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COVID-19 vaccination for ages under fiveCOVID-19 vaccination for ages under fiveCOVID-19 vaccination for ages under fiveCEnglishInfectious DiseasesBaby (1-12 months);Preschooler (2-4 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2022-08-11T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the status of the COVID-19 vaccine for children under five years of age and the benefits of getting the vaccine for this age group.</p><h2>Is there a COVID-19 vaccine available for children under five years of age?</h2><p>Yes. On July 14, 2022, Health Canada authorized Moderna’s Spikevax for use as a two-dose primary series in children six months to five years of age, and a three-dose primary vaccine series in those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised. “Primary vaccine series” refers to the initial number of doses of a particular vaccine that a person needs. It does not include booster dose(s).</p><p>This is the first COVID-19 vaccine authorized in Canada for use in children under the age of five years.</p><p>Looking for general information on COVID-19 vaccines. Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a>.</p><p>Looking for information specific to children aged five to 11? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4001&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)</a>.</p><p>Looking for information specific to youth age 12+? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4000&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)</a>.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Health Canada has authorized Moderna’s Spikevax for use as a two-dose primary series in children six months to five years of age, and a three-dose primary vaccine series in those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised.</li><li>Vaccination is recommended ahead of the start of the school year and upcoming respiratory virus season.</li><li>Neonates are more at risk of hospital admission because they have an immature immune system that has difficulty combatting disease.</li><li>Infants under six months of age can receive protection through immunization of the parent during pregnancy and subsequently through breastfeeding (more information for this age group is available later in the article).</li> </ul> <h2>What do we know about the Moderna vaccine?</h2><p>Clinical trial findings show that Moderna’s vaccine, which is 25 micrograms (half the dose given to the age six to 11 group), produces an immune response in children under five equal to the immune response seen in young adults 18 to 25 years of age who receive the 100-microgram dose primary series. Preliminary efficacy of the vaccine in preventing symptomatic COVID-19 when Omicron is the dominant variant is estimated at 50.6 per cent in children six to 23 months of age and 36.8 per cent in children two to five years of age starting 14 days after the second dose.</p><p> <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/naci-summary-july-14-2022.pdf">More information is available in this summary document</a> from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization.</p><h2>What are the side effects of the vaccine?</h2><p>In the clinical trial, 4,792 children aged between six months to five years of age received the vaccine. Side effects were similar to those seen with other vaccines given at that age, including irritability or crying, pain at the injection site, sleepiness, and loss of appetite.</p><h2>Should I be concerned about myocarditis side effects in this age group?</h2><p>In the vaccine trial for children under 6 years of age, there were no reported incidents of myocarditis. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis have been seen extremely rarely in children aged five to 11 years of age, and thus the risk for younger children is anticipated to be low. There are multiple surveillance mechanisms in place in order to monitor any potential post-vaccination risk of these conditions over time in younger children.</p><h2>Is there another vaccine for this age group currently under review by Health Canada?</h2><p>Yes, a vaccine developed by Pfizer is currently under review by Health Canada and a decision is expected in the coming weeks to months.</p><h2>Should I wait for the Pfizer vaccine?</h2><p>If you have decided to vaccinate your child, the first vaccine that is available is the best option to provide protection as soon as possible.</p><h2>What is the risk to children under five years old from COVID-19?</h2><p>With the spread of the Omicron variant, there have been more cases of children under age five in hospital with COVID-19 than earlier in the pandemic.</p><p>Children who have had COVID-19 are at risk of experiencing multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), a rare but serious complication that usually requires hospitalization. Although children with an underlying medical condition are at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19, this can still occur in children who were previously healthy. Severe disease and MIS-C can occur in any child, whether they have an underlying condition or not.</p><p>Further, all Individuals can help protect vulnerable members of their family, including children and youth, by ensuring that they and everyone around them are vaccinated against COVID-19.</p><p>Read the full <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-moderna-spikevax-covid-19-vaccine-children-6-months-5-years.pdf">Advisory Committee Statement</a> from NACI for more information.</p><h2>Why vaccinate my child if COVID-19 has already infected most of my household members?</h2><p>Many people are getting COVID-19 more than once. Studies in adults, which bode well for children, show that vaccination following infection provides stronger and longer-lasting protection from COVID-19 than infection alone. In addition, vaccination may provide further protection ahead of the start of the school year and upcoming respiratory virus season.</p><h2>Can my child receive the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as another vaccine?</h2><p>Vaccinating children against a multitude of diseases is an important way to keep them healthy; however, for now, NACI recommends vaccination against COVID-19 either 14 days before or after a different vaccine. Please ensure your child remains <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1986&language=English">up to date with all their vaccinations</a>.</p><h2>If I’ve recently had a booster dose of the vaccine and am currently breastfeeding, is it safe for my baby to be vaccinated?</h2><p>Yes. The antibodies from breast milk do not interfere with the immunity acquired from the vaccine, which will provide additional protection. Breastfeeding is not a contra-indication to receiving vaccines in infants who can receive them. There is no need to delay or time the vaccination differently.</p><h2>If my child is five years old, should they get the Moderna vaccine approved for ages six months to five years, or the Pfizer vaccine approved for ages five to 11 years?</h2><p>For children aged five years and above, it’s recommended that they receive the Pfizer vaccine approved for the five to 11 age group. Children aged six months to under five are recommended to receive the Moderna vaccine for this age group for both doses of the primary series.</p> <h2>Infants less than 6 months of age</h2><h3>Is there a vaccine for infants under six months of age?</h3><p>No. A vaccine for this age group would require clinical studies to determine the safety and benefits of vaccination. However, babies can receive protection through immunization of the parent during pregnancy and subsequently through breastfeeding.</p><h3>How can I protect my unborn baby from COVID-19?</h3><p>Neonates are more at risk of hospital admission because they have an <a href="https://www.cheo.on.ca/en/news/pregnant-individuals-urged-to-get-vaccinated-amid-hospitalization-of-infants-with-covid-19.aspx">immature immune system that has difficulty combatting disease</a>. If you are pregnant, vaccination is the best way to protect your baby from COVID-19. Vaccination enables you to pass on immunity to your baby while also protecting yourself.</p><h3>Does this immunity offer protection after the baby is born?</h3><p>Yes, it is well-recognized in other infectious diseases, such as flu and whooping cough (pertussis), that antibodies resulting from vaccination in a pregnant person provide protection for the first six months of an infant’s life. Multiple studies, including this <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7107e3.htm">from the U.S. CDC</a>, have also shown that infants born to those who are vaccinated have more antibodies against COVID-19 and are less likely to be admitted to the hospital with COVID-19. If the pregnant person has not been vaccinated or infected, the baby does not have the protection of antibodies transferred from the parent during the third trimester of pregnancy.</p><h3>Are there any risks or benefits to being vaccinated if I am breastfeeding?</h3><p> <a href="https://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ijgo.14008">Studies have shown</a> that there are no risks from receiving a COVID-19 vaccine in individuals who are breastfeeding. Studies have also shown that vaccinated individuals who are breastfeeding pass along antibodies in their breast milk, which may confer additional protection against COVID-19 to their child.</p><h2>If I have additional questions, who can I speak with to get the answers?</h2><p>Make an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a> to have a one-on-one phone appointment with a SickKids expert.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1155773108.jpgMain
COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1278968456.jpg2022-09-06T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the status of the COVID-19 vaccine for children five to 11 years of age and the benefits of getting the vaccine for children.</p><h2>What is the status of COVID-19 vaccines for children in Canada?</h2><p>In November 2021, Health Canada approved the use of the Pfizer vaccine for children five to 11 years of age.</p><p>In March 2022, Health Canada approved the use of the Moderna vaccine in children six to 11 years of age.</p><p>In July 2022, Health Canada approved the use of the Moderna vaccine in children under age five.</p><p>Looking for general information on COVID-19 vaccines. Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a>.</p> <p>Looking for information specific to children under five years of age? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4054&language=English">COVID-19 vaccination for ages under five</a>.</p> <p>Looking for information specific to youth age 12+? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4000&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)</a>.</p> <br> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Vaccines against COVID-19 have been shown to be safe and effective.</li><li>The Pfizer vaccine was approved for use in children five to 11 years of age in November 2021 and the Moderna vaccine was approved for children six to 11 years of age in March 2021.</li><li>Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) advises that the Pfizer vaccine is preferred for this age group and that the Moderna vaccine may be offered as an alternative.</li><li>Children get a smaller dose of the vaccine. They will still need to get two doses.</li><li>Side effects in younger children are similar to those seen in adults and older children.</li></ul><h2>What evidence is there that the vaccine is safe and effective for children?</h2><p>Over 3,000 children aged five to 11 received the vaccine through the Pfizer clinical trial and no serious side effects have been detected in the ongoing study after many months of follow-up. The vaccine was shown to be 91 per cent effective against symptomatic COVID-19 with mild side effects like those seen in adults and older children. These side effects include arm tenderness, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, chills and fever, which can also be seen with other vaccines recommended for children. Rare side effects that have been seen in older teens and young adults are expected to be extremely rare in children. Read about the <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298">clinical trial results in the New England Journal of Medicine</a>.</p><p>In the Moderna trial in children aged six to 11, over 3,000 children received the vaccine and preliminary data did not report any safety concerns. Side effects included injection site pain, headaches, tiredness, fever and muscle pain. The study showed that children had similar immune responses to adults aged 18 to 25 years old after receiving the vaccine, and an estimated efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 of 88 per cent 14 days after the first dose. Read about the <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2203315">clinical trial results in the New England Journal of Medicine</a>.</p><h2>Why should children get vaccinated if they do not get sick from COVID-19?</h2><p>Although severe illness due to acute COVID-19 infection is less frequent in children compared to adults, children can still be hospitalized and even require ICU-level care due to COVID-19. Getting the vaccine can protect children from severe illness and hospitalization.</p><p>A proportion of children who contract COVID-19 may go on to develop multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). While treatable and rare, approximately one in three children hospitalized with MIS-C will require ICU care. A study in the U.S. conducted in 2021 showed that the vaccine was highly effective in preventing the development of this serious condition in vaccinated youth (aged 12 to 18). The study showed that among the youth who were hospitalized with MIS-C, the vast majority were unvaccinated. This data bodes well for the prevention of MIS-C in vaccinated children aged five to 11 for which confirmatory studies are underway.</p><p>While long COVID rates are expected to be lower in children compared with adults, the full spectrum of manifestations of long COVID in children is still being determined.</p><h2>How can anyone be sure a vaccine developed so quickly is also safe?</h2><p>Work on coronavirus vaccines has been ongoing for more than 10 years, due in part to the SARS-CoV-1 outbreak in 2003. It was important to develop the COVID-19 vaccine quickly because of how many people were dying and getting sick, and because of the disruptions to everyday life as a result of the pandemic. Even though the vaccines were developed quickly, all the usual steps for the approval of vaccines occurred, including clinical trials with the appropriate number of participants. Because of the worldwide collaboration and large amount of resources that were made available to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, as well as the large number of COVID-19 cases the clinical trials were able to happen quickly. This made it easier to tell quickly whether or not the vaccines worked to prevent cases of COVID-19. The vaccine was rapidly shown to be effective in protecting against COVID-19.</p><h2>Are recent cases of hepatitis in children related to the COVID-19 vaccine?</h2><p>Beginning in early April 2022, the World Health Organization has reported an increase of new hepatitis cases of unknown origin in children not caused by known hepatitis viruses, such as hepatitis A, B, C and E. Side effects from the COVID-19 vaccines are not suspected, as the vast majority of affected children were too young and did not receive COVID-19 vaccination.</p><h2>Do children under 12 years of age need one vaccination or two? Is a different vaccine dose used in younger children?</h2><p>Children aged five to 11 years receive a two-dose schedule of a smaller Pfizer vaccine dose than the one used in people 12 and older (10 µg instead of 30µg). The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends that the second dose should be given at least eight weeks after the first dose. Children who turn 12 years before their second dose may receive an adult dose.</p><p>Children aged six to 11 receive a smaller Moderna vaccine dose (50µg instead of 100µg), four to eight weeks apart.</p><h2>My child is turning 12 years old in 2022. Now that a vaccine is approved for children under 12 years of age, should I wait to vaccinate my child when they are 12 years old and eligible for the adult dose?</h2><p>The first COVID-19 vaccine that is available for your child will be the best vaccine to get, as it will provide protection against COVID-19 to your child as soon as possible. Vaccine doses are based on age and the maturity of the immune system. The clinical trials (and real-world date since) showed the paediatric dose given to children aged five to 11 (a third of the dose given to people aged 12 and up), was effective and also resulted in fewer side effects.</p><h2>What if my child’s weight is above average in their age group?</h2><p>Vaccine doses are based on age and the maturity of the immune system, not weight. The clinical trials (and real-world data since) showed the paediatric dose given to children aged five to 11 (a third of the dose given to people aged 12 and up), was effective and also resulted in fewer side effects.</p><h2>How are COVID-19 cases trending among children?</h2><p>The virus causing COVID-19 continues to circulate and can lead to hospitalization in all age groups, especially in people who are not vaccinated. Vaccination helps protect children from developing severe illness and hospitalization from COVID-19 and its complications. Further, children who develop COVID-19 can pass the virus on to other people, including vulnerable adults such as grandparents or immunocompromised individuals.</p><h2>Can vaccination improve the physical and mental health of children?</h2><p> <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/research-covid-19-pandemic-impact-child-youth-mental-physical-health/">SickKids-led research</a> has shown a serious, sustained negative impact on the mental health of Ontario children, youth and their families due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Before the pandemic, a study showed that about 60 per cent of participants engaged in school sports and/or other extracurricular activities. During the pandemic, only 27 per cent participated in sports and 16 per cent in extracurriculars. These activities are known to boost physical and mental health. Vaccination will help return children to their regular activities and thus help improve the mental health and psychosocial well-being of children.</p><h2>My child is afraid of needles. What can I do to help?</h2><p>Some children have a very strong reaction to needles. If your child is worried about getting a needle, you can ask for special ways to support their vaccination, such as a longer appointment time or a private space for the injection. The CARD system (Comfort, Ask, Relax, Distract) may also help. It provides groups of strategies to reduce the pain, stress and worries associated with vaccinations to make the experience a more positive one. More information can be found at <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card">AboutKidsHealth.ca/card</a>. For children worried about pain, there are numbing creams and patches available at many pharmacies to help minimize needle discomfort.</p><h2>What can I do for my child who is sensory-sensitive?</h2><p>Sensory-sensitive vaccination clinics use some of the CARD strategies listed above to offer a calmer environment for each child, giving them as much time as they need and their own room to get the vaccine. Some clinics also offer sensory-sensitive appointments, offering dimmed lights, less noise and a slower pace, as well as privacy.</p><h2>Can the COVID-19 vaccine affect puberty or fertility in children?</h2><p>There is no evidence and no scientific reason to believe that the COVID-19 vaccine can affect puberty and fertility in children. Clinical trials of those who have been vaccinated in the general population have shown that the vaccine is very safe.</p><h2>What are the vaccine’s side effects in children under 12?</h2><p>Side effects from the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine are comparable to side effects your child may have experienced after other childhood vaccinations. These may include feeling tired, chills, muscle aches and pains, and a sore or red arm. The majority of children had very mild side effects or none at all. Typically these side effects will go away after a few days and there are no long-term side effects reported.</p><h2>What about reports of vaccine side effects like myocarditis and pericarditis in younger people?</h2><p>Myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) and pericarditis (inflammation of the heart’s outer lining) are rare and mostly seen in older adolescents and young adults. Both are extremely rare in relation to the COVID-19 vaccine. There were no reports of myocarditis or pericarditis in the Pfizer clinical trial for children five to 11 years old. Millions of children in Canada, the U.S. and other countries have received the vaccine with very few reports of these conditions, which are generally mild and benign. Myocarditis and pericarditis actually occur far more often after COVID-19 infection than after being vaccinated against COVID-19. Myocarditis and pericarditis occurring after COVID-19 vaccination is a generally mild and benign condition. There are multiple surveillance mechanisms in place in order to monitor any potential post-vaccination risk of these conditions over time.</p><p>The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends that the Pfizer vaccine should be preferred over the Moderna vaccine for children aged five to 11. Although the risk of myocarditis or pericarditis with the Moderna in children 6 to 11 years of age is currently unknown, the risk was found to be higher in older individuals than with the Pfizer vaccine.</p><p>Additional information about <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/pharmacy/sites/ca.pharmacy/files/uploads/files/myocarditis_and_pericarditis_after_covid-19_vaccines.pdf">myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID-19 vaccination</a> is available in this article from the University of Waterloo.</p><h2>Is vaccination safe for children with food allergies?</h2><p>Yes. There is no reason a child with a food allergy of any kind should not be vaccinated. Children with a history of allergy to foods, oral drugs, insect venom or environmental allergies can receive COVID-19 vaccines without any special precautions. If you are concerned about the possibility of an allergic reaction to any of the <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines/pfizer-biontech.html#a4">vaccine ingredients</a>, please consult your child’s primary health-care provider.</p><h2>Does the vaccine work against the Omicron variant?</h2><p>The Omicron variant is known to be much more transmissible than previous strains of COVID-19, but vaccination still protects against serious illness and hospitalization. The more people who are vaccinated against COVID-19, the more we can protect ourselves and prevent new variants from emerging and spreading in the community.</p><h2>Is the Omicron variant of COVID-19 causing more severe illness than previous strains?</h2><p>Most children and youth who have COVID-19 experience mild illness and do not require hospitalization. Those who are hospitalized typically require support for fever, dehydration and breathing difficulties. The increase in hospitalizations of COVID-positive patients is likely the result of widespread community transmission of COVID-19 due to the Omicron variant. While rare, some children and youth can get seriously ill after contracting COVID-19 and this is something we are monitoring closely.</p><h2>How effective is one dose of the vaccine against COVID-19?</h2><p>The COVID-19 vaccine is currently a two-dose primary series for children aged five to 11. While one dose provides partial protection in young individuals, it takes both doses to be considered fully vaccinated and optimize the protection provided by vaccination.</p><h2>Are children aged five to 11 eligible for a booster dose of the vaccine?</h2><p>Yes. In August 2022, Health Canada authorized a booster dose of the Pfizer vaccine, to be administered at least six months after the second dose, for all children in this age group.</p> <h2>Does the rapid spread of the Omicron variant mean children should receive their two vaccine doses at an interval shorter than the eight weeks recommended when it was approved in Canada?</h2><p>The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) currently recommends an eight-week interval, but parents may choose to vaccinate their children at a shorter interval (minimum 21 days) if they provide informed consent. If you are considering vaccinating your child at a shorter interval because of an underlying health condition or other reason, please discuss the matter with your child’s primary health-care provider. See <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/updated-recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-children-5-11-years-age.pdf">NACI’s updated recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines in children 5 to 11 years of age</a>.</p><h2>Is there advice you would give to families with children who are immunocompromised or have disabilities and medical complexity?</h2><p>Vaccination remains the best layer of protection against COVID-19 for everyone. It is important your child receives the vaccinations for which they are eligible. In Ontario, certain immunocompromised populations, including children aged five to 11, are eligible for a primary series of three doses. Read more about <a href="https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/coronavirus/docs/vaccine/COVID-19_vaccine_third_dose_recommendations.pdf">Ontario’s third-dose recommendations</a>. You can also talk to your child’s doctor or book an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a>.</p><h2>What is the current evidence for vaccination for COVID-19 in children with disabilities and medical complexity?</h2><p>Current evidence suggests that children with disabilities and medical complexity may be at an increased risk for severe illness or complications from COVID-19 based on their underlying condition making vaccination and prevention of COVID-19 especially important. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective for children with a wide variety of different medical conditions and complexities. Unexpected or severe side effects to the vaccine are very rare. If you have specific questions about your child’s medical condition and the COVID-19 vaccine, talk with your child’s doctor or book an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a>.</p><h2>What special considerations are there when vaccinating children with disabilities and medical complexity? Where can family caregivers find additional resources?</h2><p>Families should consider different strategies that have worked well with previous immunizations and create a plan to set their child up for success. Some questions to consider when scheduling your child’s vaccination appointment include:</p><ul><li>Does my child require a calmer environment? (i.e., privacy, quiet)</li><li>If applicable, is the vaccination clinic wheelchair accessible?</li><li>Which distraction techniques are typically most effective for my child (i.e., deep breathing, counting, watching a favourite video, stress balls)</li><li>What position will be most comfortable for my child during their vaccination (i.e., comfort holding, sitting with a caregiver, lying down)</li></ul><p>If family caregivers have questions related to vaccinating children with disabilities and medical complexity, you should first reach out to your child’s primary care physician. For additional questions after speaking with your child’s physician, you can book an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a>.</p><h2>Why do immunocompromised children benefit from additional vaccine doses?</h2><p>Similar to adults and with any other vaccine, the immune response to COVID-19 vaccines in children who are immunocompromised is not as strong as in people who are not immunocompromised. Therefore, they require additional vaccine doses to achieve appropriate protection. As immunocompromised people are at higher risk of complications and severe outcomes when infected with COVID-19, they are eligible for a higher number of doses and are strongly recommended to receive them all to maximize protection from COVID-19.</p><h2>Due to an underlying health condition, my child is at increased risk from side effects following any treatment or vaccination. What options are available to address this specific concern for my child?</h2><p>If you have specific concerns of this nature, it’s always best to speak with your primary health-care provider. Another option is to make an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a> to speak with a SickKids nurse. Additionally, if your child requires additional support or specialized care when receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, please email vaccine.consults@sickkids.ca and include the following information in your message: </p><ul><li>Name</li><li>Date of birth</li><li>Telephone number</li><li>Describe the considerations or accommodations that need to be in place for the patient</li></ul><h2>Should I be concerned that if my child takes an mRNA vaccine it could impact their eligibility for future specialized treatments for their condition?</h2><p>No. The vaccine will have no impact on future specialized treatments.<br></p><h2>I cannot decide if vaccinating my child is the right thing to do. Who can I talk to?</h2><p>Contact your child’s primary care provider or the SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service, a by-appointment phone service for Ontario residents that provides a safe, judgment-free space to have an open conversation about the COVID-19 vaccine with a paediatric registered nurse. Book an appointment online at <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult/">sickkids.ca/vaccineconsult</a> or by calling 1-888-304-6558.</p><p>For general information on COVID-19, please visit the <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/covid-19">COVID-19 learning hub</a>.</p><h2>Information on how to prepare and support your child with their COVID-19 vaccine</h2><p>CARD System Learning Hub<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain in children aged 18 months or over<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with comfort positions and distraction<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with numbing cream<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English</a></p><p>Pain relief: Comfort kit<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, February 26). COVID-19 Vaccination. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, March 8). Science Brief: Background Rationale and Evidence for Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html</a></p><p>Government of Ontario – Ministry of Health. (2020, March 31). COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario. Retrieved from <a href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario</a></p><p>Health Canada. (2021, October 18). Health Canada receives submission from Pfizer-BioNTech to authorize the use of Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine in children 5 to 11 years of age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html</a></p><p>ImmunizeBC. (2021, March 12). COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions">https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions</a></p><p>ImmunizeCanada. (2021, February 18). COVID-19 Info. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info">https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info</a></p><p>National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021, May 5). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 20). Pfizer and BioNTech Announce Positive Topline Results from Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 28). Pfizer and BioNTech Submit Initial Data to U.S. FDA From Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to <12 Years of Age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota</a>l</p><p>Public Health Agency of Canada. (2021, September 28). Advisory Committee Statement (ACS) National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI): Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Walter, E.B., Talaat, K.R., Sabharwal, C., Gurtman, A., Lockhart, S., Paulsen, G.C.,…Gruber, W.C., for the C4591007 Clinical Trial Group. (2021). Evaluation of the BNT162b2 Covid-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years of Age. <em>New England Journal of Medicine</em>. <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298">https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2021, February 19). COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines</a><br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1278968456.jpgCOVID-19 vaccine info for children (ages 5 to 11)Main
COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)CEnglishInfectious DiseasesTeen (13-18 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANADrug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1302135365.jpg2022-07-28T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the status of COVID-19 vaccines for youth 12 to 17 years of age and the benefits of getting the vaccine for youth.<br></p><h2>What is the status of COVID-19 vaccines for youth in Canada?</h2><p>In May 2021, Health Canada approved the use of the Pfizer vaccine for all individuals older than 12 years of age.</p><p>Here are a few helpful resources about COVID-19 vaccines and youth.</p><ul><li> <a href="https://kidshealthfirst.ca/">COVID-19 Vaccines for Ontario Youth</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.toronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/97d6-COVID-19-Vaccine-Fact-Sheet-Youth.pdf">COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet for Youth Age 12 to 17</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.toronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/908c-CovidTeenVaxConsentInfographF.pdf">Does my 12+ Child Require Informed Consent to Receive Their Vaccine?</a></li></ul><p>Looking for general information on COVID-19 vaccines. Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a>.</p><p>Looking for information specific to children under five years of age? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4054&language=English">COVID-19 vaccination for ages under five</a>.</p> <p>Looking for information specific to children aged five to 11? Visit the page on <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4001&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)</a>.</p> <br> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Vaccines against COVID-19 have been shown to be safe and effective against the disease.</li><li>Two of the vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, are approved for people 12 years of age and older.</li><li>The vaccine has been shown to prevent severe illness and hospitalization in youth aged 12 to 17.</li><li>Vaccinating youth aged 12 to 17 will help to prevent the transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.</li></ul><h2>Do you recommend that youth get the vaccine against COVID-19?</h2><p>Although they are less at risk than older people, some youth may still develop severe COVID-19, or may require hospitalization because of COVID-19. The vaccine has been shown to prevent severe illness and hospitalization in youth. Moreover, vaccinating youth will become important to reduce the transmission of the virus since they represent a large proportion of the population.</p><h2>Why do youth need the COVID-19 vaccine since they don’t get that sick if they become infected?</h2><p>While adults are at higher risk of complications from COVID-19, youth can still get infected and develop severe complications. Vaccination against COVID-19 prevents youth from being infected and may also prevent them from developing severe and long-term complications. Vaccination can also prevent youth from transmitting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.</p><h2>Can vaccination help prevent the occurrence of MIS-C?</h2><p>Multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) is a hyperinflammatory condition that is observed in some children and youth following COVID-19 infection. A study in the U.S. conducted in 2021 showed that the vaccine was highly effective at preventing the development of this serious condition in vaccinated youth (aged 12 to 18). The study showed that among the youth who were hospitalized with MIS-C, the vast majority were unvaccinated.</p><h2>Can vaccination improve the physical and mental health of youth?</h2><p>Getting vaccinated can help keep youth safe and healthy, return to their pre-pandemic activities, as well as limit the spread of COVID-19 to others in the community.</p><p> <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/research-covid-19-pandemic-impact-child-youth-mental-physical-health/">SickKids-led research</a> has shown a serious, sustained negative impact on the mental health of Ontario children, youth and their families due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Before the pandemic, a study showed that 58 per cent of participants engaged in school sports and/or other extracurricular activities. During the pandemic, only 27 per cent participated in sports and 16 per cent in extracurriculars. These activities are known to boost physical and mental health. Vaccination will help return children to their regular activities and thus help improve the mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of children.</p><h2>Is the risk of myocarditis or pericarditis greater from the vaccine or from COVID-19 for youth?</h2><p>In Canada, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends vaccination for youth and young adults who are eligible, as the benefits of vaccination to prevent COVID-19 and associated complications outweigh very rare cases of myocarditis/pericarditis following COVID-19 mRNA vaccination.</p><p>Additional information about <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/pharmacy/sites/ca.pharmacy/files/uploads/files/myocarditis_and_pericarditis_after_covid-19_vaccines.pdf">myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID-19 vaccination</a> is available in this article from the University of Waterloo.</p><p>A recent U.S. study found myocarditis rates with confirmed COVID-19 infection to be as high as 450 cases per million infections in young males aged 12 to 17 years, which is a much higher rate than from vaccination.</p><h2>Can the COVID-19 vaccine affect puberty and fertility in youth?</h2><p>No. There is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine can affect puberty and fertility in youth. Ongoing studies and surveillance of those who have been vaccinated in the general population have shown that the mRNA vaccines are very safe in youth aged 12 to 17.</p><p>For general information on COVID-19, please visit the <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/covid-19">COVID-19 learning hub</a>.</p><h2>Is vaccination safe for youth with food allergies?</h2><p>Yes. There is no reason a youth with a food allergy of any kind should not be vaccinated. Children with a history of allergy to foods, oral drugs, insect venom or environmental allergies can receive COVID-19 vaccines without any special precautions. If you are concerned about the possibility of an allergic reaction to any of the <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines/pfizer-biontech.html#a4">vaccine ingredients</a>, please consult your child’s primary health-care provider.</p><h2>Does the vaccine work against the Omicron variant?</h2><p>The Omicron variant is known to be much more transmissible than previous strains of COVID-19, but vaccination still protects against serious illness and hospitalization. The more people who are vaccinated against COVID-19, the more we can protect ourselves and prevent new variants from emerging and spreading in the community.</p><h2>Is the Omicron variant of COVID-19 causing more severe illness than previous strains?</h2><p>Studies are ongoing with respect to the severity of COVID-19 in children and youth due to the Omicron variant. However, most children and youth who have COVID-19 experience mild illness and do not require hospitalization. Those who are hospitalized typically require support for fever, dehydration and breathing difficulties. The increase in hospitalizations of COVID-positive patients is likely the result of widespread community transmission of COVID-19 due to the Omicron variant. While rare, some children and youth can get seriously ill after contracting COVID-19 and this is something we are monitoring closely.</p><h2>When will youth be eligible for a third (booster) dose of the vaccine?</h2><p>In Ontario, youth (ages 12 to 17) are eligible for a third (booster) dose as of February 18, 2022 as long as six months (168 days) have passed since their second dose.</p><h2>Can youth who are immunocompromised receive their fourth (booster) dose yet?</h2><p>Yes, anyone who meets the <a href="https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/coronavirus/docs/vaccine/COVID-19_vaccine_third_dose_recommendations.pdf">Ontario Ministry of Health criteria</a> for being moderately to severely immunocompromised, including youth aged 12 to 17, are eligible for a three-dose primary series and a fourth dose (booster) six months (168 days) after they complete a three-dose primary series.</p><h2>Why do immunocompromised youth benefit from additional vaccine doses?</h2><p>Similar to adults and with any other vaccine, the immune response to COVID-19 vaccines in youth who are immunocompromised is not as strong as in people who are not immunocompromised. Therefore, they require additional vaccine doses to achieve appropriate protection. As immunocompromised people are at higher risk of complications and severe outcomes when infected with COVID-19, they are eligible for a higher number of doses and are strongly recommended to receive them all to maximize protection from COVID-19.</p><h2>Due to an underlying health condition, my child is at increased risk from side effects following any treatment or vaccination. What options are available to address this specific concern for my child?</h2><p>If you have specific concerns of this nature, it’s always best to speak with your primary health-care provider. Another option is to make an appointment with the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/support-services/covid-19-vaccine-consult">SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service</a> to speak with a SickKids nurse. Additionally, if your child requires additional support or specialized care when receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, please email vaccine.consults@sickkids.ca and include the following information in your message: </p><ul><li>Name</li><li>Date of birth</li><li>Telephone number</li><li>Describe the considerations or accommodations that need to be in place for the patient</li></ul><h2>Should I be concerned that if my child takes an mRNA vaccine it could impact their eligibility for future specialized treatments for their condition?</h2><p>No. The vaccine will have no impact on future specialized treatments.</p><h2>Information on how to prepare and support your child with their COVID-19 vaccine</h2><p>CARD System Learning Hub<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/card</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain in children aged 18 months or over<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with comfort positions and distraction<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3629&language=English</a></p><p>Needle pokes: Reducing pain with numbing cream<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3627&language=English</a></p><p>Pain relief: Comfort kit<br><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1258&language=English</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, February 26). COVID-19 Vaccination. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/index.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, March 8). Science Brief: Background Rationale and Evidence for Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/fully-vaccinated-people.html</a></p><p>Government of Ontario – Ministry of Health. (2020, March 31). COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario. Retrieved from <a href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario</a></p><p>Health Canada. (2021, October 18). Health Canada receives submission from Pfizer-BioNTech to authorize the use of Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine in children 5 to 11 years of age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2021/10/health-canada-receives-submission-from-pfizer-biontech-to-authorize-the-use-of-comirnaty-covid-19-vaccine-in-children-5-to-11-years-of-age.html</a></p><p>ImmunizeBC. (2021, March 12). COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions">https://immunizebc.ca/covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions</a></p><p>ImmunizeCanada. (2021, February 18). COVID-19 Info. Retrieved from <a href="https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info">https://immunize.ca/covid-19-info</a></p><p>National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021, May 5). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 20). Pfizer and BioNTech Announce Positive Topline Results from Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-announce-positive-topline-results</a></p><p>Pfizer. (2021, September 28). Pfizer and BioNTech Submit Initial Data to U.S. FDA From Pivotal Trial of COVID-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to <12 Years of Age. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota">https://www.pfizer.com/news/press-release/press-release-detail/pfizer-and-biontech-submit-initial-data-us-fda-pivota</a>l</p><p>Public Health Agency of Canada. (2021, September 28). Advisory Committee Statement (ACS) National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI): Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf">https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf</a></p><p>Walter, E.B., Talaat, K.R., Sabharwal, C., Gurtman, A., Lockhart, S., Paulsen, G.C.,…Gruber, W.C., for the C4591007 Clinical Trial Group. (2021). Evaluation of the BNT162b2 Covid-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years of Age. <em>New England Journal of Medicine</em>. <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298">https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2116298</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2021, February 19). COVID-19 vaccines. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1302135365.jpgCOVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)Main
COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4054&language=English&hub=COVID-19"><figure class="asset-small"><img alt="Read COVID-19 vaccine information for children under five years of age" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID_Vaccine_info_under_five_thumbnail.jpg" /> </figure> </a> <p>This learning hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you and your child cope. Find general information on COVID-19 and articles and resources about vaccines and testing. Read the article to find more information about COVID-19 vaccines for children under five years of age.<br></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLfAK35c0XomtY0ixQrG3EjdwiCw8vOCUw"></iframe> </div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3907&language=English">Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3875&language=English">COVID-19 and chronic pain in children and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 vaccines</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about the COVID-19 vaccines that are available in Canada and about their safety and effectiveness.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3937&language=English">COVID-19 vaccines general information</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4054&language=English">COVID-19 vaccination for ages under five</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4001&language=English">COVID-19 vaccine information for children (ages five to 11)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4000&language=English">COVID-19 vaccine information for youth (ages 12+)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://iphcc.ca/covid-19/">COVID-19 (Indigenous Primary Health Care Council)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfAK35c0XomtY0ixQrG3EjdwiCw8vOCUw">SickKids COVID-19 vaccine consult service: Commonly asked questions (video playlist)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJ4tKxYISRk">Youth COVID-19 vaccination: What to expect (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/CARD_Vaccination_Handout.pdf">CARD handout: Coping with pain and fear around vaccination for teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/CARD_Vaccination_Poster.pdf">CARD poster: Coping with pain and fear around vaccination for teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines.html">Vaccines for COVID-19: Authorized vaccines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 testing</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information that will help you and your child prepare or either a saliva test or a nasopharyngeal swab.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/">Take this self-assessment if you were exposed to COVID-19 or have symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-test-and-testing-location-information">Ontario COVID-19 test and testing location information</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19%20Testing%20How%20to%20prepare%20and%20comfort%20your%20child.pdf">COVID-19 Testing: How to prepare and comfort your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ru-vFZdImes">Saliva testing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3908&language=English">After your child’s COVID-19 test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge (video)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://cmho.org/talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19/">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from and socialization with family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3882&language=English">COVID-19: Frequently asked questions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3888&language=English">Stressed adults and anxious young children: Supporting infants, toddlers and preschoolers through COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jwwwF9KQ7CQ">Parenting during COVID-19 and beyond (podcast)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3935&language=English">Keeping your child active during the COVID-19 pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/updated-covid19-school-operation-guidance-document-released/">SickKids - Updated guidance for school operation during the pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/sites/default/files/2020-07/HB-BackToSchool-Recommendations.pdf">Return to school recommendations for children with special needs (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1903&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1881&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=721&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=649&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3894&language=English">Supporting healthy and responsible screen use during COVID-19</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find helpful resources including handouts, videos and other resources about COVID-19.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqeyRuvF9WU">Your virtual video visit overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3889&language=English">Virtual care at SickKids</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3910&language=English">Virtual care: How to accurately measure your child’s height and weight at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUqAzahUMBvvRg2bbViWhH7"></iframe> </div><p>See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a></p> <br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19COVID-19 learning hub Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.Main

 

 

GI tractGI tractGI tractGEnglishNutritionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)AbdomenDigestive systemHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+) Educators Hospital healthcare providers Community healthcare providers Remote populations First nationsNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/J4K_belly_Bonanza_promo.png2013-09-27T04:00:00Z7.3000000000000066.0000000000000813.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn how the different parts of the GI tract work together to digest food.</p><figure><span class="asset-image-title">GI tract</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_digestive_system_V3_EN.jpg" alt="Salivary glands, esophagus, stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, small and large intestines, and anus" /> </figure> <p>When you eat, your body turns the food into energy and extracts vitamins, minerals and other nutrients to help it work properly. This process is called digestion. The parts of the body that are involved in digestion are called the digestive system.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>The digestive system includes the GI tract and the accessory organs of the liver, gall bladder and pancreas.</li> <li>The GI tract is divided into the upper GI tract, which runs from the mouth to the stomach, and the lower GI tract, which includes the small and large intestines.</li> <li>Together, the GI tract and accessory organs use mechanical digestion and chemical digestion to break down food.</li></ul><p>The central part of the digestive system is a winding muscular tube called the GI (gastrointestinal) tract. </p><p>Other parts of the digestive system, called <a href="/Article?contentid=1468&language=English">accessory organs</a>, help the GI tract to digest food. They include the:</p><ul><li>liver</li><li>gall bladder</li><li>pancreas.</li></ul><p>The GI tract, or digestive tract, has two main parts:</p><ul><li> the upper digestive tract</li><li> the intestines.</li></ul><h2>Upper digestive tract</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Upper digestive tract</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_digestive_system_upper_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the salivary glands, pharynx, esophagus and stomach in the upper digestive tract" /> </figure> <p>The upper digestive tract includes the mouth, the esophagus and the stomach.<br></p><h3>Mouth</h3><p>The mouth is where digestion begins. Even before we eat, the sights and smells of food trigger salivary glands in our cheeks and jaw to release saliva.</p><p>Saliva has two roles when we eat.</p><ul><li>It contains digestive juices called enzymes to break down the starch in food.</li><li>It helps to form the food into a compact "glob" called a bolus in our mouth. This makes the food easier to swallow.</li></ul><h3>Esophagus</h3><p>When food leaves the mouth, it passes through the pharynx into the esophagus. The esophagus is the muscular tube that gradually pushes food down to the stomach. It does this through waves of contractions known as peristalsis.</p><p>The wall of the esophagus releases a thick, sticky liquid called mucus. This mucus helps the body absorb the food you eat. It also lubricates the esophagus so food moves easily to the stomach.</p><h3>Stomach</h3><p>The stomach is a bean-shaped, hollow muscular organ that contains digestive acids. These acids help to break down food some more and turn it into liquid. The walls of the stomach are thick and elastic.</p><p>The size of the stomach depends on a person's size and body type and how much and how recently they have eaten.</p><p>The upper part of the stomach mainly stores food and relaxes to allow food to enter from the esophagus. In the lower part of the stomach, food is broken down through mechanical and chemical digestion.</p><ul><li>Mechanical digestion means that the stomach mixes, churns and pummels food using its muscles. This turns the food into a thick liquid paste called chyme.</li><li>Chemical digestion uses gastric juice to break down the protein in food. This gastric juice is a mix of chemicals and water and is very acidic.</li></ul><p>These processes account for part of digestion. The rest of digestion happens in the intestines.</p><h2>Intestines</h2><h3>Small intestine</h3><p>Food first passes into the small intestine. This long, hollow tube breaks down food through mechanical and chemical digestion and allows the food to pass into your blood.</p><p>The small intestine gets its name only because it is narrow. In fact, in an average adult, it measures about 22 feet (seven metres)!</p><p>The small intestine has three parts.</p><ul><li>The duodenum is where most of the remaining chemical digestion takes place. Chemicals and digestive juices from the <a href="/Article?contentid=1468&language=English">liver, gall bladder and pancreas</a> help in this process.</li><li>The jejunum is where <a href="/Article?contentid=1443&language=English">carbohydrates</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=1439&language=English">proteins</a> pass into the blood.</li><li>The ileum is where <a href="/Article?contentid=1446&language=English">vitamin B12</a> and bile salts pass into the blood.</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Parts of the small intestine</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_intestine_small_parts_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum in the small intestine" /> </figure> <p>By this time, food has been broken down into its smallest, most basic units and is ready to be absorbed. The small intestine has a large surface area for this function due to its special folds and tiny, finger-like projections, called villi.</p><p>Once food passes through the walls of the small intestine, it separates. Carbohydrates, proteins and some fats go to the liver to be processed. The remaining fats go into the blood.</p><h3>Large intestine</h3><p>The large intestine is sometimes called the colon. In adults, it is about five feet (1.5 metres) long.</p><p>Its role in digestion is to absorb the water from any leftover undigested food. It is also home to <a href="/Article?contentid=1469&language=English">gut flora</a>, which help us digest food and protect us from infections.</p><p>Three bands of muscle on the surface of the large intestine move waste products along by waves of contractions called mass movements. When there is enough waste material in the colon, further contractions push the feces (poo) into the rectum before it is released through the anus.</p><h2>Just for Kids</h2><p>Your child can learn about digestion by checking out the <a href="https://kids.aboutkidshealth.ca/player?title=belly-bonanza">Belly Bonanza</a> cartoon in our Just for Kids section.<br></p> <a class="sponsor-img-link" href="https://kids.aboutkidshealth.ca/player?title=belly-bonanza"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/INM_NRC_track6-2_J4K_bellyBonanza.png" alt="Belly Bonanza cartoon" /></a>Belly bonanza ​Follow the adventures of Blueberry and Green Pea to help your child learn how food travels through their digestive system. Mainhttps://kids.aboutkidshealth.ca/player?title=belly-bonanza
Mental healthMental healthMental healthMEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NALanding Page (Overview)Learning Hub<p>Learn how to support your mental health and well-being and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions, with multimedia resources including articles, animations and guided meditations.<br></p><p>Learn how to support your mental health and well-being and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions, with multimedia resources including articles, animations and guided meditations.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/teen_mentalhealth1.jpgmentalhealthmentalhealthTeen mental health Learn how to support your teen's mental health and wellbeing, and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions.Teens
Down syndromeDown syndromeDown syndromeDEnglishGeneticsChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyNAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-10-16T04:00:00Z10.900000000000044.80000000000001418.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>An easy-to-understand overview of the symptoms, complications and outlook for children with Down syndrome.</p><h2>What is Down syndrome? </h2><p>Down syndrome is a common congenital condition affecting about one in every 700 babies in Canada. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. Down syndrome is due to a genetic variation and is not related to race, nationality, religion or socio-economic status. </p><p>While Down syndrome is associated with medical and developmental challenges, the features of the condition vary widely from one child to another. The presentation of the syndrome falls on a spectrum.</p><p>Children with Down syndrome attend school and participate in recreational activities just like other children. Many adults with Down syndrome hold jobs, live independently and contribute to their family, friends and community in many different and meaningful ways.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Down syndrome is a genetic condition present at birth, and is due to the presence of extra genetic material from chromosome 21.</li><li>Down syndrome is a complex condition that affects the child’s health and development. </li><li>Children with Down syndrome can experience varying degrees of medical and developmental problems.</li><li>Individuals with Down syndrome benefit from loving homes, early intervention, inclusive and accommodating education and being connected to appropriate community resources throughout their lives. </li></ul><h2>What causes Down syndrome?</h2><p>Down syndrome is a genetic condition caused by having “extra” genetic material (or too many genes), of chromosome 21.</p><h3>Trisomy 21</h3><p>Each cell typically has 23 pairs of chromosomes for a total of 46 chromosomes. In children with Down syndrome, each cell in the body has 47 chromosomes because there is a third copy of chromosome 21. This is called trisomy 21, and affects approximately 94% of people with Down syndrome. This is most often a random genetic event and not caused by anything that either parent has done. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Trisomy 21 Down syndrome</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/down_syndrome_trisomy_21_EN.jpg" alt="Cells containing 23 pairs of chromosomes, with an extra chromosome 21" /> </figure> <h3>Other causes of Down syndrome</h3><p>In a small number of Down syndrome cases, the extra chromosome 21 is the result of an unbalanced translocation. Translocation occurs when chromosome 21 attaches itself to another chromosome in the cell so a child has three copies of chromosome 21. Translocation Down syndrome can be inherited from an unaffected parent.</p><p>More information about Translocation Down Syndrome can be found here: <a href="https://www.massgeneral.org/children/down-syndrome/translocation-down-syndrome.aspx/">http://www.massgeneral.org/children/down-syndrome/translocation-down-syndrome.aspx</a>. </p><p>The least common type of Down syndrome is called mosaicism. It affects about 1% of patients with Down syndrome. In this situation only some of the cells in the body have an extra copy of chromosome 21. </p><p>More information about mosaicism can be found here: <a href="https://www.massgeneral.org/children/down-syndrome/mosaic-down-syndrome.aspx">http://www.massgeneral.org/children/down-syndrome/mosaic-down-syndrome.aspx</a>.<br></p><h2>What are the chances of having a baby with Down syndrome?</h2><p>Women older than 35 years of age are at a greater risk to give birth to a child with Down syndrome, in comparison to women younger than 35. This risk increases with the mother’s age. However, because most babies in general are born to women who are younger than 35, most babies with Down syndrome (80%) are born to women younger than 35 years old.</p><p>The risk is also greater for parents who already have a child with Down syndrome, or for mothers or fathers who have a balanced translocation.</p><p>If you think you may be at risk, talk to your health-care professional.</p><h2>Diagnosis of Down syndrome</h2><p>Most babies born with Down syndrome are diagnosed with the condition after birth. However, there are several ways to test for Down syndrome before a baby is born. These include various blood tests along with an early fetal ultrasound to determine the chances that a baby might have trisomy 21. </p><p>These tests are sometimes referred to as integrated prenatal screening or first trimester screening. In recent years, non-invasive prenatal testing has been used. This is a very accurate blood test that helps determine if a fetus will have trisomy 21. </p><p>Other types of tests used to detect trisomy 21 in a fetus include <a href="/article?contentid=342&language=English">chronic villus sampling and amniocentesis</a>. </p><p>Although these tests may detect trisomy 21 before a baby is born, they are not able to predict how affected the child will be with regards to their development or medical issues. </p><p>Expectant parents should speak to their health-care providers for more information on diagnostic tests and procedures. A genetics counsellor can also provide more information, either prenatally or after delivery. </p><h2>Treatment of Down syndrome </h2><p>There is no cure for Down syndrome. However, there are many supportive treatments available to help target the associated medical and developmental challenges. Because children with Down syndrome can be affected differently, there are no standard medications required by all children with Down syndrome.</p><p>Medical problems for a child with Down syndrome often change with age. Your child’s doctor should be aware of these age-specific medical problems and organize the appropriate testing according to your child’s age. Health supervision guidelines for families are available online from the American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) at the following link: <a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/developmental-disabilities/Documents/Health_Care_Information_for_Families_of_Children_with_Down_Syndrome.pdf">https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/developmental-disabilities/Documents/Health_Care_Information_for_Families_of_Children_with_Down_Syndrome.pdf​</a></p><p>These guidelines highlight the common medical and developmental issues that should be monitored on a regular basis as well as the recommended tests that should be done on a yearly basis.</p><p>The full <a href="https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/128/2/393.full.pdf">AAP guidelines for professionals are also available​</a>. </p> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/down_syndrome_2nd.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Children with Down syndrome benefit from loving homes, early intervention, inclusive and accommodating education, appropriate medical care and positive public attitudes. An example of a typical program for a child with Down syndrome would include:</p><ul><li>Early intervention services</li><li>Physiotherapy for gross motor skills<br></li><li>Occupational therapy for feeding, general development and fine motor skills</li><li>Speech and language therapy to work on communication skill</li><li>Collaboration between your child’s health-care professionals and daycares, schools, and other extra-curricular programs, to optimize your child’s care.</li></ul><p>In adulthood, many people with Down syndrome hold jobs, live independently and enjoy recreational opportunities in their communities.</p><h2>How does Down syndrome affect the body?</h2><p>Babies with Down syndrome are more likely to be born prematurely. Their birth weight and length may be below average. Babies with Down syndrome are also more likely to have low muscle tone leading to floppiness (hypotonia). </p><p>In addition, there are several physical features that when taken all together are more often seen in children with Down syndrome. These features include: upward slanting eyes, flattened bridge of the nose, prominent tongue and low set ears. </p><p>Although children with Down syndrome share some common physical characteristics, they do not all look the same. A child with Down syndrome will look more like their parents, or other family members, than other children with the syndrome. </p><p>Children with Down syndrome also vary in personality and ability just like other children. They will all have intellectual impairment, delayed motor development, and speech problems. However, the level of impairment will be different for each individual. A child with Down syndrome may learn new skills slower than a child without Down syndrome. However, most children with Down syndrome should still be able to learn the same skills as other children, including walking, talking and being toilet trained. </p><p>There are several medical conditions that can affect children with Down syndrome. The most common medical conditions are hearing (75%) and vision problems (60%). About 40-50% of children with Down syndrome have heart defects. A smaller number of children (8-12%) have problems with their gastrointestinal tract at birth. </p><p>Children with Down syndrome are more likely to have certain infections, respiratory, blood and dental problems as well as thyroid and other medical conditions.</p><p>The effects of these conditions vary from child to child. They may be more serious in some children than in others. <strong>Some children with Down syndrome may have none of these medical conditions, while others will have several.</strong> With proper medical care most children and adults with Down syndrome can lead healthy lives. </p><p>The average life expectancy of individuals with Down syndrome is 60 years. Many people with Down syndrome will live into their sixties and seventies. In addition to some of the conditions mentioned above, adults with Down syndrome are more likely to have Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer's is a neurologic disease that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior.</p><p>For more information please see <a href="/article?contentid=2533&language=English">Down syndrome: Related conditions</a>.</p><p>If you have any questions or concerns about any of these conditions, speak with your child’s doctor.</p><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p>Babies and children with Down syndrome should be followed by a primary-care doctor. Your child’s primary-care doctor will care for them during illness and will see your child for annual health check-ups. </p><p>Some cities have multi-disciplinary clinics that offer expertise and help co-ordinate care for children with Down syndrome. Check with your regional children’s hospital to find out if these programs are available in your area. </p><br><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/down_syndrome.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/down_syndrome.jpg Down syndrome is a genetic condition present at birth. Learn about the symptoms, complications and outlook for children with Down syndrome.Main
Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child MEnglishDevelopmentalPreschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-07-20T04:00:00Z7.2000000000000065.6000000000000754.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the everyday activities you can do with your young child to help develop their math skills.</p><h2>Playing games</h2><h3>Supporting the development of your child’s math skills can be fun</h3><ul><li>Playing card games such as Go Fish, War, Spit, Uno and Concentration are an engaging way to support your child’s knowledge of numbers, number sequences and number concepts such “more than” or “less than”.</li><li>Young children may enjoy setting up a store with a register, which can support money identification, money value, and basic addition and subtraction.</li><li>Have your child create their own game with dice and rules, and play it as a family. This also allows your child to practice number recognition and planning.</li><li>Activities using a stopwatch can support the understanding of numbers, time estimation and elapsed time.</li><li>Puzzle books with connect-the-dots puzzles support development of number sequences.</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>​Everyday activities can support your pre-school and school-aged child in developing a positive attitude towards math and essential skills.</li><li>Workbooks and computer programs provide extra exposure and practice.</li></ul><h2>Math in everyday life</h2><ul><li>Teach your child about temperature and have them report it to you each morning.</li><li>Point out the time and calculate how much time various activities take to create a schedule with your child (e.g., measure how long it takes the bus to get to school, how long it will be before dinner, how much time there is to play in the park, etc.).</li><li>Have a calendar hanging up and count how many days there are until an event (e.g., a birthday party, a holiday). Have your child write down and monitor those events to appreciate the passage of time.</li><li>Cooking or baking with your child exposes them to measuring and fractions.</li><li>Point out prices while shopping and ask your child to consider what items are “more” or “less”.</li><li>Have your child plan a movie night and ask them how much they think it would cost for your family to go to the theatre (i.e., the cost of the activity and any snacks).</li><li>Consider giving your child a weekly allowance, which will let them keep track of, estimate, and balance money.</li></ul><h2>Fostering spatial reasoning skills: Shapes are all around us</h2><p>There are various ways of <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=649&language=English">fostering spatial reasoning skills</a> in your child:</p><ul><li>Use spatial terms including “above”/“below”, “behind”/“in front” and “near”/“far” in everyday activities (e.g., when taking dishes out of the dishwasher) or while playing games (e.g., when setting up a train set).</li><li>Talk about spatial properties (e.g., doing up laces – over and under; placing things in the trunk of a car).</li><li>Take turns pointing out spaces around you (e.g., while out walking consider the different shapes that comprise a house or a garden and how they relate to one another).</li><li>Use paper and pencil mazes to support development of your child’s visual problem-solving, planning and visual-spatial skills.</li><li>Play games such as Mighty Minds, Tetris and Blockus to support development of your child’s visual problem-solving, planning and visual-spatial skills.</li><li>Have fun making paper airplanes, paper fortune tellers, and origami.</li></ul><h2>Looking for patterns</h2><ul><li>Look for and point out recurring patterns (e.g., on floor tiles, clothing, utensils on the dinner table, house styles on the street, windows on houses, stones/beds in gardens, etc.).</li><li>Make up patterns using different colours, sizes, shapes, rhythms or actions (e.g., reciting nursery rhymes, crafting with beads, clapping or singing music patterns).</li></ul><h2>General tips</h2><ul><li>Praise your child for engaging in math activities.</li><li>Encourage your child to ask for help when they need it.</li><li>Include math activities in daily life.</li></ul><h3>What if I have questions about my child’s math development?</h3><p>Early math skills provide the foundation for later math development. Practising math in a variety of contexts, both at school and at home, can support your child’s learning. Without mastering early skills, learning more advanced math can be difficult for your child. If you think your child may be falling behind in math, please speak to their teacher.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p>Workbooks are available that can be used to supplement the school math curriculum and activities. Look for ones that use the Canadian curriculum. Use books in keeping with your child’s functional skills level, which may be higher or lower than their grade level.</p><p>Computer programs are also available to support development. Many school boards used specific programs, such as Prodigy or IXL, and may share your child’s skill level and details with you for practice at home. These types of programs can also be purchased by families.</p><p>The following document contains further activities that you can do at home: <a href="http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/parentguidenumen.pdf">http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/parentguidenumen.pdf</a><br></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/mathematics_problems_how_to_help.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Teacher%20and%20kids%20playing%20with%20geometric%20shapes.jpgMathematics: How to help your child ​Learn about the everyday activities, like playing games, you can do with your young child to help develop their math skills. Main
Sexual health & pubertySexual health & pubertySexual health & pubertySEnglishAdolescent;Genital and reproductive;PregnancyTeen (13-18 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Non-drug treatmentTeen (13-18 years) Pre-teen (9-12 years)NALanding PageCollection Hub<p>This page contains fact-based resources on various sexual health topics including pregnancy, contraception, STIs, what to expect at a sexual health care appointment.</p><p>This page contains fact-based resources on various sexual health topics including pregnancy, contraception, STIs, what to expect at a sexual health care appointment.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Sexual health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Resources to help answer questions you may have about your reproductive organs, pregnancy, birth control and STIs.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3986&language=English">The reproductive systems</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3987&language=English">Pregnancy and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3988&language=English">Contraception (birth control)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3989&language=English">Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3995&language=English">Consenting to sexual activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4037&language=English">Human papilloma virus (HPV) and genital warts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4038&language=English">Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sexfluent.ca/sexual-health">Sexual health (from Sexfluent.ca)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sexfluent.ca/modern-sex">Modern sex (from Sexfluent.ca)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">What happens during a sexual health-care appointment?</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn what to expect during a health-care appointment to discuss sexual or reproductive health, including questions you may be asked and what happens during a pelvic exam.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3990&language=English">What to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3991&language=English">What to expect during a pelvic exam</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Puberty</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Puberty is the time in life in your life when you start to become sexually and physically mature. Learn about some of the things that may begin happening during puberty like starting menstrual periods, developing acne, exploring masturbation, and growing body hair.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Periods (Menstruation)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4051&language=English">The menstrual cycle: What is menstruation?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4052&language=English">What is a menstrual period?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4025&language=English">Using your first tampon</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4035&language=English">Tattoos</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4036&language=English">Body piercing</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Additional resources</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find even more resources to help answer questions you may have about sexual and reproductive health as well as information on how to find a health clinic near you.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sexfluent.ca/">Sexfluent</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.actioncanadashr.org/">Action Canada for Sexual Health & Rights</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sexandu.ca/">Sex & U</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youngwomenshealth.org/sexual-health-index/">Center for Young Women's Health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youngmenshealthsite.org/">Young Men's Health</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Supporting-your-mental-health-and-wellbeing.jpgsexualhealthTeen sexual health hub Find fact-based resources on pregnancy, contraception, STIs, what to expect at a sexual health care appointment and more.Teens

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