinicians can support positive parenting in the early years (2019)</a></p><p> <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/positive-discipline-for-young-children" target="_blank">Positive discipline for young children (2020) </a></p><p> <a href="/article?contentid=714&language=english">AboutKidsHealth: Disciplining your child </a></p><p> <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/healthy-parenting" target="_blank">World Health Organization (2020) </a></p><p> <a href="https://www.imhpromotion.ca/">Infant Mental Health Promotion</a></p><p> <a href="http://www.impactparenting.com/storage/post-docs/PRIDE%20handout.pdf" target="_blank">Building Blocks of Behaviour</a></p><p> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/parents/essentials/communication/specialplaytime.html" target="_blank">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Special Play Time </a><br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/How_to_set_limits_(in_children_up_to_5_years_of_age).jpgHow to set limits for children Learn about why children need limits, the challenges of limit setting and how to appropriately use consequences and time outs.Main
Poison prevention: A guide to keeping your family safe from poisonsPoison prevention: A guide to keeping your family safe from poisonsPoison prevention: A guide to keeping your family safe from poisonsPEnglishPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-05-26T04:00:00Z6.6000000000000069.90000000000001827.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out how you can prevent poisonings at home, including how to store and give medicine safely, and learn about the everyday items around the house that may be harmful to children.</p><p>Many poisonings that occur in the home can be prevented. Poisonings are most likely to occur in young children less than six years of age, however, keep in mind they can happen at any age. Children are very curious and like to explore and play with medicines and household products. The majority of poisonings happen in your own home. </p><p>Remember: poisonings commonly occur when your <strong>normal daily routine</strong> is disrupted or during times of stress. Be alert and prevent poisonings!</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Your home contains many items that can poison a child.</li> <li>Very young children are especially vulnerable to being poisoned. This is because they explore their world with their mouths.</li> <li>All medicines can be dangerous to your child if the wrong amount or type is swallowed. Before you leave your doctor’s office or pharmacy, make sure you learn how to properly give or take the medicine.</li> <li>Do not store food, medicines and cleaning products in the same place. Store them in separate areas.</li> <li>Do not pour unused paint or other chemicals down the drain. Call your local Public Works Department to find out how to dispose of unused paint.</li> </ul><h2>What to do if someone is poisoned</h2><p>Be very careful not to taste, touch or breathe in the poison yourself. If your child is unconscious, shaking and convulsing, or having trouble breathing or swallowing, call 9-1-1 immediately.</p><h3>When and how to call 911</h3><p>Use this video to teach your child how to call 911 from any type of phone and ask for help, as well as when they should and should not call 911.</p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JdKG_L5YuB8?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div><h2>Why do poisonings happen?</h2><p>Many poisonings occur because harmful products have not been used or stored properly. Very young children are especially in danger of being poisoned. It only takes a few seconds for a child to swallow a dangerous amount of a poisonous product that is not stored safely. Safe and proper storage of household poisons is extremely important.</p><p>Remember:</p><ul><li>Do not take your medicine in front of your children. They may try to copy you.</li><li>Do not give medicine to one child in front of another child.</li><li>Do not call medicine “candy”. Do not make a game out of giving medicine to your child.</li><li>Bad tastes and strong smells will not stop a child from swallowing poisonous products. Medicines, bleach, household cleaners, gasoline, lamp oil and other common household poisons may smell or taste bad, but your child may still swallow it.</li><li>Many poisonings occur when a product is in use. Never leave a child alone with a product or medicine even if it is only "for a second". Take the bottle with you if you have to answer the telephone or a knock at the door.</li><li>Parents often keep bottles of medicine in diaper bags and purses. Curious children can easily access these bottles.</li><li>Harmful fumes can be created when cleaning products and other chemicals are inadvertently mixed together. Be careful not to mix chlorine bleach with other substances!</li></ul><h2>Storing medicine safely </h2><p>Make sure all medicine is locked up! A fishing tackle or tool box with a lock works well. Store all of your family's over-the-counter prescription and herbal remedies in the locked box. Get rid of old medicine by taking it back to your local pharmacy for disposal.</p><p>Each day, the <a href="https://www.ontariopoisoncentre.ca/">Ontario Poison Centre</a> is contacted about poisonings because of medicine overdoses. Many overdoses happen because the medicine was not stored safely. Many parents store their family’s medicines in a cupboard that is up high. This storage strategy does not work. Children will climb to very high places to reach hidden medicines. Medicines must be locked up to be safe.</p><p>Tips:</p><ul><li>Keep track of how many pills are in a bottle. You can do this by sticking a piece of masking tape on the side of the bottle. Write on the tape how many pills are in the bottle. Each time you take a pill from the bottle, subtract it from the total number of pills.</li><li>For medicines that need to be stored in the fridge, keep inside a plastic container at the back of the fridge.</li><li>Store medicines in original container. Do not mix different medicines, vitamins or other tablets in the same container.</li><li>Try not to keep medicines in a purse or a diaper bag, but if you do, store them out of a child’s reach.</li><li>Remove these items from your cupboard: expired medicine, old-looking or crumbling pills, unused portions of prescription medicine, and unlabeled medicine bottles. Take these items to the pharmacist: they will dispose of them safely.</li></ul><h2>How to give medicine safely </h2><p>When giving medicine to someone else, always be sure you are giving them:</p><ul><li>The right medicine: Many pill and medicine bottles look alike. It is easy to grab the wrong bottle if you are not paying attention.</li><li>The right amount: Read the label every time you give a dose of medicine to be sure you are giving the right amount.</li><li>The right person: Mistakes can happen when we least expect it. Busy parents have been known to give medicine to the wrong child!</li><li>The right time: Make sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist when and how often you should be giving the medicine.</li></ul><p>Tip: Medicine should be given by the same person each time so that double dosing does not happen.</p><h2>Lock up your poisons </h2><p>Keep harmful products locked up in a cupboard or container. There are a variety of safety latches that can be purchased to lock a cupboard or cabinet. Find them in the child safety section of local stores. You should choose one that works for your family and your child.</p> Store products in their original container <p>Always store harmful products in their original containers. Never put a substance in a cup, water bottle or any other drinking container. Products that have been moved into other drinking containers will be mistaken for drinks (for example sports drinks, soft drinks, juice etc.).</p><p>Remember that products that have been moved out of their original containers are missing:</p><ul><li>Ingredient information (name and concentration)</li><li>Volume (number of millilitres in a full container)</li><li>Warning symbols</li><li>First aid information</li><li>Other visual cues</li></ul><h2>Child-resistant containers </h2><p>Many household products and medicines have specially designed lids that parents think are "child-proof". There is no such thing as a child-proof container. These containers are child-resistant. Child-resistant containers are designed so children cannot open a container easily. Do not rely on the container to keep your child safe.</p><p>Keep in mind that these containers are effective in slowing the time it takes your child to open the container. Hopefully, this delay will give you enough time to stop your child from opening the package. Only buy products and chemicals in child-resistant containers. Also, buy the smallest amount needed for immediate use. Try to avoid large bulk-size containers.</p><h2>Prevention around the house</h2><h3>Plants </h3><ul><li>Learn the names of your plants and know which ones are poisonous.</li><li>Keep the tag that comes with new plants so you remember the names.</li><li>Move poisonous plants to places where kids can’t reach them.</li></ul><h3>Cleaning products </h3><ul><li>Do not mix cleaning products together, especially ones that contain bleach.</li><li>Do not leave products unattended. If you’re using a product and called away to the phone/doorbell, bring the product with you.</li></ul><h3>Storage </h3><ul><li>Store all cleaning products out of child’s reach, or install safety latches on your cupboard.</li><li>Store food, medicine and cleaning product in <strong>separate</strong> areas.</li><li>Double check areas of your home (ex/garage, attic, laundry room, basement) for old/loose products.</li></ul><h3>Pesticides </h3><ul><li>Follow instructions on label carefully.</li><li>Wear personal protective equipment.</li><li>Buy only as much of the product as you need.</li></ul><h3>Lead </h3><ul><li>Homes built before 1960 may contain lead-based paint. This can be a hazard if the paint is chipping or flaking, and within reach of someone who might chew on it.</li><li>Visit <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/home-garden-safety/reduce-your-exposure-lead.html">Health Canada</a> to learn how to reduce your exposure.</li></ul><h3>Alcohol and cigarettes </h3><ul><li>Don’t forget to empty ashtrays and pour unfinished alcohol drinks down the drain.</li></ul><h2>Look for these warning symbols</h2><p>These symbols or pictures are put on the labels of products that are dangerous. You will find them on the labels of many different products that you use in your home. The symbol shows a picture inside a frame. The picture tells you the type of danger.</p><p>Be sure to read the labels of all your household products. Learn what each of these symbols mean:</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hazard_symbol_poison_EN.jpg" alt="Poison symbol" /> </figure> <h3>Poison</h3><p>This symbol means the product could make you or your child very sick or even die if it is swallowed or licked. Some products with this symbol can cause you or your child harm if they are breathed in.</p></div></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hazard_symbol_flammable_EN.jpg" alt="Flammable symbol" /> </figure> <h3>Flammable</h3><p>This symbol means the product can catch fire easily. Keep this product away from heat, flames and sparks.</p></div></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hazard_symbol_corrosive_EN.jpg" alt="Corrosive symbol" /> </figure> <h3>Corrosive</h3><p>This symbol means the product can burn skin or the eyes. If it is swallowed, it will also burn the throat and stomach.</p></div></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hazard_symbol_explosive_EN.jpg" alt="Explosive symbol" /> </figure> <h3>Explosive</h3><p>This symbol means the product container will explode if it is heated or punctured. If this happens, metal or plastic can fly out of the container.<br></p></div></div></div>poisonsafetypoisonsafetyhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/poison_proof_your_home.jpgKeeping your family safe from poisons Learn about the everyday items around the house that may be harmful to children and how to store them safely to prevent poisonings.Main
Psoriatic arthritisPsoriatic arthritisPsoriatic arthritisPEnglishRheumatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Body;SkinSkeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)Joint or muscle pain;Painhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/arthritis_psoriatic_MED_ILL_EN.jpg2017-01-31T05:00:00Z8.8000000000000051.9000000000000295.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Psoriatic arthritis is one type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Learn about the symptoms and possible complications of this condition.</p><p>Psoriasis is a skin disease. It is a scaly, red rash, usually on the scalp, behind the ears, on the eyelids, elbows, knees, or buttocks, or inside the belly button. Some people with psoriasis may also have pits or ridges in their fingernails. Children or teenagers with psoriasis may also have arthritis. This is called psoriatic arthritis. Sometimes the psoriasis starts before the arthritis, but sometimes the arthritis begins before the psoriasis. A family history of psoriasis is an important clue to the correct diagnosis.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Psoriasis is a scaly, red rash, usually on the scalp, behind the ears, on the eyelids, elbows, knees, buttocks, or inside the belly button.</li> <li>Psoriatic arthritis affects 3% to 10% of children with JIA.</li> <li>It can be mild or it can be severe and last into adulthood.</li></ul><figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Psoriatic arthritis</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/arthritis_psoriatic_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of finger, hip and toe joints and illustrations of psoriatic rash, nail splitting and dactylitis" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Psoriatic arthritis affects both males and females equally. It is characterized by nail pitting, swollen fingers or toes, soreness in any joint, and red scaly rash.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Quick facts about psoriatic JIA</h2><p>Here are a few more things you should know about psoriatic JIA:</p><ul><li>It occurs in 3% to 10% of young people who have JIA.</li><li>It can occur at any age.</li><li>It affects both boys and girls equally.</li><li>It can affect a few or many joints.</li><li>It may involve the hips or back, similar to enthesitis-related arthritis.<br></li><li>When the tendons of the fingers or toes become swollen or inflamed, they may look like sausages. This is called dactylitis.</li><li>There is a moderate risk of eye disease, called uveitis.</li></ul><p>Some children and teenagers have relatively mild psoriatic arthritis. Others have a more severe disease that can last into adulthood.</p>August is Psoriasis Awareness Month Learn about psoriatic arthritis, a type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that affects 3% to 10% of young people who have JIA. Main

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