AboutKidsHealth is a health education website for children, youth and their caregivers.


 

 

COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><p>This hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you cope. There are resources on how to support your child's mental health and general wellbeing through physical activity, sleep, nutrition and learning. Also included are videos and audio meditations to help you cope with stressful thoughts and experiences that occur throughout your day.<br></p> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fBkA2ZTUnyI"></iframe> <p>View Dr. Ronni's chat with Dr. Cheddar above.</p></div> <br> <div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/9Ay4u7OYOhA">6 steps to prevent COVID-19 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cmho.org/blog/blog-news/6519918-talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Wellbeing</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Audio meditations for mindfulness and coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Listen to these meditations in a quiet, comfortable spot to practise mindfulness, learn about ways to cope with physical and emotional pain or discomfort and to help you with stress throughout your day.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3cevA6EjCbE">5 senses</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/O5F3-Xw2XPE">The mountain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/YnL-hjXo4EQ">Self-compassion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/fZdw6wm3A3E">Body scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jc64ap852FU">Circle of gratitude</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/LMu-r-KZ_l8">Tree meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/xcO8IIeV12M">Mindfulness of thought</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Coping with physical and emotional pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3IK7yWuEs3k">Visualize your pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/UbTyPgHf8z4">Soften, soothe, allow</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/NN7fz8lMTIM">Ice cube</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/e0JMtabUVvQ">Comfort your pain</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Finding calm/coping with stress</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RQJNdVtHxlY">Time for rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RpHvQkHYrZ0">Allowing rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">Breathing meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/CMcx9tJ70rA">Joy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Equal breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QSf0JS0O16Q">Key word guided meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Tsi2np8xtVY">Bell meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/263e093H5eM">Bell sounds</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Jqu3SOEKtvE">Progressive muscle relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/4ilNITE3-fE">Relaxation with imagery</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Listen to these meditations in a quiet, comfortable spot to practise mindfulness, learn about ways to cope with physical and emotional pain or discomfort and to help you with stress throughout your day.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Mindfulness</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3cevA6EjCbE">5 senses</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/O5F3-Xw2XPE">The mountain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/YnL-hjXo4EQ">Self-compassion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/fZdw6wm3A3E">Body scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jc64ap852FU">Circle of gratitude</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/LMu-r-KZ_l8">Tree meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/xcO8IIeV12M">Mindfulness of thought</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Coping with physical and emotional pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3IK7yWuEs3k">Visualize your pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/UbTyPgHf8z4">Soften, soothe, allow</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/NN7fz8lMTIM">Ice cube</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/e0JMtabUVvQ">Comfort your pain</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Finding calm/coping with stress</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RQJNdVtHxlY">Time for rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RpHvQkHYrZ0">Allowing rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">Breathing meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/CMcx9tJ70rA">Joy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Equal breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QSf0JS0O16Q">Key word guided meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Tsi2np8xtVY">Bell meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/263e093H5eM">Bell sounds</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Jqu3SOEKtvE">Progressive muscle relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/4ilNITE3-fE">Relaxation with imagery</a></li></ol></li></ol><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuU99GGMBBV2N_b2tsRwMx0m"></iframe><br> <p>Above is our COVID-focused playlist. See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19Main
COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditionsCOVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditionsCOVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditionsCEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversFever;Cough;Runny nose2020-03-18T04:00:00Z10.000000000000051.1000000000000798.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children who are immunocompromised and children with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk of complications from the novel coronavirus COVID-19.</p><p>Children who are immunocompromised and children with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk of complications from the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The following questions and answers may help you during this outbreak.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>SickKids is safe for you and your child to come to for assessment as directed by your primary care team.</li><li>Children who are immunocompromised and children with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk of developing complications if they do get COVID-19.</li><li>Washing your hands frequently using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, or by using soap and water for 20 seconds will help to prevent you from getting COVID-19.</li><li>Your child should continue to take their regular medications as prescribed by their primary care team unless specifically instructed otherwise.</li></ul> <h2>What is novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?</h2><p>A new or novel strain of coronavirus was identified in late 2019, and has now spread across the globe. The World Health Organization has named this novel coronavirus COVID-19 and has declared the outbreak a pandemic.</p><h2>Is my child immunocompromised?</h2><p>Immunocompromised children have weak immune systems. A weak immune system could be caused by many different medical conditions or medications. Some examples include children who have:</p><ul><li>had a solid organ transplant (i.e. heart, kidney, lung, liver, intestinal)</li><li>had a bone marrow transplant</li><li>cancer</li><li>congenital or primary immunodeficiency</li><li>HIV/AIDS</li><li>rheumatological disease</li><li>gastrointestinal disease</li><li>severe burns</li></ul><p>And those who are:</p><ul><li>taking selective immunomodulators (i.e. anti-TNF agents, azathioprine, MMF and all immunosuppressive agents).</li><li>taking long-term steroid therapy</li><li>in a severely malnourished state</li></ul><p>If you are unsure if your child is immunocompromised, please check with your primary care team at the hospital.</p><h2>Is my child at higher risk of getting COVID-19?</h2><p>There is still a lot being learned about COVID-19. At this time, serious illness in children appears to be less common than it is in adults. It is not yet clear whether children with underlying or chronic medical conditions are at greater risk of being infected with COVID-19, or of serious illness if they get the infection. Based on what is known about the influenza virus, it would not be unexpected for immunocompromised children, or children with an underlying chronic medical condition (i.e. chronic lung disease) to be at increased risk of complications from a COVID-19 infection.</p><h2>How do I know if my child has COVID-19?</h2><p>Your child may have COVID-19 if they have some or all of the following symptoms:</p><ul><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=774&language=English">cough</a> or sneezing</li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=748&language=English">sore throat</a></li><li>difficulty breathing or fast breathing</li><li>body aches</li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headache</a></li><li>chills</li><li>fatigue</li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a></li><li>runny or stuffy nose that progresses to one of the above symptoms</li></ul><p>While fever may be the main symptom in immunocompromised children, not all children with COVID-19 will have a fever. For children who have a runny or stuffy nose you should be most concerned about a possible COVID-19 infection if other symptoms develop. It is not yet known if immunocompromised children with a COVID-19 infection have different symptoms.</p><h2>Should I come to the hospital if I think my child has COVID-19?</h2><p>If your child has symptoms of COVID-19 contact your primary care team at the hospital before coming. They will help you determine if your child needs to be seen and where you should go.</p><p>You should come to the hospital right away if your child has the following symptoms:</p><ul><li>fast breathing or trouble breathing</li><li>bluish skin color</li><li>not drinking enough fluids</li><li>not waking up or not interacting</li><li>being so irritable that the child does not want to be held<br></li></ul><p>In an emergency please call an ambulance and tell the emergency services team that you are concerned your child may have a COVID-19 infection.</p><h2>Is testing for COVID-19 available at SickKids?</h2><p>Yes, testing is available at SickKids for children with weakened immune system that have concerning symptoms, such as fever and cough. Testing is usually done with a nose swab to try to identify various viruses. These swabs now test for COVID-19 as well.</p><h2>If my child is diagnosed with COVID-19, how long will they be sick?</h2><p>There is still a lot to be learned about COVID-19. Children with weakened immune systems may be sick for a longer period of time than other children. How long will vary from child to child.</p><h2>Should my child avoid public places such as shopping malls, public transit and playgrounds?</h2><p>At this time, it is recommended that social distancing including avoiding crowded environments is appropriate, in keeping with current public health recommendations. In crowded situations that cannot be avoided, extra precautions should be taken such as frequent handwashing. If you have alcohol-based hand sanitizer carry it with you to use when soap and water are not available. At this point, firm recommendations regarding summer camps cannot be made, however such camps will likely be cancelled if the outbreak continues unabated.</p><h2>What are effective measures to prevent COVID-19 spread?</h2><ul><li>Like other respiratory viruses, including influenza, it is recommended that you wash your hands frequently by using alcohol-based hand sanitizer, or by using soap and water for 20 seconds.</li><li>Limit touching your face, nose and eyes.<br></li><li>Avoid close contact with people who have a fever or cough.</li><li>Practice cough etiquette by keeping a distance from other people, coughing and sneezing into your sleeve or a tissue or a respiratory mask, and practicing frequent hand washing.</li></ul><h2>Are there any extra precautions that my child or I should be taking?</h2><p>Encourage your child to wash or sanitize their hands frequently. For example, if they are in school, you can provide older children with a bottle of alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Hand sanitizer can be dangerous if swallowed. Be careful to keep it away from young children. Avoid having your child be in close contact with anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19. Be vigilant for signs of infection in your child.</p><h2>Should my child wear a face mask when in public?</h2><ul><li>There is no current evidence that wearing a mask in public spaces will help your child to avoid infection from COVID-19. Other measures, such as careful hand washing and social distancing have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing transmission of the infection. However, you and your child may consider wearing a face covering (sucha as a cloth mask or bandana) in public spaces if physical distancing is not possible.</li><li>If your child has respiratory symptoms (i.e. fever, cough) and they are at the hospital for assessment, it is important that they wear a mask to avoid spreading infection to others. If you do not have a mask for this purpose you should ask for one when you arrive at the hospital.</li><li>Your primary care team may also advise your child to wear a mask for other reasons and you should follow this advice.</li></ul><h2>Should my child continue on their immunosuppressive medications?</h2><p>Your child should continue to take their regular medications as prescribed, unless directed differently by your primary care team at the hospital. Make sure you have enough medication and supplies on hand to last for 30 days, in case you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.</p><h2>Should we cancel our upcoming trip or vacation?</h2><p>Yes. At this time, it is recommended that any upcoming trips or vacations be cancelled until further notice.</p><h2>Can my child go to school?</h2><p>Please follow the guidance from the Ontario Ministry of Education and your child’s local school regarding mandatory school closure. If your child has any signs or symptoms of COVID-19 do not send them to school even if their school remains open.</p><h2>What should I do if I am unwell myself, or my child’s sibling becomes unwell with symptoms of COVID-19 infection?</h2><p>Contact your family doctor or paediatrician as it is recommended that unwell siblings or parents of children who are immunocompromised be tested for COVID-19. It is also advised that you practice social distancing at home as much as possible. You can also refer to Ontario general guidelines of who should be tested for COVID-19 and ways of accessing testing at <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus</a>.</p><h2>What should I do if a member of my household has recently returned from travel outside of Canada?</h2><p>People returning from travel outside of Canada should self-isolate for 14 days, in keeping with current public health recommendations. During that time period your child should avoid close contact with this person as much as possible.</p><h2>Should I or my teen who is immunocompromised go to work?</h2><p>Follow public heath guidelines and practice social distancing when appropriate. This may include avoiding work environments that involve contact with large groups of people. It is recommended that you or your teen who is immunocompromised try to work from home as much as possible.</p><h2>If my child requires assessment for symptoms other than COVID-19 infection what should we do?</h2><p>Continue to follow the recommendations for getting your child assessed according to your primary care team’s instructions, as you would do normally. For example, if your child is on medication that causes them to have a low white blood cell count and they develop a fever, you should still go to the hospital for assessment and let the primary care team know about your child’s symptoms as per normal procedure.</p><h2>Should I reschedule my upcoming routine appointment?</h2><p>Clinic appointments are being reviewed and many upcoming visits may be rescheduled or moved to virtual care by video or telephone, if possible. Medically necessary appointments will continue. Please contact your primary care team at the hospital for questions regarding your upcoming appointments.</p><h2>What if the province orders a lockdown and mandates people staying in their homes? Will we be able to get to the hospital?</h2><p>Even in those countries that have ordered lockdowns, people have still been able to travel for medically necessary reasons.</p><h2>Is it safe for my child to come to SickKids during the current outbreak?</h2><p>Yes, the hospital is safe for you and your child to go to for assessment as directed by your primary care team. At all times SickKids has clear procedures in place for protecting your child from getting an infection when visiting the hospital. During this time additional measures to protect you and your child have been put in place. Please follow SickKids instruction regarding the number of visitors permitted to accompany your child. Please see <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/coronavirus"> https://www.sickkids.ca/coronavirus</a> for further information.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19--Information_for_parents.jpgCOVID-19: Information for parentsMain
How to talk to your child about COVID-19How to talk to your child about COVID-19How to talk to your child about COVID-19HEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-31T04:00:00Z9.1000000000000058.90000000000001632.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parents and caregivers play an important role in making sure their children receive honest and accurate information during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p><h2>Introduction</h2><p>The COVID-19 pandemic is interrupting our daily lives and children are impacted by this. They are not in school and their daily routines have been disrupted. Many may hear or see things about the COVID-19 pandemic and be worried and have questions. Parents and caregivers have an important role to play in making sure their children receive honest and accurate information that is appropriate for their developmental level.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Share ‘need to know’ information with your child, using age appropriate language.</li><li>Answer questions directly and honestly and do not make false promises.</li><li>It is okay if you do not know all the answers; focus on the short-term plan for the whole family.</li><li>If children are distressed, let them know that it is OK and understandable to have these feelings.</li><li>Model healthy coping skills and attend to your own physical and mental health.</li><li>Consider seeking out additional resources and supports for children with special needs or who are having trouble coping.</li> </ul><h2>How do I talk to my child about COVID-19?</h2><p>It is important for adults to provide accurate information that is appropriate to their child’s developmental level. For younger children, simple statements of facts are often enough. For example, you might say:</p><p> <em>“Lots of people have been getting sick with sore throats and coughs. We know that germs can cause this, so for now, places like schools, parks and stores are closed. This will help to stop the germs from spreading. We also need to wash our hands a lot, to keep ourselves and others healthy.”</em></p><p>Older children and teens may ask additional questions about where or how the pandemic began, what the leaders of our community and country are doing about it, how the pandemic affects them and how long the pandemic will last. Parents and caregivers should provide accurate, balanced and non-blaming or stigmatizing information to their children. For example, you might say:</p><p> <em>“The world is facing this challenge together and many people are working hard to come up with ways to help. As a matter of fact, the reason we are staying home is because scientists have learned this is the best way to reduce the impact of the virus. By staying home, you help to protect those that are more vulnerable such as the elderly and people with weaker immune systems.”</em></p><p>Or you could say:</p><p> <em>“This is not the first time the world has faced a challenge like this, and people become resourceful and start working together during such times to get things done. Researchers are sharing their findings to speed up progress to find treatments. Doctors and scientists across the world are talking to each other about what treatments may work and what treatments do not work. It is important you are aware not everything posted online is true. Many sites use clickbait to get you to look at information that is exaggerated, misleading or untrue.”</em></p><p>It is okay to say you do not know all the answer to your child’s questions, or that you are feeling worried as well. When talking to your child, try to present a hopeful positive outlook and tone. Be mindful of news, radio, or social media information your children are exposed to and minimize their exposure if not appropriate to their level of understanding.</p><p>Also, emphasize that your family is taking the right steps to stay safe going forward. Remember your child is not only learning from what you are explaining with words, but also, perhaps more so, from how you behave. If your actions show you are nervous and stressed, then your child will “learn” that the situation is stressful and being nervous and stressed is the best way to deal with it. In contrast, if you remain calm and composed about the situation, your child will feel safer and learn that staying calm is the best way to deal with it. Children pick up on and mirror your cues. Your children will also notice if you are ‘hiding’ things from them or having whispered conversations with other adults; this will add to a child’s stress. If you are having difficulty managing your own anxiety, ask for help from family, friends, and if needed, your health-care provider.</p><h2>How do I answer my child’s questions about COVID-19?</h2><p>When answering your child’s questions, try to find out what your child already knows. Provide accurate and honest information that is appropriate for their developmental level. Do not make false promises about how long the pandemic will last, as things are changing every day. The Centers for Disease Control has provided some <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/talking-with-children.html">child friendly answers to common health related questions about COVID-19</a>.</p><h2>Encourage children to help with planning and focus on the short-term</h2><p>Parents and caregivers can acknowledge the uncertainty regarding the coming weeks and months. They can encourage the whole family to be flexible with their plans and focus on the short-term. It can be helpful for everyone to focus on their community and their family and find safe ways to help others during the pandemic. Both children and adults feel better if they can do something. It is important to realize that even simple actions can be of great importance; for example, calling someone regularly who you know is alone or has difficulty coping with the situation. Where possible you can consider involving your child in these actions. Some examples include reaching out to relatives, friends and neighbors using methods such as social media, email, phone calls or video chat; writing letters or cards; or coming up with activities that can be shared remotely with other families. Reaching out to local online community and school groups may be another good place to start.</p><p>Work with your child to develop a daily schedule. This could include academic and learning activities, leisure and creative activities, and physical activities. It can be helpful to schedule or limit non-academic screen time from the beginning, to avoid overuse and a future need to cut back. Refer to the family schedule throughout the day. For some children an entire day can be overwhelming, so break the schedule down into shorter periods of time (for example, a morning schedule and an afternoon schedule). Try to stick to a consistent routine for waking up, meals and snacks, and bedtime. Routines offer security and predictability to children.</p><h2>If your child is upset, validate their feelings</h2><p>It is common for children (and adults) to feel scared, upset, anxious or distressed during stressful times. For some children, this may take the form of tantrums and difficult behaviours such as aggression. Other children may have more trouble getting to sleep. Some children might show regression, temporarily losing a previously acquired skill, as a symptom of anxiety. Examples include if your child starts wetting the bed or asking for more help with daily tasks such as getting dressed.</p><p>Parents and caregivers should validate their children’s feelings by saying for example: <em>“I can see you are really scared right now” or “You really miss your school and friends, it is hard to be home all day.”</em> Avoid providing false reassurance or trying to fix their distress. Offer concrete reassurance by saying for example: <em>“I am here for you when you are ready, or if you need me”</em> and <em>“We will get through this together.”</em> For younger children, distraction and redirection can also be helpful. For example, you can suggest reading a book together. Remember that children are adaptable and resilient by nature.</p><h2>Model healthy coping skills and attend to your own physical and mental health</h2><p>It is vital that parents and caregivers take care of their own physical health and stress level during the pandemic. Look after yourself because your children depend on you. This includes eating nutritious food, getting adequate sleep, taking care of your grooming, and trying to include exercise in your day. Find a few quiet moments each day and listen to music, meditate or pray, do yoga and connect with loved ones.</p><p>Children take their cues from parents and caregivers. If you as a parent or caregiver are anxious or panicked, then your child will pick up on this and likely feel the same way. Social isolation and high levels of stress can be overwhelming for everyone; it is okay for parents to step away, take breaks, and seek help when needed.</p><p>Parents and children should avoid listening to and looking at too much news and media content as this can cause and increase anxiety. You should pick a reliable news source and check in no more than once or twice each day. Reach out to your family physician or other supports if you are having trouble coping. See the <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Centre for Addition and Mental Health</a> website for recommendations and supports for adults.</p><h2>Consider seeking out additional resources for your child</h2><p>For children with unique communication needs or developmental disabilities, consider seeking out additional resources to explain what is happening. For example, visit Autism Speaks Canada for a <a href="https://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/flu_teaching_story_final%20%281%29.pdf">flu teaching story</a> to share with your child.</p><p>For children and youth who are experiencing ongoing increased distress or anxiety, consider reaching out to your regular health-care providers. Most providers should be able to offer virtual or phone check-ups. Some helpful online apps to help parents (and children) cope are listed below.</p><ul><li><a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/">Anxiety Canada</a> website has helpful information and guides to develop an anxiety plan for people of all ages.</li><li>Mental health apps: <a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/resources/mindshift-cbt/">MindShift</a>, <a href="https://www.calm.com/">Calm</a>, <a href="https://www.headspace.com/headspace-meditation-app">Headspace</a>, <a href="https://www.stopbreathethink.com/">Stop, breathe and think</a> and <a href="https://www.stopbreathethink.com/kids/">Stop, breathe and think kids</a>. These offer general coping strategies and introductions to cognitive behavioural therapy. All of them have some free content or trials.</li><li>Mindfulness and meditation: <a href="https://www.smilingmind.com.au/">Smiling mind</a> (meditation for all ages), and <a href="https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/ucla-mindful-app">UCLA Mindful</a>.</li><li><a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/mentalhealth?topic=guidedmeditations">Guided meditations</a> from AboutKidsHealth, a health education resource for children, youth and caregivers that is approved by health-care providers at The Hospital for Sick Children.</li></ul><h2>References</h2><p>Autism Speaks Canada. Visual Supports and Autism Spectrum Disorder tool kit. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/visual-supports-and-autism-spectrum-disorder-1/">https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/visual-supports-and-autism-spectrum-disorder-1/</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 16). Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/">https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 30). Talking with children about Coronavirus Disease 2019. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/talking-with-children.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/talking-with-children.html</a></p><p>Centre for Addition and Mental Health. (2020). Mental Health and the COVID-19 Pandemic. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19</a></p><p>National Association for School Psychologist. (2020, February 29). Talking to Children About COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Retrieved from <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/NASN/3870c72d-fff9-4ed7-833f-215de278d256/UploadedImages/PDFs/02292020_NASP_NASN_COVID-19_parent_handout.pdf</a></p> https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/How_to_talk_to_your_child_about_COVID-19.jpgMain
Mental healthMental healthMental healthMEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANACaregivers Adult (19+)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn how to support your child’s well-being with activity, sleep and nutrition; and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions.</p><p>This hub includes resources for parents on how to support your child's mental health and general well-being through physical activity, sleep and nutrition. It also provides information on the signs, symptoms and treatments of different mental health conditions, including anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, behavioural disorders, anorexia nervosa and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.<br></p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuURSU5nmvDVZhSR8Ibr7NHK" frameborder="0"></iframe><br></div><p>Above is our mental health video playlist. To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The everyday pressures of growing up can put a strain on any child's mental well-being. Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them through difficult times.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and well-being</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Screen time</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=639&language=English">Nutrition: How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Anxiety disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Every child feels anxiety at some point as a natural part of growing up. An anxiety disorder, however, is when anxious feelings interfere with a child's everyday routine. Learn more about the signs, symptoms and range of anxiety disorders and how they ​are treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=271&language=English">Anxiety: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=270&language=English">Types of anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">Anxiety: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Resources for coping with anxiety</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">The CARD System - Coping with your child's anxiety (for parents/caregivers)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Obsessive compulsive disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) occurs when a person suffers from troubling and intrusive thoughts and/or follows repetitive or strict routines to feel less worried. Learn about the causes, signs and impact of this disorder and how you can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">Obsessive compulsive disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=288&language=English">OCD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=286&language=English">How OCD affects your child's life</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=709&language=English">OCD: Psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=287&language=English">OCD: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Depression</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Depression is an illness that causes someone to feel deep sadness or a lack of interest in activities that they once enjoyed. Discover how this condition affects a child's mood, sleep, concentration and energy levels, and how it can be treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=284&language=English">Depression: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=707&language=English">Depression: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=708&language=English">Depression: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Bipolar disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>When a person has bipolar disorder, they alternate between low and elevated moods for days, weeks or months at a time. Learn about the bipolar disorder spectrum, the symptoms of manic and depressive episodes and how medications, therapy and lifestyle changes can help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=279&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=280&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=704&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=705&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Suicide and self-harm</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A child who experiences thoughts of suicide or self-harm is often suffering from overwhelming emotional pain. Find out how to help your child cope with difficult emotions, how to support and protect your child and where to find professional help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=291&language=English">Suicide in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=289&language=English">Self-harm in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=290&language=English">Signs and symptoms of suicide risk</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=293&language=English">How to help your child with difficult emotions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=292&language=English">How to protect your child from harm</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Eating disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>An eating disorder not only risks your child's health but can also disrupt family life. Find out about the symptoms and treatment of anorexia, bulimia, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and binge eating disorder and how you can help your child recover.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Anorexia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=268&language=English">Anorexia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=269&language=English">Anorexia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=267&language=English">Anorexia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=700&language=English">Anorexia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=266&language=English">Anorexia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Bulimia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=282&language=English">Bulimia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=283&language=English">Bulimia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=281&language=English">Bulimia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=706&language=English">Bulimia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=294&language=English">Bulimia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=274&language=English">Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=275&language=English">ARFID: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=273&language=English">ARFID: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=703&language=English">ARFID: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=272&language=English">ARFID: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Binge eating disorder (BED)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=277&language=English">Binge eating disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=278&language=English">BED: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=640&language=English">Obesity: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=276&language=English">BED: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves difficulties with controlling attention and regulating behaviour. Discover the main symptoms of ADHD in children and teens, how the disorder is diagnosed and how to help your child at home and at school.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1922&language=English">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1923&language=English">ADHD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1997&language=English">ADHD: How to help your child at home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1999&language=English">ADHD: Communicating with your child's school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1998&language=English">ADHD: Treatment with medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Behavioural disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Behavioural disorders include oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder. Learn how these disorders differ from typical misbehaviour, how therapy and medications can help and how you can manage problematic behaviour at home.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1924&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2001&language=English">Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is triggered by experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event. Learn about the main symptoms of PTSD, how the condition is diagnosed and how psychotherapy and medications can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1927&language=English">Post-traumatic stress disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1928&language=English">PTSD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2005&language=English">PTSD: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Brain disorders and mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A brain disorder includes a condition, illness or injury that affects the brain and how it develops before or after birth. Find out how a brain disorder can affect your child's learning, mood and social skills, how its impact on mental health is assessed and how to help your child cope.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1926&language=English">Brain disorders and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2002&language=English">Brain disorders: Assessing your child for neuropsychological difficulties</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2003&language=English">Brain disorders: How to help your child cope</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2004&language=English">Brain disorders: Common treatments</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Parenting a child with a chronic condition</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A chronic conditions can affect a child's mental health and everyday routines. Discover how parents and caregivers can help manage both their child's health care and routines, and support their own mental health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3400&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3401&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Helping your child manage their health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3402&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Maintaining your child's everyday routines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3403&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Supporting yourself as a caregiver</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Substance use disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Substance use is the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs for pleasure or enjoyment. Learn about the signs and symptoms of substance use and how you can help your teen if you suspect they have a substance use disorder.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3663&language=English">Substance use disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3664&language=English">Substance use disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=English">Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Understanding functional symptoms and somatization</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Somatization involves expressing distress through physical symptoms. Find out about the mind-body connection, signs of somatization and the various ways to support your child or teen.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3666&language=English">Functional symptoms: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3667&language=English">Mind-body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3668&language=English">Somatization: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3669&language=English">Somatization: Common treatments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3770&language=English">Somatization: How to help your child or teen cope</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Mental_health_landing-page.jpgmentalhealthhealthylivingMain
Poison ivyPoison ivyPoison ivyPEnglishDermatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Rash2014-05-21T04:00:00Z6.1000000000000075.8000000000000801.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to recognize a poison ivy plant, prevent rashes and how to treat the rash if your child is exposed.</p><p>Poison ivy is a plant that grows at sea level in moist shady regions east of the Mississippi River. It can cause a rash when it makes contact with the skin (contact dermatitis). The rash occurs when the skin reacts to substances in the oily sap (called urushiol) in the plant's roots, stems and leaves.<br></p><h2>What does the poison ivy plant look like?<br></h2><p>Poison ivy usually grows up large tree trunks as a shrub or as a vine.</p><ul><li>Each leaf has three leaflets that can be either shiny, smooth and hairless, or rough, hairy and velvety.</li><li>The leaves are reddish in the spring, green in the summer and yellow, orange or red in the fall.</li><li>The plant may have yellow-green flowers, or green or off-white berries.</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Poison ivy</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Poison_ivy_seasons_EQUIP_ILL_EN.png" alt="Poison ivy with green leaves in summer, green and red leaves in spring, and a mix of green, yellow and red leaves in fall" /></figure><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Poison ivy is a plant that can cause a rash when it makes contact with the skin.<br></li><li>Each leaf has three leaflets that can be shiny, smooth and hairless, or rough, hairy and velvety.</li><li>The rash is caused by oily sap in the plant's roots, stems and leaves.<br></li><li>To prevent poison ivy rash, stay away from the plant and wear protective clothing. A helpful rule for avoiding poison ivy is "leaves of three, leave them be".</li><li>Wash exposed skin and clothing thoroughly. This may help to prevent a reaction.</li><li>The rash should go away after a few weeks. Mild rashes can be treated with antihistamines. Very severe rashes might require steroids.</li><li>See your doctor if your child develops a <a href="/article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> or if the area around the rash becomes redder or swollen or has a milky discharge.</li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of a poison ivy rash</h2><p>The symptoms of a poison ivy rash may include:</p><ul><li>redness</li><li>extreme itching</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">hives</a></li><li>swelling</li><li>small or large blisters, often forming a line or streak</li><li>crusting skin</li></ul><p>The typical rash can last from one to three weeks.<br></p><p>The rash usually occurs on skin surfaces that are exposed directly to poison ivy. People can also be exposed to poison ivy's oily sap through indirect contact, including:</p><ul><li>scratching or rubbing, which moves the sap to other skin areas</li><li>contact with clothing, a pet, tools, sports equipment or other things that may have come into contact with the plant.</li></ul><p>If poison ivy is burned, the sap can cling to smoke particles and become airborne. This can cause reactions involving the skin, the eyes or the <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=lung-child">lungs</a>.</p><h2>How to treat a poison ivy rash</h2><h3>Mild rash</h3><ul><li>Place cool cloths on your child's skin.</li><li>Have your child take cool showers or lukewarm baths.</li><li>Give your child an antihistamine.</li></ul><p>Try not to let your child scratch. This can cause infection and scarring and may spread the sap to other parts of the body. If the rash is very severe, your child may need to take steroid medication by mouth.</p><p>Reactions may vary from person to person. Some people may not react to poison ivy at all, while others may have a very severe reaction.</p><h3>Signs of a serious reaction to poison ivy<br></h3><p>Your child has a serious reaction if:</p><ul><li>nothing helps to ease the itch</li><li>the skin around the rash seems to be infected</li><li>they develop a <a href="/article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li>the rash appears on their eyelids, lips, face or genitals</li><li>their face swells</li></ul><h2>How to prevent a poison ivy rash</h2> <p>The best way to prevent a rash is to avoid contact with the plant by learning to recognize it. A helpful rule for avoiding poison ivy is "leaves of three, leave them be".</p> <h3>What to do if your child cannot avoid an area where poison ivy may be present</h3> <ul> <li>Apply a product to their skin that helps prevent the skin from absorbing the plant's sap. These products are available over the counter and usually contain bentoquatam.</li> <li>Have your child wear clothing such as pants, long sleeves, boots and gloves when they are around poison ivy. Depending on your child's age, help them or remind them to remove exposed clothing carefully.</li> </ul> <p>Poison ivy sap can remain active for a long time. For this reason, use hot, soapy water to wash your child's clothing, shoes and anything else that may have made contact with the plant.</p> <p>If your child touches poison ivy, it is possible to prevent a rash by:</p> <ul> <li>washing their skin well with warm water and soap</li> <li>washing everything that may have sap on it.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p>See a doctor if your child:</p><ul><li>develops a <a href="/Article?contentid=801&language=English">skin infection</a> (increasing redness, swelling, pain or a milky discharge from the irritated areas)</li><li>is not responding to any of the treatments for a mild rash.</li></ul><p>Take your child to your nearest hospital emergency department right away if they are having trouble breathing or swallowing.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/poison_ivy.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />poisonivypoisonivyhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/poison_ivy.jpg Learn how to recognize a poison ivy plant, prevent rashes and how to treat the rash if your child is exposed. Main
Summer tipsSummer tipsSummer tipsSEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2018-01-19T05:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Check out tips to keep your family safe while playing in the sun or water, travelling, preparing a summer feast or exploring nature.<br></p><p>Summer is a time to take a break from routine and make the most of the sunshine. Check out tips to keep summertime safe and stress-free for you and your family, whether playing in the sun or water, travelling, preparing a summer feast or exploring nature.</p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuWtzEbfBDMIOavmvCd3lSFm" frameborder="0"></iframe><br></div><p>Above is a safety video playlist. To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Sun</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Keep your child safe in the summer sun with these tips to protect their skin, keep them hydrated and shield them from heat stroke.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=308&language=English">Protecting your child's skin</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=768&language=English">Sunburn</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1966&language=English">Heat-related illness: How to prevent</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1915&language=English">Heat-related illness in young athletes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1114&language=English">Eczema: Seasonal changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Water</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Whether your child is a strong swimmer or doggy paddler, check out these tips for a safe, cooling dip in the water during the heat.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1968&language=English">Water safety and drowning prevention</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1919&language=English">Recreational water illnesses: Prevention and precaution</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=747&language=English">Swimmer's ear (otitis externa)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1044&language=English">CPR in a baby (0 to 12 months): First aid</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1041&language=English">CPR in a child (from age 1 to puberty): First aid</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Outdoors</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Help your child stay active and free of injury while they play outside and go exploring during long, hot summer days.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1983&language=English">Helmets: How to get your child to wear one</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1982&language=English">Helmets: How they prevent injury</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1957&language=English">Playground safety</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Nature</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Help your child enjoy all that nature has to offer with these tips on plant safety, insect bites and staying safe near campfires and fireworks.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1956&language=English">Plant safety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=769&language=English">Poison ivy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=800&language=English">Insect bites</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1959&language=English">Burn prevention: Campfires and fireworks</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Nutrition</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Use these tips to minimize the risk of allergic reactions and prepare safe and enjoyable summer time meals with family and friends.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1961&language=English">Safe outdoor meals</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1944&language=English">Food allergies and travelling</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1914&language=English">Food poisoning: Protecting your family</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1455&language=English">Food safety</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Travel</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>No matter where your family goes this summer, use these tips to create a healthy and happy holiday and resolve any health issues.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=903&language=English">Fever in a returning traveller</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2518&language=English">Diabetes and vacations</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2117&language=English">Epilepsy and travel</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/summer_safety_landing_page.jpgsummersafetysummersafety,healthylivingSummer safety tips Check out tips to keep your family safe while playing in the sun or water, preparing a summer feast or exploring nature.Main
Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisisSupporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisisSupporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisisSEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-04-14T04:00:00Z9.8000000000000057.60000000000003300.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about strategies and ways to help your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder cope during the COVID-19 crisis.</p><h2>Introduction</h2><p>Children with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder, can be vulnerable to changes in routines. Unlike school holidays that are known about and can be planned for in advance, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unexpected closures to schools, programs and services. The situation is changing rapidly, and extra planning and support may be needed to help your child to cope with these changes.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Communicate at your child’s developmental level and use age-appropriate language.</li><li>Be a positive role model for your child and help them to cope and stay calm.</li><li>Set your child up for success by setting up a reward system, planning daily physical activity and promoting good sleep.</li><li>Watch for changes in your child’s behaviour. These could be signs that your child is becoming more stressed or anxious.</li><li>Use strategies to help manage challenging behaviours at home.</li><li>Know when to seek help if you need it. It is common and normal to feel anxious and stressed during times of crisis.</li></ul> <h2>Communicate at your child’s developmental level</h2><p>Use language that is appropriate for your child’s level of understanding to explain what is happening. Share concrete, visual information in the form of:</p><ul><li>Stories: This <a href="https://childdevcenter.org/news/social-stories-for-kids-about-covid-19/">website</a> has links to several social stories for children about COVID-19</li><li>Cartoons: This <a href="https://www.ppmd.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/The-Corona-Virus-Free-Printable-Updated-2-The-Autism-Educator-.pdf">cartoon</a> helps children understand about the virus and why their routines have changed</li><li>Videos: This <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DlOGKpMNs4">PLAYMOBIL</a> animation can be used to help explain COVID-19</li><li>Websites: Many websites have additional examples of <a href="https://www.kerrysplace.org/covid-19-resources/">communication resources</a></li></ul><p>For children who are non-vocal communicators (who cannot speak), make sure they have access to their communication system (such as pictures and visual boards, type-to-talk devices, tablet or smart phone AAC apps) to ask questions and express their feelings.</p><p>Answer your child’s questions simply and honestly, providing essential, ‘need to know’ information. Let them know you want to make sure everyone is safe and healthy. Try to focus on what will happen today and tomorrow, rather than talking about what will happen in the more distant future.</p><p>Acknowledge your child’s feelings, even if they do not express them out loud. Tell them you understand it must be very hard for them right now because they cannot see their friends and teachers, go to the places they like to visit or do many of the things they like to do. Let them know you are going to help them during this time and make positive statements such as “We will get through this together.” Some children may not want to talk about the current situation; they may express their feelings through play or art. Extra time for creative endeavours can help children process their feelings in their own way.</p><p>For tips on how to talk to your child about COVID-19, read this <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">article</a> or view this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=25&v=WhVad8ToCiU&feature=emb_logo">short video</a>.</p><h2>Help your child to cope and stay calm</h2><p>Children take their cues from their parents and caregivers. If parents and caregivers are anxious or panicked, children will pick up on this and likely feel the same way. Try to be a positive role model for your child by remaining calm and optimistic without giving false hope and making promises you cannot keep. It is OK to tell children that this is hard for you too and that we all need extra help sometimes. If you are having trouble managing, ask for help from family, friends, and if needed, your health-care provider.</p><h3>Routine and predictability</h3><p>Routine and predictability are important for children with neurodevelopmental disorder to feel in control and to make sense of the world around them. Develop a schedule to follow (for links to examples, see the Resource section) and refer to it throughout the day. Some children may prefer you decide what activities are on the schedule. Other children may prefer to have a list of activities they can choose from (use photos of activities for children who don’t read). Some families find that pairing a list of acceptable and desired activities with specific rewards or tokens for completion can give children a sense of control and allow them buy-in while minimizing struggles with parent-enforced transitions. Finding an option that works best for you and your child is key.</p><h3>Identify calming activities</h3><p>Make a list of activities that are calming for your child, such as taking a bath or watching a favourite video, and add these to your schedule. For children with autism spectrum disorder, recognize that repetitive activities (e.g., lining up toys, repeating dialogue from a movie) and stereotypic motor movements (e.g., turning in circles) may help them calm down when they are upset. It may also be necessary to build more calming activities into your child’s schedule and give up some academic or other more challenging tasks.</p><h3>Reduce sensory input</h3><p>Many children with neurodevelopmental disorder experience sensory overload and can become overwhelmed when the environment is too noisy, too crowded, too bright or there are too many things to look at. If possible, it may be helpful to create a new calming spot for your child that is quieter, dimly lit and has fewer visual distractions (especially if they are now confined to a busy home). This calming spot could be in a room that is not used very often or is away from the noise and activity. If space is limited, try to section off part of a larger room to create a smaller space. For younger children, you can cover a table with a sheet to make a private sitting area or pull a couch away from the wall. Consider offering your child earphones, noise cancelling headphones or eye shades.</p><h2>Set your child (and your routines) up for success</h2><p>Identify the best times and most challenging times in the day for your child and plan activities and demands accordingly. If your child is usually better able to handle demands in the mornings, structure learning activities or less preferred tasks during those times. During times when they are feeling tired or bored, different sensory activities can be offered such as deep pressure squeezes, water play, rice bins and light-up toys. Finger painting on windows with children’s paint is also a good activity to try as it can be washed away easily and repeated. There are many suggestions for activities circulating <a href="https://busytoddler.com/">online</a>. If your child needs some time alone, it is a good idea to have a ‘sensory bin’ available for them with items like stress or Koosh balls, slinky toys, spin tops, playdough or modelling clay, and glow sticks.</p><h3>Set up a reward system for your child</h3><p>In addition to following a daily schedule, consider reinforcing (rewarding) your child for completing activities and behaving in appropriate ways with a token system. Tokens can be checkmarks, coins, buttons or other items. Once your child has earned all their tokens, they can exchange them for a preferred item such as a snack, toy or screen time. Let them know how much time they have for their preferred activity and then reset the token system. Choose the appropriate number of tokens based on your child’s abilities. Some children work for four or five tokens before getting their reward whereas others can wait longer and work for 10 or 20 tokens. Some children may not be able to grasp a token exchange system and will need an immediate reward to reinforce a desired behaviour. When a token is given, it should not be taken away regardless of what behaviour follows. Your child is earning tokens as a reward for good behaviour. If they engage in problematic behaviours at other times, do what you can to calm them down and then return to the daily schedule and you can give them a token at that point.</p><h3>Plan daily physical activity</h3><p>Some children need frequent movement breaks throughout the day. This can be challenging to do indoors, but there are some activities that can be done safely and use up some of that energy. Activities such as jumping jacks, bouncing on yoga balls or a mini trampoline, and even timed races from one side of a room to another are possible, and an adult should be present to supervise. You can move furniture to the centre of the room so that your child can run around it. You can play ‘the floor is lava’ throughout the home by putting down sheets of paper as the ‘rocks’ you are allowed to step on. There are also many children’s workout and yoga videos available online including some with popular characters. If you are not strictly isolating at home, then plan regular hikes or playing in a field or backyard. Avoid public play structures or parks as it may be hard for your child or youth to be told they cannot use the equipment.</p><h3>Promote good sleep</h3><p>It is important to promote good sleep during these stressful times. Disrupted sleep can be a sign that your child is having difficulty coping. It can also contribute to behaviour changes in your child.</p><p>Strategies to promote good sleep hygiene include:</p><ul><li>Maintaining a regular bedtime routine. Try to keep bedtime and wake up times consistent.</li><li>Creating an environment in your child’s bedroom that encourages sleep. A cooler temperature, dark or dim light, and quiet are ideal. Some children like white noise. If possible, avoid the use of screens (i.e., phone, computer, tablets) in the bedroom, and minimize access to stimulating and preferred toys in the bedroom at night.</li><li>Avoiding certain foods too close to bedtime as they can interfere with sleep. For example, eating large meals, sugar and chocolate too close to bedtime can keep children awake at night.<br></li><li>Limiting screen time if possible for about an hour before bedtime.</li><li>Encouraging relaxation before bed:</li><ul><li>Encourage quiet activities such as reading (together or independently) or listening to soothing music.</li><li>Practise relaxation techniques such as <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Stess%20Busters%20Deep%20Breathing%20Resource%20combined.pdf">deep breathing</a>, guided meditation or progressive muscle relaxation. Some children also enjoy receiving a massage.</li><li>Defer ‘worry time’ until the next day. If your child is anxious and asking a lot of questions, reassure them, and try to direct them to talk about it during a set time the next day, but not before bed.</li></ul></ul><h2>Watch for changes in your child’s behaviour</h2><p>Be on the lookout for signs your child is becoming more stressed or anxious. This may be new behaviour you have not seen before or existing behaviour that becomes more intense or lasts longer than usual. Examples of behaviours can include pacing, yelling, crying, hitting or throwing objects. Other children may appear more shut down or withdrawn. If possible, try to talk to your child about what may be upsetting them and identify what to do next. This could include providing validation and reassurance, offering to help them with a task they find frustrating, directing them to a quiet space to calm down, checking the schedule to see what is coming up next or offering different activities to choose from (this strategy is known as distraction and redirection). Children who are hungry, fatigued or feel unwell may also show changes in their behaviour, so it is important to identify and address possible sources of pain or discomfort. Be flexible with the daily schedule if it seems to be making behaviours worse.</p><h2>Use strategies to manage challenging behaviours at home</h2><h3>Ensure a safe environment</h3><p>Sometimes when children become very upset or distressed, they are unable to control their emotions, and this can result in tantrums or “meltdowns”. During a meltdown, a child may, for example, scream, use angry language, hit others or themselves and throw things around. First and foremost, parents and caregivers need to stay calm. If possible, direct your child to a safe space where the tantrum can run its course while keeping everyone (and the environment) safe. If this is not possible, then try to make the space around your child safe by removing furniture that can be toppled over or objects that could be damaged or thrown. You may need to put down cushions, mats or blankets to protect your child from injury due to falling to the floor. Stand close by to supervise but not so close that you may get hit and be aware of exits to ensure your child does not run away. It can be helpful to have a room (or part of a room) in the home where the environment has been made safe in advance; this could include removing breakable or very heavy objects, securing tall furniture and having available preferred and soothing objects.</p><h3>Let the meltdown run its course</h3><p>For many children, tantrum or meltdown behaviours are signs of over-arousal and loss of control. Efforts to negotiate, reason with, punish or “bribe” children during a meltdown often make things worse. Try not to reward tantrum behaviours such as by giving in to previous requests or defaulting to screen time, as it can make tantrums occur more often. Stand nearby quietly, or gently hold or hug your child if that is safer. Occasionally make gentle soothing statements, for example, “I’m here for you when you need me,” or offer a distraction or solution by saying for example, “When you are feeling ready, we can read a book or have a snack.” Avoid complex sentences or detailed explanations or instructions. Most children cannot think rationally during these times and will be unable to respond to even simple demands or suggestions.</p><h3>Identify common triggers and make a plan</h3><p>Certain times of the day, particular activities starting or ending, or specific stressors may regularly trigger challenging behaviours for your child. During a calm time, it can be helpful to develop a family strategy to address this (with or without your child’s involvement) in advance. Some children benefit from using behavioural strategies to reinforce desired behaviours (while often ignoring or redirecting undesired behaviours). Some children may need extra direct teaching and practice to learn self-regulation skills.</p><h2>A behavioural strategy is a plan to improve a specific behaviour that is challenging</h2><p> <strong>Step 1. Pick one behaviour.</strong> Select one specific target behaviour to start with (e.g., reduce meltdowns and aggression when the tablet is turned off). It may be tempting to address several behaviours, but it is key to start with one specific behaviour.</p><p> <strong>Step 2. Make your child part of the team.</strong> During a calm period, discuss with your child that you want to help them improve the specific behaviour that you identified in Step 1. For example, you could say “I notice when it is time to turn off your game, things get really difficult for everyone. We are going to try a new plan today when that happens.” As much as possible, try to see your child as a member of the same team; you are working together to improve the target behaviour. If the behaviour occurs in specific situations, do your best to ensure those trigger moments are predictable for your child. For this example, you could say, “From now on, all screens have to be turned off at 12:00 p.m. as everyone has to come for lunch.”</p><p> <strong>Step 3: Small steps.</strong> Break the desired outcome into small steps and start with a reasonable and attainable goal that your child sometimes meets already. For example, a first step could include having your child go to their room for a break for a few minutes to calm down before lunch, using a coping skill such as deep breaths or jumping jacks or keeping their hands gentle and arms down. Maybe your child can help decide what are reasonable steps towards the end goal. This way, they will feel part of the team.</p><p> <strong>Step 4: Good behaviour deserves a reward.</strong> This is a step where your child may be eager to help decide what are reasonable rewards that can be gained for each step. You can consider using a token system so that your child can earn and collect tokens that can later be exchanged for a reward.</p><p> <strong>Step 5. Give time for transitions.</strong> Help your child prepare by giving friendly warnings. For example, with the example above, you should provide a warning at 11:55 a.m., and remind your child once of the new plan.</p><p> <strong>Step 6. Execute your plan, together.</strong> When the plan is in action, wait for things to settle. With the example above, your child may became upset but is able to go to their room and calm down. Congratulate your child for having accomplished, or having attempted to accomplish, the first step towards better dealing with frustration and provide them with a token.</p><h3>A few ground rules</h3><p> <em>Do not take away tokens</em> or provide rewards for non-compliance. A good and honest attempt should be rewarded, even if the entire goal was not met.</p><p> <em>Be flexible</em>: If your child is not meeting the goal, make the first step smaller and more attainable.</p><p>It is best to reward active behaviours (e.g., keeping their hands gentle) as opposed to rewarding them for not doing something (e.g., not hitting).</p><p> <em>Follow through with consequences.</em> If some behaviours do merit a clear consequence, this should be separate from their rewards. Autism Speaks Canada has a <em> <a href="https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/challenging-behaviors-tool-kit1/">Challenging Behaviour Toolkit</a></em> that can be requested.</p><h2>Know when to seek help</h2><p>These are especially challenging times, perhaps more so for parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorder. Some or all of the carefully organized supports and routines are discontinued due to the COVID-19 pandemic.</p><p>It is common and normal to feel anxious, afraid or irritable under these extreme circumstances. Most importantly, as parents and caregivers, we all need to do our best to be supportive, caring and loving to our children during times of stress.</p><p>Pay attention to your own mental health and seek <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">help and care</a> if you need it. Social isolation and high levels of stress can be overwhelming for everyone. It is OK for parents to step away, take breaks and seek help when needed. It may also be helpful to monitor your own screen time and news consumption and try to limit this if you feel it increases your level of stress.<br></p><p>At present, the health-care system is under pressure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of the regular services your child uses may be temporarily unavailable, and access to some crisis services may be restricted. At the same time, new services are being created to provide online support and advice. Service availability and accessibility may continue to change for as long as the pandemic is present. Therefore, it is advised that you reach out to your regular care team (therapist, pediatrician, family doctor, autism or developmental centre), explain the problem you are facing with your child and ask for support. Your regular health-care provider will have the latest information regarding services. Some children may require a new medication or a change in medication to help them get through this time safely at home.</p><h2>What do if there is a crisis</h2><ul><li>It can be helpful to have a ‘crisis plan’ prepared in advance. This can involve identifying coping strategies for parents and children, as well as identifying key supports and individuals, and how to contact them. Letting professional and family support people know in advance that you may be calling on them in a time of crisis can help everyone be prepared.</li><li>If the situation allows, call your regular care team (therapist, pediatrician, family doctor) as they should have the latest information regarding emergency mental health care services.</li><li>Call 911, highlight the mental health or behavioural concern and ask if a mobile crisis team is available to respond instead of the traditional approach. This will not always be possible.</li><li>If you feel that presentation to the emergency department is required, please call them first. Because of COVID-19, there may be restrictions or specific regulations in place that can help protect you and your child against possible contamination (or protect health-care workers and other patients).</li></ul><h2>Additional Resources</h2><p> <strong>Online toolkit for supporting individuals with ASD during the crisis</strong><br><a href="https://ed.unc.edu/2020/03/19/unc-team-creates-online-toolkit-for-those-supporting-individuals-with-autism-during-covid-19-epidemic/">https://ed.unc.edu/2020/03/19/unc-team-creates-online-toolkit-for-those-supporting-individuals-with-autism-during-covid-19-epidemic/</a></p><p> <strong>Tips for daily schedules in ADHD</strong><br><a href="https://www.additudemag.com/daily-schedule-coronavirus-home-school/">https://www.additudemag.com/daily-schedule-coronavirus-home-school/</a></p><p> <strong>Excellent videos and cartoons to help explain the situation to kids</strong><br><a href="https://mailchi.mp/779134e78b2d/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates?fbclid=IwAR1v1GF4SX_h54UAeYreS63c8XFP_2L9pulsjcMXkvrl3sdlz5DmobbTOhc">https://mailchi.mp/779134e78b2d/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates?fbclid=IwAR1v1GF4SX_h54UAeYreS63c8XFP_2L9pulsjcMXkvrl3sdlz5DmobbTOhc</a></p><p> <strong>E-Learning for Children with Down Syndrome (American resources)</strong><br><a href="https://mailchi.mp/e5af25bdf396/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates-1348871?fbclid=IwAR0IHLwpc01hSxtKxCNedyEP5pf8Yv1o5WpySTaNgRFuCsaYLHtW7Z2vU4g">https://mailchi.mp/e5af25bdf396/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates-1348871?fbclid=IwAR0IHLwpc01hSxtKxCNedyEP5pf8Yv1o5WpySTaNgRFuCsaYLHtW7Z2vU4g</a></p><p> <strong>How to talk to your kids about Coronavirus</strong><br><a href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus">https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus</a></p><p> <strong>Autism Speaks Canada has a challenging behavior toolkit</strong><br><a href="https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/challenging-behaviors-tool-kit1/">https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/challenging-behaviors-tool-kit1/</a></p><p> <strong>Visual schedules, reward systems and social stories</strong><br>Resources for special educators, therapists and families<br><a href="https://connectability.ca/2020/03/30/dealing-with-covid-19-resources-for-special-educators-therapists-families/">https://connectability.ca/2020/03/30/dealing-with-covid-19-resources-for-special-educators-therapists-families/</a></p><p>Visual support and schedules<br> <a href="https://www.kidsability.ca/uploads/Autism%20Services/AutismServices_VisualSupportsHandout.pdf">https://www.kidsability.ca/uploads/Autism%20Services/AutismServices_VisualSupportsHandout.pdf</a><br> <span><a href="https://www.naturalbeachliving.com/daily-visual-schedule/">https://www.naturalbeachliving.com/daily-visual-schedule/</a></span><br> <a href="https://adayinourshoes.com/free-printable-visual-schedules-for-home-and-daily-routines/">https://adayinourshoes.com/free-printable-visual-schedules-for-home-and-daily-routines/</a><br> <a href="https://www.sparklebox.co.uk/1801-1805/sb1801.html#.VQGfXI7F_1Z">https://www.sparklebox.co.uk/1801-1805/sb1801.html#.VQGfXI7F_1Z</a><br> <a href="https://do2learn.com/picturecards/VisualSchedules/index.htm">https://do2learn.com/picturecards/VisualSchedules/index.htm</a></p><p>Visual schedule maker<br><a href="https://connectability.ca/visuals-engine/">https://connectability.ca/visuals-engine/</a></p><p>Token Reward Systems<br><em>Explanation of a token system</em><br><a href="http://www.educateautism.com/token-economy.html">http://www.educateautism.com/token-economy.html</a><br><em>Examples of token systems</em><br><a href="https://www.earlywood.org/Page/558">https://www.earlywood.org/Page/558</a><br><a href="https://www.verywellfamily.com/create-a-token-economy-system-to-improve-child-behavior-1094888">https://www.verywellfamily.com/create-a-token-economy-system-to-improve-child-behavior-1094888</a></p><p>First/Then Boards – simple activity and reward system<br> <a href="https://www.erinoakkids.ca/ErinoakKids/files/f9/f9e82917-4dc7-40ca-901e-3a27591b2c0a.pdf">https://www.erinoakkids.ca/ErinoakKids/files/f9/f9e82917-4dc7-40ca-901e-3a27591b2c0a.pdf</a><br><a href="https://autismclassroomresources.com/visual-schedule-series-first-then/">https://autismclassroomresources.com/visual-schedule-series-first-then/</a><br><a href="https://www.tdsb.on.ca/Portals/0/Leadership/Ward12/AutismHandout_First-Then%20Strategy.pdf">https://www.tdsb.on.ca/Portals/0/Leadership/Ward12/AutismHandout_First-Then%20Strategy.pdf</a></p><p> <strong>Social Stories</strong><br> <em>Explanation of a social story</em><br> <a href="https://autismcanada.org/living-with-autism/treatments/non-medical/communication/social-stories/">https://autismcanada.org/living-with-autism/treatments/non-medical/communication/social-stories/</a><br> <em>COVID19 social stories</em><br> <a href="https://www.flipsnack.com/KeshetChicago/coronavirus-social-story/full-view.html">https://www.flipsnack.com/KeshetChicago/coronavirus-social-story/full-view.html</a><br> <a href="https://theautismeducator.ie/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/The-Corona-Virus-Free-Printable-Updated-2-The-Autism-Educator-.pdf">https://theautismeducator.ie/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/The-Corona-Virus-Free-Printable-Updated-2-The-Autism-Educator-.pdf</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Supporting_your_child_with_a_neurodevelopmental_disorder_through_the_COVID-19_crisis.jpgCOVID-19: Supporting your childMain
Toe walking, idiopathicToe walking, idiopathicToe walking, idiopathicTEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)Lower leg;Foot;ToesSkeletal muscleConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-04-28T04:00:00Z6.6000000000000073.60000000000001187.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Idiopathic toe walking is when your child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age. Learn stretches and strengthening exercises, and about proper shoes to help your child.<br></p><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Lower half of child standing on toes" /> </figure> <p>Most children begin walking at 12 to 14 months with their feet flat on the ground. However, there are some children who begin walking on their tip toes instead. This pattern normally disappears within three to six months of learning how to walk. It almost always is completely gone by the end of the third year.</p><p>Idiopathic toe walking is when a child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age. They will often stand with their feet flat on the ground, but when walking or running will prefer to be on their toes. If your child does not outgrow tip toe walking by three years of age, take them to see a health-care professional. </p> <br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Idiopathic toe walking is when a child continues to walk on their tip toes beyond three years of age.</li> <li>Idiopathic toe walking can lead to tight calf muscles and decreased movement of the ankles.</li> <li>Treatment for children younger than six years of age includes calf stretches, Achilles tendon stretches and sit to stand exercises.</li> <li>Treatment for children six years of age and older includes calf stretches and other exercises, including marching on the spot, walking uphill and on uneven surfaces, heel walking and squats.</li> </ul><h2>Features of idiopathic toe walking</h2> <p>Although we do not really know why some children prefer to walk on their toes, we do know that idiopathic toe walkers:</p> <ul> <li>walk on tip toes on both sides</li> <li>are constantly balancing on their toes</li> <li>are physically able to keep up with other children their age</li> <li>walk with straight knees</li> <li>will often be able to stand with their feet flat on the ground</li> <li>often have a family history of toe walking</li> </ul><h2>Help your child with a home exercise program</h2><p>If your child has idiopathic toe walking, a daily home exercise program can be very helpful. The goal is to stretch the calf muscles and strengthen the muscles on the front of the legs. This will help your child to be able to successfully walk with a heel-to-toe pattern.</p><p>If your child's calf muscles are tight, or ankle motion is limited, you will be shown stretches to do at home with them. These stretches should be followed with activities to help them use their muscles in their new lengthened position.</p><p>These exercises will be necessary and beneficial as long as your child demonstrates a tip toe walking pattern. The exercises will vary with their age. The most important part of the exercise program is to remember to have fun with your child!</p><h2>Stretches and strengthening exercises for children under six years of age</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Calf stretch</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_calfstretch_under6_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Hand pushing child’s foot upward toward their head with the leg held straight" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child lie on their back on a comfortable surface such as a firm bed.</li><li>With their knee straight and leg supported on the bed, bring your child's foot upwards, toward their head, bending their ankle.</li><li>Hold the stretch at the end of the movement (that is, as far as your child's range of motion will permit) for 15 to 30 seconds. This should not be painful for your child.</li><li>Bring your child's foot back to a normal position. Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Achilles tendon stretch</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_achillesstretch_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Hand pushing child’s foot upward toward their head with leg bent at the knee" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child lie on their back on a comfortable surface such as a firm bed.</li><li>With their knee bent, bring your child's foot upwards, toward their head, bending their ankle.</li><li>Hold the stretch at the end of the movement (that is, as far as your child's range of motion will permit) for 15 to 30 seconds. This should not be painful for your child.</li><li>Bring your child's foot back to a normal position. Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Sit to stand</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_toe_walking_sit_to_stand_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Child standing up from stool while parent holds their ankles" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child sit on a children's sized chair or stool.</li><li>Place your hands below their knees, providing a moderate, constant pressure downwards as a cue to keep their heels on the floor.</li><li>Have your child practice standing up while keeping their heels on the ground.</li><li>Make this exercise fun by playing a game of high five, blowing bubbles, reaching for objects, working in front of a mirror or singing songs.</li></ul></li></ul><h2>Exercises suitable for children ages six years and up:</h2><ul class="akh-steps"><li><h3>Calf Stretch</h3> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_calfstretch_6up_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Child standing facing a wall with both hands on the wall with one leg stretched behind them and one stepped toward the wall" /> </figure> <ul><li>Have your child stand approximately two feet from a wall. Place both of their hands at shoulder height against the wall.</li><li>With their right knee straight, have them step towards the wall with the left foot. They should lean in until a stretch is felt in the back of the right calf. Make sure they keep the heel of the right foot on the ground.</li><li>Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.</li><li>Repeat the exercise 10 times on each leg, daily.</li></ul></li><li><h3>Other exercises include:</h3> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Squats</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Idiopathic_walking_squats_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Child squatting with someone supporting them by the hands" /> </figure> <ul><li>Marching on the spot. Have your child bring their knees up high and then land with a flat foot.</li><li>Walking uphill.</li><li>Walking on uneven surfaces such as in a playground or sand.</li><li>Walking on the heels only. Keep the toes off the ground at all times.</li><li>Practicing squats. With feet flat on the floor, hip width apart, have your child slowly lower their body all the way to the floor by bending at their knees and hips but keeping their chest upright.<br><br><br></li></ul></li></ul><h2>Identify toe walking early to prevent muscle problems</h2> <p>Children who walk on their toes can develop tight calf muscles on the backs of their legs and have decreased movement of their ankles. In addition, the muscles on the front of their legs may become weak. If there is tightness and weakness, your child will have difficulty walking on their heels. Early identification of toe walking can help lead to the prevention of these muscle problems.</p><h2>Shoes for your child</h2> <p>Wearing shoes may not correct toe walking. However, appropriate foot wear can help your child bring their heels further down. When selecting shoes for your child, keep in mind the following criteria:</p> <ul> <li>Choose a high cut shoe with a wide sole that provides good foot support.</li> <li>The shoe should be rigid or firm, not flexible in the middle section.</li> <li>The back of the heel should be firm.</li> </ul> <h2>Other treatments</h2> <p>Idiopathic toe walking in children is not a serious condition. It often resolves spontaneously and does not cause the child significant problems apart from the cosmetic appearance. Normally, your child will not need surgery. In addition to stretching and strengthening, treatments may include repeated casting of feet and ankles, bracing devices, or a combination of the two. It is important to understand that even though your child may achieve short-term improvement in muscle length and ankle range of motion, these treatments may not always guarantee a normal heel-to-toe walking pattern.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/toe_walking_ideopathic.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/toe_walking_ideopathic.jpg Learn stretches and strengthening exercises and about proper shoes to help your child if they walk on their toes beyond three years of age.Main

 

 

AllergiesAllergiesAllergiesAEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Cough;Eye discomfort and redness;Runny nose;Rash;Wheezing2019-04-01T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000062.90000000000001328.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>This page explains what allergies are, types of allergens, the signs and symptoms of allergies, and also the causes. It also gives examples of common allergies and what to do if your child has an allergic reaction. </p><h2>What is an allergy?</h2><p>The immune system protects us by attacking harmful substances such as viruses and bacteria. An allergy is the immune system’s response to a substance called an allergen.</p><p>The allergen is not harmful for most people. However, when a child has an allergy, the immune system treats the allergen as an invader and over-reacts to it. This results in symptoms from mild discomfort to severe distress.</p><p>Allergic disorders, including food allergies, are common in childhood. Many children with allergies also have asthma.<br></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUmzcbxtTISAf4xNX8Lm2FL" frameborder="0"></iframe><br></div><p>For more videos from SickKids experts in collaboration with Youngster, visit <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoKMd2cYwegtZX19uHdNLQA">Youngster on YouTube</a>.</p><h2>Types of allergens</h2><h3>Common airborne allergens</h3><p>Dust mites are common airborne allergens. These tiny bugs live in warm, damp, dusty places in your home and survive by eating dead skin cells. Their waste is a major cause of allergies and asthma.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Common_airborne_allergens_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Illustration of moulds, dust mites, pollens, pet dander and cockroaches" /> </figure> <p>Other common airborne allergens include:</p><ul><li>pollen from flowers and other plants</li><li>mould</li><li>pet dander (dead skin cells from pets)</li><li>cockroaches</li></ul></div></div></div><h3>Common food allergens</h3><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Common_food_allergens_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Illustration of eggs, nuts, shellfish, fish and milk" /> </figure> <p>The most common food allergens include:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=809&language=English">peanuts</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=812&language=English">tree nuts</a> such as hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds, and cashews</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=806&language=English">eggs</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=808&language=English">cow's milk</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=813&language=English">wheat</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=805&language=English">soy</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=807&language=English">fish</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=810&language=English">shellfish</a></li></ul></div></div></div><p>Even small amounts of these foods can trigger anaphylaxis in some allergic children. <a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English">Anaphylaxis</a> is the most severe type of allergic reaction. Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency. Your child may experience a skin rash (e.g. hives), breathing difficulties, stomach upset (e.g. vomiting) and low blood pressure (e.g. shock). This is a medical emergency and requires immediate medical care. Give <a href="/article?contentid=130&language=English">epinephrine</a> (if available) and call an ambulance.</p><p>Food allergens can also be hidden in common party dishes such as cookies, cakes, candies or other foods. Always ask the cook or the host if dishes contain foods your child is allergic to.</p><p>Far more people have a food intolerance than a food allergy. Unlike a food allergy, a food intolerance does not involve an immune reaction. Rather, it produces unpleasant symptoms as food is digested. These symptoms appear over a few hours rather than as soon as the food is swallowed or inhaled.</p><h3>Other common allergens</h3><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=800&language=English">Insect bites or stings</a></li><li>Medicines</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>An allergy is the immune system’s response to a substance that is not harmful to most people.</li><li>If you suspect that your child has an allergy, an allergist can do tests to find out exactly what is causing the allergy and discuss with you how to manage these allergies.</li><li>To reduce your child’s exposure to airborne allergens, have a pet-free home and remove carpeting.</li><li>To manage a food allergy, make sure your child avoids all foods they are allergic to, learns how to read food labels and ask about the ingredients in served food.</li><li>If your child has a severe allergy, tell their teachers and other caregivers.</li><li>If you suspect your child is having an anaphylactic reaction, give epinephrine (if available) and call 911. </li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of allergies</h2><p>Allergic reactions will vary from child to child and from allergen to allergen. Where you live can also affect the type and severity of the allergy.<br></p><h3>Symptoms for airborne allergens</h3><p>Common symptoms with airborne allergens may include:</p><ul><li>sneezing</li><li>itchy nose or throat</li><li>stuffy or runny nose</li><li>red, itchy and/or watery eyes</li><li>coughing</li><li>wheezing or shortness of breath</li><li>headaches or plugged ears</li></ul><h3>Symptoms for food allergens and insect bites or stings</h3><p>Your child’s response to a food allergy or insect bite will depend on how sensitive they are to that food or bug. Symptoms can include:</p><ul><li>itchy mouth and throat when food is swallowed</li><li>skin rashes, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">hives</a> (raised, red, itchy bumps)</li><li>swelling of the face or throat</li><li>breathing problems, such as wheezing</li><li>coughing, sneezing</li><li>vomiting or diarrhea</li><li>itchy, runny or stuffy nose</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=782&language=English">conjunctivitis</a> (red, swollen eyes) or itchy, watery eyes</li><li>shock</li></ul><h2>What causes an allergic reaction?</h2><p>Allergens may come in contact with the skin or be breathed in, eaten or injected.</p><p>When the body detects an allergen, it sends a signal to the immune system to produce antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE). Those antibodies cause certain cells in the body to release chemicals called histamines. Histamines travel through the bloodstream to fight the invading substance or allergen.</p><p>Your child’s allergic reaction depends on which part of their body has been exposed to the allergen. Most commonly, allergic reactions affect the eyes, inside of the nose, throat, lungs or skin.</p><h2>What your child's doctor can do for allergies</h2><p>If you suspect your child has an allergy, consult an allergist. This is a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies.</p><p>To identify your child's allergy, the allergist will usually:</p><ul><li>examine your child</li><li>ask for your child’s allergy history</li><li>ask for a description of your child’s allergic symptoms</li></ul><p>Your child might then have skin tests, blood tests, a chest X-ray, a lung function test or an exercise tolerance test. The doctor will explain these tests to you.</p><p>When the tests are done, the allergist will use the results to make a diagnosis. You and your child will meet the allergist at a later date to discuss them.</p><h3>How to prepare for an allergy test</h3><p>Your child may need to stop using certain medications for a period of time before an allergy test. These medications may include antihistamines. Always ask your doctor if your child should stop taking medications before the visit.</p><h2>Taking care of your child with an allergy at home</h2><p>If your child has a severe allergy, your doctor might give you a prescription for an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen). Your doctor can show you how and when to use the auto-injector. You or your child may need to carry one at all times.</p><p>As much as possible, try to prevent allergic reactions by reducing your child's contact with the allergen(s). The steps you take depend on the substance to which your child is allergic. Discuss this with your child's doctor.</p><h2>How to prevent allergic reactions</h2><h3>Airborne allergens</h3><ul><li>Have a pet-free home. Or if you have a pet, keep it out of the child’s room and bathe it regularly.</li><li>Remove carpets and rugs from the home, especially from your child’s bedroom. Hard floor surfaces do not collect dust as much as carpets do. If you have carpeting, you should try to vacuum at least once a week.</li><li>Reduce the relative humidity in the home.</li><li>Wash bedding in hot water. This will help reduce dust mites.</li><li>Control contact with outdoor pollen by closing windows in peak seasons. Use an air conditioning system with a small-particle filter.</li><li>Get rid of items in the home that collect dust. These include heavy drapes or old, unclean furniture.</li><li>Clean your home often. Change your home furnace filter regularly as recommended.</li><li>Seal pillows and mattresses if your child is allergic to dust mites.</li><li>Keep bathrooms and other mould-prone areas clean and dry.</li></ul><h3>Food allergens</h3><p>Your child must avoid all foods they are allergic to. Some children may outgrow their allergies, but others may have to avoid the allergen for life.</p><p>Avoiding a food allergen can be difficult. As a result, many children unintentionally eat food they are allergic to.</p><p>If your child has a food allergy, teach them to be aware of the foods to avoid and all the possible names of those foods. You and your child should learn to read labels on food packaging and ask questions about served food. Your child should also know why it is important to look for an allergen in ingredients.</p><p>It is also important to tell all caregivers about your child’s allergy and any foods or drinks your child must avoid.<br></p><h2>When to get medical help for an allergic reaction</h2><p>Call 911 or take your child to the nearest emergency department if they have anaphylaxis. Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis may include:</p><ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">hives</a>, itching, redness of the skin</li><li>swollen eyes, lips, tongue or face</li><li>difficulty breathing, tightness of the throat or difficulty swallowing</li><li>abdominal (belly) pain, nausea, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or sudden onset of <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a></li><li>coughing</li><li>stuffy and/or runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing</li><li><a href="/Article?contentid=779&language=English">fainting</a>, confusion, lightheadedness or dizziness</li><li>rapid or irregular heartbeats</li><li>cold, clammy, sweaty skin</li><li>voice changes</li></ul><p>Your child should go to the nearest emergency department even if they have received epinephrine (EpiPen), as the symptoms can start again hours after the epinephrine is given.</p><h2>​Virtual care services for children<br></h2><p>Boomerang Health was opened by SickKids to provide communities in Ontario with greater access to community-based services for children and adolescents. For more information on virtual care services in Ontario to support a child with allergies, visit <a href="http://www.boomeranghealth.com/services/allergy/">Boomerang Health</a> powered by SickKids.<br></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/allergies.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />allergiesallergieshttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/allergies.jpg Read about what allergies are, types of allergens, the signs and symptoms of allergies and how to respond to an allergic reaction. Main
How to become more resilientHow to become more resilientHow to become more resilientHEnglishAdolescent;Psychiatry;PreventionTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000066.5000000000000631.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what mindfulness is, how it can help you to build resilience and lower your stress levels, and different methods to practise mindfulness everyday.</p><h2>Learn about mindfulness</h2><p>Mindfulness involves paying attention, on purpose, with kindness. Think about it as the opposite of multi-tasking. Instead of switching between lots of things, you’re paying full attention to and being completely aware of what you’re doing from one moment to the next. Mindfulness can be seen as a way of life.<br></p><p>Mindfulness, including both formal and informal meditation, is linked to lower stress levels, more even moods, better memory and concentration and a stronger immune system. </p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QTsUEOUaWpY?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Everyday mindfulness</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains what everyday mindfulness is, and how being aware of what is going on around you and inside of you can help make life more enjoyable and less stressful.</p></div><h3>Formal mindfulness</h3><p>This involves choosing something to pay attention to, for example your breath. Then, when you get distracted, you may notice where your attention went and bring it back to your breath (or whatever you had been focusing on before). </p><p>Distractions will happen; everybody gets distracted. The distractions might be thoughts, emotions or physical sensations in your body. </p><p>But noticing when you are distracted can be a good thing. It means you were paying attention! Gently and with kindness, you can then bring your attention back to your breath. </p><p>It is important not to be too hard on yourself. Mindfulness may sound simple but that doesn’t mean it is easy. Being kind to yourself is just as important as practising focusing your attention. </p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xcO8IIeV12M?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title">Mindfulness of thoughts</span> <span class="vid-type">audio</span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This audio meditation helps you slow down the thoughts in your mind and meditate on them. Use this practice when you are feeling distracted with too many thoughts in your mind. You may stand, sit or lie down to follow along. Try to find a comfortable position that will not require you to move around.</p></div><h3>Informal mindfulness</h3><p>This involves paying total attention to activities you do in your everyday life, like eating or brushing your teeth. </p><p>Consider informal mindfulness an open awareness of the thoughts, feelings, memories or physical sensations that come up while you’re doing everyday things. It is important to do this with kindness and allow yourself to notice whatever surfaces without criticizing yourself.</p><p>Everybody has judgments throughout the day, but try to notice them and be kind to yourself when they are there. Remember, having various thoughts, feelings or sensations doesn’t mean you have to act on them.</p><h2>Take care of yourself</h2><p>Create a list of things that help you feel relaxed and be sure to do them regularly. These can be things like meditating, taking a bath, taking deep breaths, listening to relaxing music or getting a massage. It doesn’t matter what you do as long as it is something that you enjoy and that makes you feel calm.</p><h2>Remember how you have coped in the past</h2><p>When the going gets tough, remember the hurdles you have overcome or accomplishments you have already made. How did you do it? What skills and strategies helped you? Thinking back on how you have succeeded in the past can help you use the same skills in the future.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0QXmmP4psbA?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>You are not your thoughts</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains some of the things you can try when you feel overwhelmed by your thoughts. After the video, take a few moments to observe your thoughts with curiosity, paying attention to how each one makes you feel. Paying attention to your thoughts and sorting through them takes practice and patience.</p></div><div id="ymhp-animation" class="asset-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/YMHP-UnhelpfulThoughts/MentalHealth-UnhelpfulThoughts.html"></iframe>  <br></div><h2>Practise daily gratitude</h2><p>When people are feeling stressed out or struggling with physical, emotional or social issues, it can be hard to be thankful.</p><p>But try to pick a time of day and think of three things that you have been thankful or grateful for from the previous 24 hours. Be as detailed and specific as you can. You can pick something seemingly small, like finding money in an old coat pocket, catching the bus just in time or having someone hold a door for you.<br></p><h2>Stay in touch with friends and take time to thank others</h2><p>If you haven’t spoken to someone in a while, contact them. Take the time to think of someone who has been helpful to you every day and let them know. This can be in an email, a text or a chat in person. Staying connected with friends and showing them gratitude can do a lot to support your own resilience.</p><p>Remember that resilience is a way of life. Practising these skills and strategies is something you do every day, not just when you are feeling stressed or having a hard time. When you practise them on neutral or good days, you will find it easier to use them on the hard days.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cFCiUlFKuO4?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>Two wings to fly</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains the value of balancing mindfulness and compassion. Use it to help you respond to change and other unwanted experiences. Mindfulness helps you find opportunities to understand your situation more clearly. Compassion helps you respond with kindness and less judgment. After you watch the video, think about how you can practise mindfulness and show compassion towards yourself and others.</p></div><p>For more information on mindfulness, check out the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/patient-family-resources/child-family-centred-care/spiritual-care/the-mindfulness-project/index.html">SickKids Mindfulness Project</a> website.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_to_become_more_resilient.jpgYou are not your thoughts It can sometimes feel as if we are swimming in a sea of our own thoughts. Learn some strategies to try when thoughts become overwhelming.Teens
Hepatitis C: Information for teenagersHepatitis C: Information for teenagersHepatitis C: Information for teenagersHEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LiverImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_liver_EN.jpg2015-10-05T04:00:00Z8.9000000000000057.90000000000001638.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hepatitis C is a virus that affects the liver. Find out how you can live with the disease as a teenager.</p><figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Liver</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_liver_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the liver in a girl’s digestive system" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The liver is an organ that is part of our digestive system. It helps us get rid of toxins, digest food, and store energy from food.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>What is hepatitis C?</h2><p>Hepatitis C is liver disease caused by a virus.</p><p>The <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1468&language=English">liver</a> is an organ in our abdomen (belly). It helps our bodies remove toxins and waste. It also helps us digest food and stores the energy we get from food. The word "hepatitis" means that there is inflammation of the liver. Inflammation of the liver can affect the liver’s ability to work properly. Hepatitis can be caused by infections (virus, bacteria or parasites), drugs or toxins (including alcohol). There are several types of viruses that can cause hepatitis. One of these viruses is the hepatitis C virus. Over time, hepatitis C may cause irritation and scarring in the liver, making it difficult for your liver to work properly.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Hepatitis C is an infection due to a virus called hepatitis C virus. People can get hepatitis C by contact with blood, including on contaminated needles, and during pregnancy or delivery from mother to baby.</li> <li>Alcohol and drugs can further damage your liver; you should avoid them.</li> <li>There are medications available that may cure your hepatitis C. Talk to your health-care provider about your treatment options.</li> <li>When you are ready to have a baby, talk to your health-care team about your hepatitis C status. </li> </ul><h2>How do people get hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The hepatitis C virus may be spread from person to person by blood contact, and during pregnancy or delivery from mother to baby.</p> <ul> <li>Many children with hepatitis C were born to mothers who are also infected with the virus. The hepatitis C virus can be passed to the baby either during pregnancy or delivery, although this happens rarely, in only about 5% of pregnancies.</li> <li>Rarely, people can get hepatitis C if they share personal items that may have the blood of someone with hepatitis C on them (such as toothbrushes, nail clippers or razors).</li> <li>It is possible to get the virus from a blood transfusion, from other blood products or from improperly cleaned medical equipment. This almost never happens in Canada.</li> <li>Anyone can get hepatitis C from sharing needles, such as the needles used for body piercing, tattooing, acupuncture or intravenous drug use.</li> <li>Hepatitis C is only rarely transmitted by having sex, except in people who also have the <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=910&language=English">HIV virus or AIDS</a>. Using condoms reduces the risk of sexual transmission of hepatitis C and other infections.</li> </ul> <p>Hepatitis C cannot be spread to other people by hugging, kissing, sneezing, coughing or breastfeeding.</p><h2>How can I protect others from hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The risk of spreading hepatitis C infection is very low in regular day-to-day activity. If you have hepatitis C, you should not share your toothbrush or other personal items that may have traces of blood on them (razors and nail clippers). You should not let other people touch your blood, and you should not touch the blood of others.</p><h2>What tests can tell me how I am doing with hepatitis C?</h2> <p>Several tests can be done to tell us about the hepatitis C virus and how it is affecting your liver. Common helpful tests include:</p> <ul> <li>Hepatitis C viral load: This test tells how much hepatitis C virus is in your blood.</li> <li>Hepatitis C genotype: This blood test shows what subtype (or genotype) of hepatitis C is present. The genotype helps to show how likely it is that the virus will respond to treatment.</li> <li>Blood tests for liver enzymes (ALT and AST): The levels of these enzymes in the blood indicate how much inflammation is occurring in your liver. High levels mean there is more liver inflammation. A lot of inflammation over time can lead to scarring of the liver.</li> <li>Other blood tests can help show if bad scarring has developed in the liver.</li> <li><a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=1290&language=English">Ultrasound scan</a>: An ultrasound scan of the liver can help tell how healthy it is, and may show signs of bad scarring if this is present. Another ultrasound test, such as "Fibroscan", can also check the stiffness of the liver which helps show mild or moderate amounts of scarring.</li> </ul> <h2>What happens if I get scarring in my liver?</h2> <p>Many people live their whole lives with hepatitis C without significant damage to their liver. However, as people age the risk of scarring in the liver increases. Mild scarring in the liver does not usually affect the way the liver works. Severe scarring (cirrhosis) may make it difficult for the liver to work properly. Cirrhosis only rarely happens in children and teenagers with hepatitis C.</p> <p>Chronic hepatitis C infection also increases the risk for liver cancer, especially if it has caused bad liver scarring. However, liver cancer is very rare in children and teenagers with hepatitis C.</p> <p>Regular medical follow-up throughout your life is important. This should allow problems in your liver to be identified and treated early, which may prevent you from becoming sick.</p> <h2>Treatment for hepatitis C</h2> <p>Talk to your health-care provider about your treatment options. Everyone is unique and so is their condition. As a result, recommended treatments are different too.</p> <p>Most teens wait until adulthood to receive treatment for hepatitis C, as long as there is no sign that their liver is developing significant damage.</p> <p>Many new medications for hepatitis C treatment have become available for adults in the last couple of years. These medications are taken by mouth for several weeks and cure more than 90% of people infected with the hepatitis C virus. Unfortunately, these new medications are only approved for use in adult.</p> <p>However, other medications are available for teens. Combination therapy with interferon injections and oral anti-viral medications can be used in childhood. It cures between 50% (half) and 80% (about three quarters) of patients, depending on the genotype of the virus.</p><h2>Will my hepatitis C infection disappear?</h2> <p>Many people that get hepatitis C infection manage to get rid of the virus within a few months and become well again. For most people, however, the hepatitis C infection does not go away. If it lasts for more than six months, it is called chronic hepatitis C. When you have chronic hepatitis C, it is most likely you will keep the infection throughout your life unless you receive treatment for the virus.</p> <p>There are medications that can cure hepatitis C in some people, but some of these medicines are only available for adults. You should discuss your treatment options with your health-care provider. While you may receive treatment for hepatitis C at some point in your lifetime, you may have to wait until you are an adult.</p> <h2>Can people tell I have hepatitis C?</h2> <p>Most young people with hepatitis C look completely well and have no symptoms or signs that they have the virus. Most people with hepatitis C usually feel well and participate in school, work and other activities.</p> <h2>How can I keep my liver healthy?</h2> <p>There are many things that help your liver stay healthy.</p> <ul> <li>A healthy diet with plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit helps provide antioxidants that protect the liver from the bad effects of inflammation.</li> <li>Regular physical activity when combined with a healthy diet keeps weight under control. Being overweight will often cause extra difficulty for the liver and may cause liver scarring to develop more quickly.</li> <li>Be careful with herbal, natural or other alternative or complementary treatments. Check with your doctor before taking any herbal medications, as some of these may harm the liver. </li> <li>Be careful about other medications because some medications are processed by the liver. If you need medication for other health conditions, follow the instructions carefully or ask your health-care provider or pharmacist for advice. </li> <li>Get immunized. You should have all of the recommended immunizations available and be immunized against <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=819&language=English">hepatitis A</a> and <a href="https://akhpub.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=827&language=English">B</a>.</li> <li>Avoid alcohol and other types of drugs that may damage the liver.</li> </ul> <h2>Does drinking alcohol or taking drugs hurt my liver?</h2> <p>Drinking alcohol often or drinking alcohol in large amounts can cause irritation in your liver and may lead to scarring over time. When you have hepatitis C, this scarring may happen sooner and be worse than in a person who does not have hepatitis C. It is unknown how much alcohol you can drink safely before it starts to damage your liver. The best thing to do is to either drink no alcohol or drink as little as possible.</p> <p>Taking street drugs, even marijuana, may also damage your liver or other organs. Some drugs may cause severe liver damage the first time you try them. Avoid street drugs if you do not want to further damage your liver.</p> <h2>Who do I have to tell about my hepatitis C status?</h2> <p>People who should know about your hepatitis C are your health-care providers, such as your doctors, nurses and dentist. Not everyone needs to know about hepatitis C. It is up to you who you tell about your hepatitis C infection. Friends, family and teachers do not have to be told unless you feel comfortable doing so.</p> <p>Some university courses and jobs, like medical school and being a doctor or dentist, require you to share information about your hepatitis C status with them. If you are unsure about the need to tell someone about your hepatitis C infection, discuss this with your parents, caregiver and your healthcare provider.</p><h2>If I ever have children, will they have hepatitis C?</h2> <p>The risk of a mom passing hepatitis C on to her baby is quite low, approximately 5%. If you are a father-to-be, your baby will not be at risk for hepatitis C before they are born, unless the mother is also infected.</p> World Hepatitis Day is July 28. Learn about hepatitis C, a virus that affects the liver, and find out how to live with the disease as a teen. Main
FaintingFaintingFaintingFEnglishNAToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyCardiovascular systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-07-22T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000066.7000000000000501.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Discover the signs and symptoms of fainting, what causes it and how to help your child if they have fainted.</p><p>Fainting, also called syncope, happens when a person suddenly loses consciousness and then rapidly returns to normal.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Fainting is a sudden and temporary loss of consciousness with a rapid return to normal.</li><li>Your child may feel dizzy, nauseous, hot or cold right before they faint. Their face may also go pale.</li><li>The most common cause of fainting is a drop in blood pressure. Other, more serious, causes include an underlying heart condition, low blood sugar or a seizure.</li><li>See your child's doctor to discuss the possible cause of any fainting episode. Call 911 if your child has stopped breathing or does not “come around” shortly after fainting.​​</li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of fainting</h2> <p>Right before fainting, your child might:</p> <ul> <li>feel dizzy or light headed</li> <li>feel weak</li> <li>see dark spots</li> <li>hear muffled sounds</li> <li>feel nauseous (want to <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomit​</a>)</li> <li>feel hot</li> <li>feel cold and clammy</li> <li>become pale</li> <li>start to sweat</li> </ul><h2>Causes of fainting</h2><p>Fainting can happen for a number of reasons. The most common cause of fainting is a temporary slowing of the heart rate and a drop in blood pressure. This type of fainting is called a “vagal” or “vasovagal” episode.</p><p>A child is more likely to have a drop in blood pressure if they:</p><ul><li>are <a href="/Article?contentid=776&language=English">dehydrated</a> (from excessive sweating, diarrhea or vomiting)</li><li>have not been eating</li><li>have been standing still for a long time</li><li>are unwell</li></ul><h2>Other common causes of fainting</h2><p>A child might also faint if they</p><ul><li>are frightened</li><li>are in severe pain</li><li>stand up too fast</li></ul><p>Fainting may be more likely in a closed setting or one that is hot and humid. It may also happen in response to a stimulus that is noxious (unpleasant or potentially harmful), such as a very bad smell or the sight of blood or a needle.</p><h2>Conditions that appear similar to fainting<br></h2><p>There are some conditions that make it appear that a child is fainting when something else is wrong. These mimics of fainting include:</p><ul><li>an underlying heart condition or heart rhythm disturbance</li><li>exposure to a medication, toxin or drug</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1726&language=English">hypoglycemia</a> (low blood sugar)<br></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English">anaphylaxis</a> (allergic reaction)</li><li> <a href="/article?contentid=2057&language=English">seizures</a></li><li>migraine <a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headaches​</a></li><li>hyperventilation</li><li>panic attacks<br></li></ul><p>Fainting during exercise or exertion (carrying or pushing something heavy) can be a sign of an underlying condition and should be discussed with your child's doctor.</p><h2>How to help your child if they have fainted</h2> <ul> <li>Check to make sure your child is breathing. If necessary, call 911.</li> <li>Keep your child lying down or, if possible, sit them forward with their head between their knees.</li> <li>Loosen any tight clothing around your child's neck.</li> <li>Make an appointment with your child's doctor and explain exactly what happened.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <p>See your child's doctor to identify the cause of a fainting episode.</p> <p>Call 911 right away if your child:</p> <ul> <li>has stopped breathing</li> <li>does not quickly become alert after fainting<br></li> <li>has changes in their speech, vision or ability to move</li> </ul>faintingfaintinghttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fainting.jpg Discover the signs and symptoms of fainting, what causes it and how to help your child if they have fainted.Main
Fingernail infection (paronychia)Fingernail infection (paronychia)Fingernail infection (paronychia)FEnglishDermatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Fingers;ToesNailsConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-05-10T04:00:00Z8.0000000000000062.7000000000000497.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An overview of fingernail infections including possible causes, treatment and when to see a doctor.</p><h2>What is a fingernail infection? </h2><p>Fingernail infections occur on or near the edge of the nail. Most of the time, fingernail infections are not serious but they can be painful. This type of infection can also form on the toenails.​</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Nail infections can occur on the hands and the feet.</li> <li>Nail biting and finger sucking can cause breaks in the skin, allowing bacteria to enter. </li> <li>Symptoms include swelling, redness and tenderness of the area where the nail meets the tissue of the finger. </li> <li>Clean the infected nail three times a day with warm water and an antibacterial soap.</li> <li>If the infection has not gone away after four or five days, seek medical attention.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of a fingernail infection</h2> <p>Signs and symptoms may include: </p> <ul> <li>Swelling where the finger meets the nail </li> <li>Redness and mild tenderness surrounding the infected area </li> <li>A blister filled with pus or pus draining from the swollen area </li> </ul><h2>Causes of a fingernail infection</h2> <p>Fingernail infections are caused by bacteria entering the skin around the nail. Nail biting, ingrown nails and finger sucking can cause skin breakdown, allowing bacteria to enter. Pushing the cuticle down or trimming the cuticle (which is usually done as part of a manicure) can also lead to infection. </p><h2>Treatment of a fingernail infection</h2> <h3>Antiseptic soaks </h3> <p>Soak the affected area in warm water with an antibacterial soap. Do this three times a day for 10 to 20 minutes at a time. If the infection has not cleared after four or five days, make an appointment to see your child's doctor. </p> <h3>Draining </h3> <p>In most cases, pus will drain on its own after soaking the infection. You may need to apply a bit of pressure by gently rubbing or squeezing the area with a damp cloth or cotton swab. If this does not work, then see your doctor. You doctor may take a small needle to open up the affected area and drain the pus.</p> <h3>Antibiotics </h3> <p>You can try applying an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment such as Polysporin to the infected area two to three times per day. The best time to apply this ointment is after the area has been soaked in warm water for 10 to 20 minutes. If the infection persists, your child's doctor may prescribe a stronger antibiotic ointment to fight the infection. Apply the ointment as directed until the infection disappears. If the infection appears to be spreading beyond the nail, your child's doctor may prescribe an oral antibiotic. </p> <h3>Prevention </h3> <p>Encourage your child to not bite, pick or chew their fingernails. Use nail clippers instead. Avoid pushing cuticles down and do not trim the cuticle. </p><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p>Make an appointment with your child's doctor if: </p><ul><li>your child develops a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li>the infection has not cleared after four or five days</li><li>the area of redness or swelling is getting bigger</li><li>the area is hot and painful</li></ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fingernail_infection.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fingernail_infection.jpgFingernail infection An easy-to-understand overview of fingernail infections including possible causes, treatment and when to see a doctor. Main
Safe outdoor mealsSafe outdoor mealsSafe outdoor mealsSEnglishPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-06-11T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000067.9000000000000731.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Follow these tips for safe and tasty outdoor meals during the summer months.</p><p>On a hot summer day, there are few things nicer than a picnic or barbecue. Both offer a great opportunity to get outside, enjoy healthy foods in season and spend time with family and friends.<br></p><p>To make sure your dining experience is remembered for fun rather than food poisoning, follow these tips for tasty and safe summertime meals.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Wash hands carefully before and after handling food.</li><li>Keep raw meat, seafood and poultry separate from other food.</li><li>Use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of barbecued meat.</li> <li>For picnics, bring plenty of water and balance treats with whole grains, vegetables and fruit, and lean protein choices.</li><li>Wash vegetables and fruit before packing them and use cold packs or coolers to keep food and drinks cool.</li></ul><h2>Barbecues</h2> <p>Barbecuing is a fun and easy way to prepare, cook and eat as a family. It is a healthy cooking option, allowing for a variety of lean grilling choices.</p> <p>While many people associate barbecues with hamburgers and hot dogs, there are many more options to throw on the grill. Why not try chicken breasts, pork tenderloin, turkey breast, sirloin steak or vegetable kebabs? <a href="/Article?contentid=1965&language=English">Firm tofu</a> or fish can also work well on the grill. If you are grilling meat, trim the fat and use flavourful, homemade marinades to keep your choices lean, tender and delicious.</p> <h3>Tips for safe sizzling</h3> <ul> <li><a href="/article?contentid=1981&language=English">Wash hands</a> with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling food.</li> <li>Use separate serving dishes, cutting boards and utensils for raw and cooked meat. Use a clean plate when taking food off of the barbeque.</li> <li>Keep raw meat, poultry or seafood away from other foods.</li> <li>If barbecuing at home, wash counter tops and cooking utensils with hot soapy water to make sure that juices from raw meat do not contaminate other foods.</li> <li>Eat charred or blackened meat and fish only now and then.</li> <li>Marinate meat to reduce the number of potentially harmful compounds in blackened meat. If you use a sauce or marinade on raw meat, do not re-use the sauce with cooked meat.</li> <li>Cook ground meats fully to remove harmful bacteria. Colour is not a reliable sign that meat is safe to eat. Use a food thermometer to accurately check that the internal temperature is at least 71°C (160°F) for ground beef and at least 74°C (165°F) for ground chicken. Visit Health Canada for details of the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/eating-nutrition/safety-salubrite/cook-temperatures-cuisson-tbl-eng.php">safe internal cooking temperatures</a> for other meats.</li> <li>Supervise children well. Barbecues reach extremely high temperatures and pose a <a href="/article?contentid=1116&language=English">burn</a> risk. Ensure your children are at a safe distance away.</li> </ul> <h2>Picnics</h2> <p>A trip to the park — or even your back yard — can be a fun way to spend time as a family. But just as important as the blanket and sunscreen are the food and drink you will pack. Eating well gives you and your kids energy to enjoy an active afternoon together.</p> <p>Some people might be tempted by the convenience of packaged snacks such as crackers or chips when planning an outdoor meal. However, there are ways to include fun, easy and healthy options without resorting to a hamper of convenience foods.</p> <h3>Preparing and storing picnic meals</h3> <ul> <li>Balance treats or "sometimes foods", such as chips or cookies, with whole grains, vegetables and fruit, and lean protein choices. Try pita sandwiches filled with turkey and vegetables, a bean or whole wheat pasta salad, vegetables and dip, or cut-up fruit.</li> <li>Do not forget to bring water to keep everyone hydrated. It is easy to become <a href="/Article?contentid=776&language=english">dehydrated</a> in the summer and park water stations are not always working or readily available.</li> <li>Always wash your hands or use hand sanitizer before eating.</li> <li>Always wash vegetables and fruit before you pack them.</li> <li>Keep raw meat away from other food to prevent cross-contamination. Do not open raw meat packages more than you need to.</li> <li>Use ice or cold packs to keep food that goes bad cold.</li> <li>If using a cooler, fill it up — a full cooler stays colder than one that is partly filled. Keep the cooler out of direct sunlight and avoid opening it too often. Consider using one cooler for food and another for drinks. The food cooler will not be opened as often as the drink cooler, which means the food will stay colder for longer.</li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/safe_outdoor_meals.jpg Find tips for safe and tasty outdoor meals during the summer months to prepare for your next barbecue or picnic.Main