AboutKidsHealth is a health education website for children, youth and their caregivers.


 

 

COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><p>This hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you cope. There are resources on how to support your child's mental health and general wellbeing through physical activity, sleep, nutrition and learning. Also included are videos and audio meditations to help you cope with stressful thoughts and experiences that occur throughout your day.<br></p> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fBkA2ZTUnyI"></iframe> <p>View Dr. Ronni's chat with Dr. Cheddar above.</p></div> <br> <div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/9Ay4u7OYOhA">6 steps to prevent COVID-19 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cmho.org/blog/blog-news/6519918-talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3882&language=English">COVID-19: Frequently asked questions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3888&language=English">Stressed adults and anxious young children: Supporting infants, toddlers and preschoolers through COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/AboutSickKids/Newsroom/Past-News/2020/joint-statement-school-reopening.html">SickKids - Joint statement on reopening schools</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/sites/default/files/2020-07/HB-BackToSchool-Recommendations.pdf">Return to school recommendations for children with special needs (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1903&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1881&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=721&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=649&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3889&language=English">Virtual care at SickKids</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video for children)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Audio meditations for mindfulness and coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Listen to these meditations in a quiet, comfortable spot to practise mindfulness, learn about ways to cope with physical and emotional pain or discomfort and to help you with stress throughout your day.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3cevA6EjCbE">5 senses</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/O5F3-Xw2XPE">The mountain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/YnL-hjXo4EQ">Self-compassion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/fZdw6wm3A3E">Body scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jc64ap852FU">Circle of gratitude</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/LMu-r-KZ_l8">Tree meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/xcO8IIeV12M">Mindfulness of thought</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Coping with physical and emotional pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3IK7yWuEs3k">Visualize your pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/UbTyPgHf8z4">Soften, soothe, allow</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/NN7fz8lMTIM">Ice cube</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/e0JMtabUVvQ">Comfort your pain</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Finding calm/coping with stress</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RQJNdVtHxlY">Time for rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RpHvQkHYrZ0">Allowing rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">Breathing meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/CMcx9tJ70rA">Joy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Equal breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QSf0JS0O16Q">Key word guided meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Tsi2np8xtVY">Bell meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/263e093H5eM">Bell sounds</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Jqu3SOEKtvE">Progressive muscle relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/4ilNITE3-fE">Relaxation with imagery</a></li></ol></li></ol></div> <div class="asset-video"> <br> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuU99GGMBBV2N_b2tsRwMx0m"></iframe> <p>Above is our COVID-focused playlist. See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19Main
COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditionsCOVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditionsCOVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditionsCEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversFever;Cough;Runny nose2020-03-18T04:00:00Z10.000000000000051.1000000000000798.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children who are immunocompromised and children with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk of complications from the novel coronavirus COVID-19.</p><p>Children who are immunocompromised and children with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk of complications from the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The following questions and answers may help you during this outbreak.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>SickKids is safe for you and your child to come to for assessment as directed by your primary care team.</li><li>Children who are immunocompromised and children with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk of developing complications if they do get COVID-19.</li><li>Washing your hands frequently using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, or by using soap and water for 20 seconds will help to prevent you from getting COVID-19.</li><li>Your child should continue to take their regular medications as prescribed by their primary care team unless specifically instructed otherwise.</li></ul> <h2>What is novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?</h2><p>A new or novel strain of coronavirus was identified in late 2019, and has now spread across the globe. The World Health Organization has named this novel coronavirus COVID-19 and has declared the outbreak a pandemic.</p><h2>Is my child immunocompromised?</h2><p>Immunocompromised children have weak immune systems. A weak immune system could be caused by many different medical conditions or medications. Some examples include children who have:</p><ul><li>had a solid organ transplant (i.e. heart, kidney, lung, liver, intestinal)</li><li>had a bone marrow transplant</li><li>cancer</li><li>congenital or primary immunodeficiency</li><li>HIV/AIDS</li><li>rheumatological disease</li><li>gastrointestinal disease</li><li>severe burns</li></ul><p>And those who are:</p><ul><li>taking selective immunomodulators (i.e. anti-TNF agents, azathioprine, MMF and all immunosuppressive agents).</li><li>taking long-term steroid therapy</li><li>in a severely malnourished state</li></ul><p>If you are unsure if your child is immunocompromised, please check with your primary care team at the hospital.</p><h2>Is my child at higher risk of getting COVID-19?</h2><p>There is still a lot being learned about COVID-19. At this time, serious illness in children appears to be less common than it is in adults. It is not yet clear whether children with underlying or chronic medical conditions are at greater risk of being infected with COVID-19, or of serious illness if they get the infection. Based on what is known about the influenza virus, it would not be unexpected for immunocompromised children, or children with an underlying chronic medical condition (i.e. chronic lung disease) to be at increased risk of complications from a COVID-19 infection.</p><h2>How do I know if my child has COVID-19?</h2><p>Your child may have COVID-19 if they have some or all of the following symptoms:</p><ul><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=774&language=English">cough</a> or sneezing</li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=748&language=English">sore throat</a></li><li>difficulty breathing or fast breathing</li><li>body aches</li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headache</a></li><li>chills</li><li>fatigue</li><li> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a></li><li>runny or stuffy nose that progresses to one of the above symptoms</li></ul><p>While fever may be the main symptom in immunocompromised children, not all children with COVID-19 will have a fever. For children who have a runny or stuffy nose you should be most concerned about a possible COVID-19 infection if other symptoms develop. It is not yet known if immunocompromised children with a COVID-19 infection have different symptoms.</p><h2>Should I come to the hospital if I think my child has COVID-19?</h2><p>If your child has symptoms of COVID-19 contact your primary care team at the hospital before coming. They will help you determine if your child needs to be seen and where you should go.</p><p>You should come to the hospital right away if your child has the following symptoms:</p><ul><li>fast breathing or trouble breathing</li><li>bluish skin color</li><li>not drinking enough fluids</li><li>not waking up or not interacting</li><li>being so irritable that the child does not want to be held<br></li></ul><p>In an emergency please call an ambulance and tell the emergency services team that you are concerned your child may have a COVID-19 infection.</p><h2>Is testing for COVID-19 available at SickKids?</h2><p>Yes, testing is available at SickKids for children with weakened immune system that have concerning symptoms, such as fever and cough. Testing is usually done with a nose swab to try to identify various viruses. These swabs now test for COVID-19 as well.</p><h2>If my child is diagnosed with COVID-19, how long will they be sick?</h2><p>There is still a lot to be learned about COVID-19. Children with weakened immune systems may be sick for a longer period of time than other children. How long will vary from child to child.</p><h2>Should my child avoid public places such as shopping malls, public transit and playgrounds?</h2><p>At this time, it is recommended that social distancing including avoiding crowded environments is appropriate, in keeping with current public health recommendations. In crowded situations that cannot be avoided, extra precautions should be taken such as frequent handwashing. If you have alcohol-based hand sanitizer carry it with you to use when soap and water are not available. At this point, firm recommendations regarding summer camps cannot be made, however such camps will likely be cancelled if the outbreak continues unabated.</p><h2>What are effective measures to prevent COVID-19 spread?</h2><ul><li>Like other respiratory viruses, including influenza, it is recommended that you wash your hands frequently by using alcohol-based hand sanitizer, or by using soap and water for 20 seconds.</li><li>Limit touching your face, nose and eyes.<br></li><li>Avoid close contact with people who have a fever or cough.</li><li>Practice cough etiquette by keeping a distance from other people, coughing and sneezing into your sleeve or a tissue or a respiratory mask, and practicing frequent hand washing.</li></ul><h2>Are there any extra precautions that my child or I should be taking?</h2><p>Encourage your child to wash or sanitize their hands frequently. For example, if they are in school, you can provide older children with a bottle of alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Hand sanitizer can be dangerous if swallowed. Be careful to keep it away from young children. Avoid having your child be in close contact with anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19. Be vigilant for signs of infection in your child.</p><h2>Should my child wear a face mask when in public?</h2><ul><li>There is no current evidence that wearing a mask in public spaces will help your child to avoid infection from COVID-19. Other measures, such as careful hand washing and social distancing have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing transmission of the infection. However, you and your child may consider wearing a face covering (sucha as a cloth mask or bandana) in public spaces if physical distancing is not possible.</li><li>If your child has respiratory symptoms (i.e. fever, cough) and they are at the hospital for assessment, it is important that they wear a mask to avoid spreading infection to others. If you do not have a mask for this purpose you should ask for one when you arrive at the hospital.</li><li>Your primary care team may also advise your child to wear a mask for other reasons and you should follow this advice.</li></ul><h2>Should my child continue on their immunosuppressive medications?</h2><p>Your child should continue to take their regular medications as prescribed, unless directed differently by your primary care team at the hospital. Make sure you have enough medication and supplies on hand to last for 30 days, in case you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.</p><h2>Should we cancel our upcoming trip or vacation?</h2><p>Yes. At this time, it is recommended that any upcoming trips or vacations be cancelled until further notice.</p><h2>Can my child go to school?</h2><p>Please follow the guidance from the Ontario Ministry of Education and your child’s local school regarding mandatory school closure. If your child has any signs or symptoms of COVID-19 do not send them to school even if their school remains open.</p><h2>What should I do if I am unwell myself, or my child’s sibling becomes unwell with symptoms of COVID-19 infection?</h2><p>Contact your family doctor or paediatrician as it is recommended that unwell siblings or parents of children who are immunocompromised be tested for COVID-19. It is also advised that you practice social distancing at home as much as possible. You can also refer to Ontario general guidelines of who should be tested for COVID-19 and ways of accessing testing at <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus</a>.</p><h2>What should I do if a member of my household has recently returned from travel outside of Canada?</h2><p>People returning from travel outside of Canada should self-isolate for 14 days, in keeping with current public health recommendations. During that time period your child should avoid close contact with this person as much as possible.</p><h2>Should I or my teen who is immunocompromised go to work?</h2><p>Follow public heath guidelines and practice social distancing when appropriate. This may include avoiding work environments that involve contact with large groups of people. It is recommended that you or your teen who is immunocompromised try to work from home as much as possible.</p><h2>If my child requires assessment for symptoms other than COVID-19 infection what should we do?</h2><p>Continue to follow the recommendations for getting your child assessed according to your primary care team’s instructions, as you would do normally. For example, if your child is on medication that causes them to have a low white blood cell count and they develop a fever, you should still go to the hospital for assessment and let the primary care team know about your child’s symptoms as per normal procedure.</p><h2>Should I reschedule my upcoming routine appointment?</h2><p>Clinic appointments are being reviewed and many upcoming visits may be rescheduled or moved to virtual care by video or telephone, if possible. Medically necessary appointments will continue. Please contact your primary care team at the hospital for questions regarding your upcoming appointments.</p><h2>What if the province orders a lockdown and mandates people staying in their homes? Will we be able to get to the hospital?</h2><p>Even in those countries that have ordered lockdowns, people have still been able to travel for medically necessary reasons.</p><h2>Is it safe for my child to come to SickKids during the current outbreak?</h2><p>Yes, the hospital is safe for you and your child to go to for assessment as directed by your primary care team. At all times SickKids has clear procedures in place for protecting your child from getting an infection when visiting the hospital. During this time additional measures to protect you and your child have been put in place. Please follow SickKids instruction regarding the number of visitors permitted to accompany your child. Please see <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/coronavirus"> https://www.sickkids.ca/coronavirus</a> for further information.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19--Information_for_parents.jpgCOVID-19: Information for parentsMain
How to talk to your child about COVID-19How to talk to your child about COVID-19How to talk to your child about COVID-19HEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-31T04:00:00Z9.1000000000000058.90000000000001632.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Parents and caregivers play an important role in making sure their children receive honest and accurate information during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p><h2>Introduction</h2><p>The COVID-19 pandemic is interrupting our daily lives and children are impacted by this. They are not in school and their daily routines have been disrupted. Many may hear or see things about the COVID-19 pandemic and be worried and have questions. Parents and caregivers have an important role to play in making sure their children receive honest and accurate information that is appropriate for their developmental level.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Share ‘need to know’ information with your child, using age appropriate language.</li><li>Answer questions directly and honestly and do not make false promises.</li><li>It is okay if you do not know all the answers; focus on the short-term plan for the whole family.</li><li>If children are distressed, let them know that it is OK and understandable to have these feelings.</li><li>Model healthy coping skills and attend to your own physical and mental health.</li><li>Consider seeking out additional resources and supports for children with special needs or who are having trouble coping.</li> </ul><h2>How do I talk to my child about COVID-19?</h2><p>It is important for adults to provide accurate information that is appropriate to their child’s developmental level. For younger children, simple statements of facts are often enough. For example, you might say:</p><p> <em>“Lots of people have been getting sick with sore throats and coughs. We know that germs can cause this, so for now, places like schools, parks and stores are closed. This will help to stop the germs from spreading. We also need to wash our hands a lot, to keep ourselves and others healthy.”</em></p><p>Older children and teens may ask additional questions about where or how the pandemic began, what the leaders of our community and country are doing about it, how the pandemic affects them and how long the pandemic will last. Parents and caregivers should provide accurate, balanced and non-blaming or stigmatizing information to their children. For example, you might say:</p><p> <em>“The world is facing this challenge together and many people are working hard to come up with ways to help. As a matter of fact, the reason we are staying home is because scientists have learned this is the best way to reduce the impact of the virus. By staying home, you help to protect those that are more vulnerable such as the elderly and people with weaker immune systems.”</em></p><p>Or you could say:</p><p> <em>“This is not the first time the world has faced a challenge like this, and people become resourceful and start working together during such times to get things done. Researchers are sharing their findings to speed up progress to find treatments. Doctors and scientists across the world are talking to each other about what treatments may work and what treatments do not work. It is important you are aware not everything posted online is true. Many sites use clickbait to get you to look at information that is exaggerated, misleading or untrue.”</em></p><p>It is okay to say you do not know all the answer to your child’s questions, or that you are feeling worried as well. When talking to your child, try to present a hopeful positive outlook and tone. Be mindful of news, radio, or social media information your children are exposed to and minimize their exposure if not appropriate to their level of understanding.</p><p>Also, emphasize that your family is taking the right steps to stay safe going forward. Remember your child is not only learning from what you are explaining with words, but also, perhaps more so, from how you behave. If your actions show you are nervous and stressed, then your child will “learn” that the situation is stressful and being nervous and stressed is the best way to deal with it. In contrast, if you remain calm and composed about the situation, your child will feel safer and learn that staying calm is the best way to deal with it. Children pick up on and mirror your cues. Your children will also notice if you are ‘hiding’ things from them or having whispered conversations with other adults; this will add to a child’s stress. If you are having difficulty managing your own anxiety, ask for help from family, friends, and if needed, your health-care provider.</p><h2>How do I answer my child’s questions about COVID-19?</h2><p>When answering your child’s questions, try to find out what your child already knows. Provide accurate and honest information that is appropriate for their developmental level. Do not make false promises about how long the pandemic will last, as things are changing every day. The Centers for Disease Control has provided some <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/talking-with-children.html">child friendly answers to common health related questions about COVID-19</a>.</p><h2>Encourage children to help with planning and focus on the short-term</h2><p>Parents and caregivers can acknowledge the uncertainty regarding the coming weeks and months. They can encourage the whole family to be flexible with their plans and focus on the short-term. It can be helpful for everyone to focus on their community and their family and find safe ways to help others during the pandemic. Both children and adults feel better if they can do something. It is important to realize that even simple actions can be of great importance; for example, calling someone regularly who you know is alone or has difficulty coping with the situation. Where possible you can consider involving your child in these actions. Some examples include reaching out to relatives, friends and neighbors using methods such as social media, email, phone calls or video chat; writing letters or cards; or coming up with activities that can be shared remotely with other families. Reaching out to local online community and school groups may be another good place to start.</p><p>Work with your child to develop a daily schedule. This could include academic and learning activities, leisure and creative activities, and physical activities. It can be helpful to schedule or limit non-academic screen time from the beginning, to avoid overuse and a future need to cut back. Refer to the family schedule throughout the day. For some children an entire day can be overwhelming, so break the schedule down into shorter periods of time (for example, a morning schedule and an afternoon schedule). Try to stick to a consistent routine for waking up, meals and snacks, and bedtime. Routines offer security and predictability to children.</p><h2>If your child is upset, validate their feelings</h2><p>It is common for children (and adults) to feel scared, upset, anxious or distressed during stressful times. For some children, this may take the form of tantrums and difficult behaviours such as aggression. Other children may have more trouble getting to sleep. Some children might show regression, temporarily losing a previously acquired skill, as a symptom of anxiety. Examples include if your child starts wetting the bed or asking for more help with daily tasks such as getting dressed.</p><p>Parents and caregivers should validate their children’s feelings by saying for example: <em>“I can see you are really scared right now” or “You really miss your school and friends, it is hard to be home all day.”</em> Avoid providing false reassurance or trying to fix their distress. Offer concrete reassurance by saying for example: <em>“I am here for you when you are ready, or if you need me”</em> and <em>“We will get through this together.”</em> For younger children, distraction and redirection can also be helpful. For example, you can suggest reading a book together. Remember that children are adaptable and resilient by nature.</p><h2>Model healthy coping skills and attend to your own physical and mental health</h2><p>It is vital that parents and caregivers take care of their own physical health and stress level during the pandemic. Look after yourself because your children depend on you. This includes eating nutritious food, getting adequate sleep, taking care of your grooming, and trying to include exercise in your day. Find a few quiet moments each day and listen to music, meditate or pray, do yoga and connect with loved ones.</p><p>Children take their cues from parents and caregivers. If you as a parent or caregiver are anxious or panicked, then your child will pick up on this and likely feel the same way. Social isolation and high levels of stress can be overwhelming for everyone; it is okay for parents to step away, take breaks, and seek help when needed.</p><p>Parents and children should avoid listening to and looking at too much news and media content as this can cause and increase anxiety. You should pick a reliable news source and check in no more than once or twice each day. Reach out to your family physician or other supports if you are having trouble coping. See the <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Centre for Addition and Mental Health</a> website for recommendations and supports for adults.</p><h2>Consider seeking out additional resources for your child</h2><p>For children with unique communication needs or developmental disabilities, consider seeking out additional resources to explain what is happening. For example, visit Autism Speaks Canada for a <a href="https://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/flu_teaching_story_final%20%281%29.pdf">flu teaching story</a> to share with your child.</p><p>For children and youth who are experiencing ongoing increased distress or anxiety, consider reaching out to your regular health-care providers. Most providers should be able to offer virtual or phone check-ups. Some helpful online apps to help parents (and children) cope are listed below.</p><ul><li><a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/">Anxiety Canada</a> website has helpful information and guides to develop an anxiety plan for people of all ages.</li><li>Mental health apps: <a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/resources/mindshift-cbt/">MindShift</a>, <a href="https://www.calm.com/">Calm</a>, <a href="https://www.headspace.com/headspace-meditation-app">Headspace</a>, <a href="https://www.stopbreathethink.com/">Stop, breathe and think</a> and <a href="https://www.stopbreathethink.com/kids/">Stop, breathe and think kids</a>. These offer general coping strategies and introductions to cognitive behavioural therapy. All of them have some free content or trials.</li><li>Mindfulness and meditation: <a href="https://www.smilingmind.com.au/">Smiling mind</a> (meditation for all ages), and <a href="https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/ucla-mindful-app">UCLA Mindful</a>.</li><li><a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/mentalhealth?topic=guidedmeditations">Guided meditations</a> from AboutKidsHealth, a health education resource for children, youth and caregivers that is approved by health-care providers at The Hospital for Sick Children.</li></ul><h2>References</h2><p>Autism Speaks Canada. Visual Supports and Autism Spectrum Disorder tool kit. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/visual-supports-and-autism-spectrum-disorder-1/">https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/visual-supports-and-autism-spectrum-disorder-1/</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 16). Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/">https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 30). Talking with children about Coronavirus Disease 2019. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/talking-with-children.html">https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/talking-with-children.html</a></p><p>Centre for Addition and Mental Health. (2020). Mental Health and the COVID-19 Pandemic. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19</a></p><p>National Association for School Psychologist. (2020, February 29). Talking to Children About COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Retrieved from <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/NASN/3870c72d-fff9-4ed7-833f-215de278d256/UploadedImages/PDFs/02292020_NASP_NASN_COVID-19_parent_handout.pdf</a></p> https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/How_to_talk_to_your_child_about_COVID-19.jpgMain
Mental healthMental healthMental healthMEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANACaregivers Adult (19+)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn how to support your child’s well-being with activity, sleep and nutrition; and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions.</p><p>This hub includes resources for parents on how to support your child's mental health and general well-being through physical activity, sleep and nutrition. It also provides information on the signs, symptoms and treatments of different mental health conditions, including anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, behavioural disorders, anorexia nervosa and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.<br></p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuURSU5nmvDVZhSR8Ibr7NHK" frameborder="0"></iframe><br></div><p>Above is our mental health video playlist. To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The everyday pressures of growing up can put a strain on any child's mental well-being. Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them through difficult times.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and well-being</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Screen time</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=639&language=English">Nutrition: How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Anxiety disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Every child feels anxiety at some point as a natural part of growing up. An anxiety disorder, however, is when anxious feelings interfere with a child's everyday routine. Learn more about the signs, symptoms and range of anxiety disorders and how they ​are treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=271&language=English">Anxiety: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=270&language=English">Types of anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">Anxiety: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Resources for coping with anxiety</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">The CARD System - Coping with your child's anxiety (for parents/caregivers)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Obsessive compulsive disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) occurs when a person suffers from troubling and intrusive thoughts and/or follows repetitive or strict routines to feel less worried. Learn about the causes, signs and impact of this disorder and how you can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">Obsessive compulsive disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=288&language=English">OCD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=286&language=English">How OCD affects your child's life</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=709&language=English">OCD: Psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=287&language=English">OCD: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Depression</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Depression is an illness that causes someone to feel deep sadness or a lack of interest in activities that they once enjoyed. Discover how this condition affects a child's mood, sleep, concentration and energy levels, and how it can be treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=284&language=English">Depression: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=707&language=English">Depression: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=708&language=English">Depression: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Bipolar disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>When a person has bipolar disorder, they alternate between low and elevated moods for days, weeks or months at a time. Learn about the bipolar disorder spectrum, the symptoms of manic and depressive episodes and how medications, therapy and lifestyle changes can help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=279&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=280&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=704&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=705&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Suicide and self-harm</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A child who experiences thoughts of suicide or self-harm is often suffering from overwhelming emotional pain. Find out how to help your child cope with difficult emotions, how to support and protect your child and where to find professional help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=291&language=English">Suicide in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=289&language=English">Self-harm in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=290&language=English">Signs and symptoms of suicide risk</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=293&language=English">How to help your child with difficult emotions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=292&language=English">How to protect your child from harm</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Eating disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>An eating disorder not only risks your child's health but can also disrupt family life. Find out about the symptoms and treatment of anorexia, bulimia, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and binge eating disorder and how you can help your child recover.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Anorexia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=268&language=English">Anorexia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=269&language=English">Anorexia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=267&language=English">Anorexia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=700&language=English">Anorexia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=266&language=English">Anorexia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Bulimia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=282&language=English">Bulimia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=283&language=English">Bulimia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=281&language=English">Bulimia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=706&language=English">Bulimia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=294&language=English">Bulimia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=274&language=English">Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=275&language=English">ARFID: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=273&language=English">ARFID: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=703&language=English">ARFID: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=272&language=English">ARFID: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Binge eating disorder (BED)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=277&language=English">Binge eating disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=278&language=English">BED: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=640&language=English">Obesity: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=276&language=English">BED: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves difficulties with controlling attention and regulating behaviour. Discover the main symptoms of ADHD in children and teens, how the disorder is diagnosed and how to help your child at home and at school.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1922&language=English">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1923&language=English">ADHD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1997&language=English">ADHD: How to help your child at home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1999&language=English">ADHD: Communicating with your child's school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1998&language=English">ADHD: Treatment with medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Behavioural disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Behavioural disorders include oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder. Learn how these disorders differ from typical misbehaviour, how therapy and medications can help and how you can manage problematic behaviour at home.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1924&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2001&language=English">Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is triggered by experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event. Learn about the main symptoms of PTSD, how the condition is diagnosed and how psychotherapy and medications can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1927&language=English">Post-traumatic stress disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1928&language=English">PTSD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2005&language=English">PTSD: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Brain disorders and mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A brain disorder includes a condition, illness or injury that affects the brain and how it develops before or after birth. Find out how a brain disorder can affect your child's learning, mood and social skills, how its impact on mental health is assessed and how to help your child cope.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1926&language=English">Brain disorders and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2002&language=English">Brain disorders: Assessing your child for neuropsychological difficulties</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2003&language=English">Brain disorders: How to help your child cope</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2004&language=English">Brain disorders: Common treatments</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Parenting a child with a chronic condition</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A chronic conditions can affect a child's mental health and everyday routines. Discover how parents and caregivers can help manage both their child's health care and routines, and support their own mental health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3400&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3401&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Helping your child manage their health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3402&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Maintaining your child's everyday routines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3403&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Supporting yourself as a caregiver</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Substance use disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Substance use is the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs for pleasure or enjoyment. Learn about the signs and symptoms of substance use and how you can help your teen if you suspect they have a substance use disorder.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3663&language=English">Substance use disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3664&language=English">Substance use disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=English">Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Understanding functional symptoms and somatization</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Somatization involves expressing distress through physical symptoms. Find out about the mind-body connection, signs of somatization and the various ways to support your child or teen.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3666&language=English">Functional symptoms: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3667&language=English">Mind-body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3668&language=English">Somatization: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3669&language=English">Somatization: Common treatments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3770&language=English">Somatization: How to help your child or teen cope</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Mental_health_landing-page.jpgmentalhealthhealthylivingMain
Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisisSupporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisisSupporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisisSEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-04-14T04:00:00Z9.8000000000000057.60000000000003300.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about strategies and ways to help your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder cope during the COVID-19 crisis.</p><h2>Introduction</h2><p>Children with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder, can be vulnerable to changes in routines. Unlike school holidays that are known about and can be planned for in advance, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unexpected closures to schools, programs and services. The situation is changing rapidly, and extra planning and support may be needed to help your child to cope with these changes.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Communicate at your child’s developmental level and use age-appropriate language.</li><li>Be a positive role model for your child and help them to cope and stay calm.</li><li>Set your child up for success by setting up a reward system, planning daily physical activity and promoting good sleep.</li><li>Watch for changes in your child’s behaviour. These could be signs that your child is becoming more stressed or anxious.</li><li>Use strategies to help manage challenging behaviours at home.</li><li>Know when to seek help if you need it. It is common and normal to feel anxious and stressed during times of crisis.</li></ul> <h2>Communicate at your child’s developmental level</h2><p>Use language that is appropriate for your child’s level of understanding to explain what is happening. Share concrete, visual information in the form of:</p><ul><li>Stories: This <a href="https://childdevcenter.org/news/social-stories-for-kids-about-covid-19/">website</a> has links to several social stories for children about COVID-19</li><li>Cartoons: This <a href="https://www.ppmd.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/The-Corona-Virus-Free-Printable-Updated-2-The-Autism-Educator-.pdf">cartoon</a> helps children understand about the virus and why their routines have changed</li> <li>Websites: Many websites have additional examples of <a href="https://www.kerrysplace.org/covid-19-resources/">communication resources</a></li></ul><p>For children who are non-vocal communicators (who cannot speak), make sure they have access to their communication system (such as pictures and visual boards, type-to-talk devices, tablet or smart phone AAC apps) to ask questions and express their feelings.</p><p>Answer your child’s questions simply and honestly, providing essential, ‘need to know’ information. Let them know you want to make sure everyone is safe and healthy. Try to focus on what will happen today and tomorrow, rather than talking about what will happen in the more distant future.</p><p>Acknowledge your child’s feelings, even if they do not express them out loud. Tell them you understand it must be very hard for them right now because they cannot see their friends and teachers, go to the places they like to visit or do many of the things they like to do. Let them know you are going to help them during this time and make positive statements such as “We will get through this together.” Some children may not want to talk about the current situation; they may express their feelings through play or art. Extra time for creative endeavours can help children process their feelings in their own way.</p><p>For tips on how to talk to your child about COVID-19, read this <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">article</a> or view this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=25&v=WhVad8ToCiU&feature=emb_logo">short video</a>.</p><h2>Help your child to cope and stay calm</h2><p>Children take their cues from their parents and caregivers. If parents and caregivers are anxious or panicked, children will pick up on this and likely feel the same way. Try to be a positive role model for your child by remaining calm and optimistic without giving false hope and making promises you cannot keep. It is OK to tell children that this is hard for you too and that we all need extra help sometimes. If you are having trouble managing, ask for help from family, friends, and if needed, your health-care provider.</p><h3>Routine and predictability</h3><p>Routine and predictability are important for children with neurodevelopmental disorder to feel in control and to make sense of the world around them. Develop a schedule to follow (for links to examples, see the Resource section) and refer to it throughout the day. Some children may prefer you decide what activities are on the schedule. Other children may prefer to have a list of activities they can choose from (use photos of activities for children who don’t read). Some families find that pairing a list of acceptable and desired activities with specific rewards or tokens for completion can give children a sense of control and allow them buy-in while minimizing struggles with parent-enforced transitions. Finding an option that works best for you and your child is key.</p><h3>Identify calming activities</h3><p>Make a list of activities that are calming for your child, such as taking a bath or watching a favourite video, and add these to your schedule. For children with autism spectrum disorder, recognize that repetitive activities (e.g., lining up toys, repeating dialogue from a movie) and stereotypic motor movements (e.g., turning in circles) may help them calm down when they are upset. It may also be necessary to build more calming activities into your child’s schedule and give up some academic or other more challenging tasks.</p><h3>Reduce sensory input</h3><p>Many children with neurodevelopmental disorder experience sensory overload and can become overwhelmed when the environment is too noisy, too crowded, too bright or there are too many things to look at. If possible, it may be helpful to create a new calming spot for your child that is quieter, dimly lit and has fewer visual distractions (especially if they are now confined to a busy home). This calming spot could be in a room that is not used very often or is away from the noise and activity. If space is limited, try to section off part of a larger room to create a smaller space. For younger children, you can cover a table with a sheet to make a private sitting area or pull a couch away from the wall. Consider offering your child earphones, noise cancelling headphones or eye shades.</p><h2>Set your child (and your routines) up for success</h2><p>Identify the best times and most challenging times in the day for your child and plan activities and demands accordingly. If your child is usually better able to handle demands in the mornings, structure learning activities or less preferred tasks during those times. During times when they are feeling tired or bored, different sensory activities can be offered such as deep pressure squeezes, water play, rice bins and light-up toys. Finger painting on windows with children’s paint is also a good activity to try as it can be washed away easily and repeated. There are many suggestions for activities circulating <a href="https://busytoddler.com/">online</a>. If your child needs some time alone, it is a good idea to have a ‘sensory bin’ available for them with items like stress or Koosh balls, slinky toys, spin tops, playdough or modelling clay, and glow sticks.</p><h3>Set up a reward system for your child</h3><p>In addition to following a daily schedule, consider reinforcing (rewarding) your child for completing activities and behaving in appropriate ways with a token system. Tokens can be checkmarks, coins, buttons or other items. Once your child has earned all their tokens, they can exchange them for a preferred item such as a snack, toy or screen time. Let them know how much time they have for their preferred activity and then reset the token system. Choose the appropriate number of tokens based on your child’s abilities. Some children work for four or five tokens before getting their reward whereas others can wait longer and work for 10 or 20 tokens. Some children may not be able to grasp a token exchange system and will need an immediate reward to reinforce a desired behaviour. When a token is given, it should not be taken away regardless of what behaviour follows. Your child is earning tokens as a reward for good behaviour. If they engage in problematic behaviours at other times, do what you can to calm them down and then return to the daily schedule and you can give them a token at that point.</p><h3>Plan daily physical activity</h3><p>Some children need frequent movement breaks throughout the day. This can be challenging to do indoors, but there are some activities that can be done safely and use up some of that energy. Activities such as jumping jacks, bouncing on yoga balls or a mini trampoline, and even timed races from one side of a room to another are possible, and an adult should be present to supervise. You can move furniture to the centre of the room so that your child can run around it. You can play ‘the floor is lava’ throughout the home by putting down sheets of paper as the ‘rocks’ you are allowed to step on. There are also many children’s workout and yoga videos available online including some with popular characters. If you are not strictly isolating at home, then plan regular hikes or playing in a field or backyard. Avoid public play structures or parks as it may be hard for your child or youth to be told they cannot use the equipment.</p><h3>Promote good sleep</h3><p>It is important to promote good sleep during these stressful times. Disrupted sleep can be a sign that your child is having difficulty coping. It can also contribute to behaviour changes in your child.</p><p>Strategies to promote good sleep hygiene include:</p><ul><li>Maintaining a regular bedtime routine. Try to keep bedtime and wake up times consistent.</li><li>Creating an environment in your child’s bedroom that encourages sleep. A cooler temperature, dark or dim light, and quiet are ideal. Some children like white noise. If possible, avoid the use of screens (i.e., phone, computer, tablets) in the bedroom, and minimize access to stimulating and preferred toys in the bedroom at night.</li><li>Avoiding certain foods too close to bedtime as they can interfere with sleep. For example, eating large meals, sugar and chocolate too close to bedtime can keep children awake at night.<br></li><li>Limiting screen time if possible for about an hour before bedtime.</li><li>Encouraging relaxation before bed:</li><ul><li>Encourage quiet activities such as reading (together or independently) or listening to soothing music.</li><li>Practise relaxation techniques such as <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Stess%20Busters%20Deep%20Breathing%20Resource%20combined.pdf">deep breathing</a>, guided meditation or progressive muscle relaxation. Some children also enjoy receiving a massage.</li><li>Defer ‘worry time’ until the next day. If your child is anxious and asking a lot of questions, reassure them, and try to direct them to talk about it during a set time the next day, but not before bed.</li></ul></ul><h2>Watch for changes in your child’s behaviour</h2><p>Be on the lookout for signs your child is becoming more stressed or anxious. This may be new behaviour you have not seen before or existing behaviour that becomes more intense or lasts longer than usual. Examples of behaviours can include pacing, yelling, crying, hitting or throwing objects. Other children may appear more shut down or withdrawn. If possible, try to talk to your child about what may be upsetting them and identify what to do next. This could include providing validation and reassurance, offering to help them with a task they find frustrating, directing them to a quiet space to calm down, checking the schedule to see what is coming up next or offering different activities to choose from (this strategy is known as distraction and redirection). Children who are hungry, fatigued or feel unwell may also show changes in their behaviour, so it is important to identify and address possible sources of pain or discomfort. Be flexible with the daily schedule if it seems to be making behaviours worse.</p><h2>Use strategies to manage challenging behaviours at home</h2><h3>Ensure a safe environment</h3><p>Sometimes when children become very upset or distressed, they are unable to control their emotions, and this can result in tantrums or “meltdowns”. During a meltdown, a child may, for example, scream, use angry language, hit others or themselves and throw things around. First and foremost, parents and caregivers need to stay calm. If possible, direct your child to a safe space where the tantrum can run its course while keeping everyone (and the environment) safe. If this is not possible, then try to make the space around your child safe by removing furniture that can be toppled over or objects that could be damaged or thrown. You may need to put down cushions, mats or blankets to protect your child from injury due to falling to the floor. Stand close by to supervise but not so close that you may get hit and be aware of exits to ensure your child does not run away. It can be helpful to have a room (or part of a room) in the home where the environment has been made safe in advance; this could include removing breakable or very heavy objects, securing tall furniture and having available preferred and soothing objects.</p><h3>Let the meltdown run its course</h3><p>For many children, tantrum or meltdown behaviours are signs of over-arousal and loss of control. Efforts to negotiate, reason with, punish or “bribe” children during a meltdown often make things worse. Try not to reward tantrum behaviours such as by giving in to previous requests or defaulting to screen time, as it can make tantrums occur more often. Stand nearby quietly, or gently hold or hug your child if that is safer. Occasionally make gentle soothing statements, for example, “I’m here for you when you need me,” or offer a distraction or solution by saying for example, “When you are feeling ready, we can read a book or have a snack.” Avoid complex sentences or detailed explanations or instructions. Most children cannot think rationally during these times and will be unable to respond to even simple demands or suggestions.</p><h3>Identify common triggers and make a plan</h3><p>Certain times of the day, particular activities starting or ending, or specific stressors may regularly trigger challenging behaviours for your child. During a calm time, it can be helpful to develop a family strategy to address this (with or without your child’s involvement) in advance. Some children benefit from using behavioural strategies to reinforce desired behaviours (while often ignoring or redirecting undesired behaviours). Some children may need extra direct teaching and practice to learn self-regulation skills.</p><h2>A behavioural strategy is a plan to improve a specific behaviour that is challenging</h2><p> <strong>Step 1. Pick one behaviour.</strong> Select one specific target behaviour to start with (e.g., reduce meltdowns and aggression when the tablet is turned off). It may be tempting to address several behaviours, but it is key to start with one specific behaviour.</p><p> <strong>Step 2. Make your child part of the team.</strong> During a calm period, discuss with your child that you want to help them improve the specific behaviour that you identified in Step 1. For example, you could say “I notice when it is time to turn off your game, things get really difficult for everyone. We are going to try a new plan today when that happens.” As much as possible, try to see your child as a member of the same team; you are working together to improve the target behaviour. If the behaviour occurs in specific situations, do your best to ensure those trigger moments are predictable for your child. For this example, you could say, “From now on, all screens have to be turned off at 12:00 p.m. as everyone has to come for lunch.”</p><p> <strong>Step 3: Small steps.</strong> Break the desired outcome into small steps and start with a reasonable and attainable goal that your child sometimes meets already. For example, a first step could include having your child go to their room for a break for a few minutes to calm down before lunch, using a coping skill such as deep breaths or jumping jacks or keeping their hands gentle and arms down. Maybe your child can help decide what are reasonable steps towards the end goal. This way, they will feel part of the team.</p><p> <strong>Step 4: Good behaviour deserves a reward.</strong> This is a step where your child may be eager to help decide what are reasonable rewards that can be gained for each step. You can consider using a token system so that your child can earn and collect tokens that can later be exchanged for a reward.</p><p> <strong>Step 5. Give time for transitions.</strong> Help your child prepare by giving friendly warnings. For example, with the example above, you should provide a warning at 11:55 a.m., and remind your child once of the new plan.</p><p> <strong>Step 6. Execute your plan, together.</strong> When the plan is in action, wait for things to settle. With the example above, your child may became upset but is able to go to their room and calm down. Congratulate your child for having accomplished, or having attempted to accomplish, the first step towards better dealing with frustration and provide them with a token.</p><h3>A few ground rules</h3><p> <em>Do not take away tokens</em> or provide rewards for non-compliance. A good and honest attempt should be rewarded, even if the entire goal was not met.</p><p> <em>Be flexible</em>: If your child is not meeting the goal, make the first step smaller and more attainable.</p><p>It is best to reward active behaviours (e.g., keeping their hands gentle) as opposed to rewarding them for not doing something (e.g., not hitting).</p><p> <em>Follow through with consequences.</em> If some behaviours do merit a clear consequence, this should be separate from their rewards. Autism Speaks Canada has a <em> <a href="https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/challenging-behaviors-tool-kit1/">Challenging Behaviour Toolkit</a></em> that can be requested.</p><h2>Know when to seek help</h2><p>These are especially challenging times, perhaps more so for parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorder. Some or all of the carefully organized supports and routines are discontinued due to the COVID-19 pandemic.</p><p>It is common and normal to feel anxious, afraid or irritable under these extreme circumstances. Most importantly, as parents and caregivers, we all need to do our best to be supportive, caring and loving to our children during times of stress.</p><p>Pay attention to your own mental health and seek <a href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">help and care</a> if you need it. Social isolation and high levels of stress can be overwhelming for everyone. It is OK for parents to step away, take breaks and seek help when needed. It may also be helpful to monitor your own screen time and news consumption and try to limit this if you feel it increases your level of stress.<br></p><p>At present, the health-care system is under pressure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of the regular services your child uses may be temporarily unavailable, and access to some crisis services may be restricted. At the same time, new services are being created to provide online support and advice. Service availability and accessibility may continue to change for as long as the pandemic is present. Therefore, it is advised that you reach out to your regular care team (therapist, pediatrician, family doctor, autism or developmental centre), explain the problem you are facing with your child and ask for support. Your regular health-care provider will have the latest information regarding services. Some children may require a new medication or a change in medication to help them get through this time safely at home.</p><h2>What do if there is a crisis</h2><ul><li>It can be helpful to have a ‘crisis plan’ prepared in advance. This can involve identifying coping strategies for parents and children, as well as identifying key supports and individuals, and how to contact them. Letting professional and family support people know in advance that you may be calling on them in a time of crisis can help everyone be prepared.</li><li>If the situation allows, call your regular care team (therapist, pediatrician, family doctor) as they should have the latest information regarding emergency mental health care services.</li><li>Call 911, highlight the mental health or behavioural concern and ask if a mobile crisis team is available to respond instead of the traditional approach. This will not always be possible.</li><li>If you feel that presentation to the emergency department is required, please call them first. Because of COVID-19, there may be restrictions or specific regulations in place that can help protect you and your child against possible contamination (or protect health-care workers and other patients).</li></ul><h2>Additional Resources</h2><p> <strong>Online toolkit for supporting individuals with ASD during the crisis</strong><br><a href="https://ed.unc.edu/2020/03/19/unc-team-creates-online-toolkit-for-those-supporting-individuals-with-autism-during-covid-19-epidemic/">https://ed.unc.edu/2020/03/19/unc-team-creates-online-toolkit-for-those-supporting-individuals-with-autism-during-covid-19-epidemic/</a></p><p> <strong>Tips for daily schedules in ADHD</strong><br><a href="https://www.additudemag.com/daily-schedule-coronavirus-home-school/">https://www.additudemag.com/daily-schedule-coronavirus-home-school/</a></p><p> <strong>Excellent videos and cartoons to help explain the situation to kids</strong><br><a href="https://mailchi.mp/779134e78b2d/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates?fbclid=IwAR1v1GF4SX_h54UAeYreS63c8XFP_2L9pulsjcMXkvrl3sdlz5DmobbTOhc">https://mailchi.mp/779134e78b2d/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates?fbclid=IwAR1v1GF4SX_h54UAeYreS63c8XFP_2L9pulsjcMXkvrl3sdlz5DmobbTOhc</a></p><p> <strong>E-Learning for Children with Down Syndrome (American resources)</strong><br><a href="https://mailchi.mp/e5af25bdf396/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates-1348871?fbclid=IwAR0IHLwpc01hSxtKxCNedyEP5pf8Yv1o5WpySTaNgRFuCsaYLHtW7Z2vU4g">https://mailchi.mp/e5af25bdf396/covid-19-and-down-syndrome-updates-1348871?fbclid=IwAR0IHLwpc01hSxtKxCNedyEP5pf8Yv1o5WpySTaNgRFuCsaYLHtW7Z2vU4g</a></p><p> <strong>How to talk to your kids about Coronavirus</strong><br><a href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus">https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus</a></p><p> <strong>Autism Speaks Canada has a challenging behavior toolkit</strong><br><a href="https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/challenging-behaviors-tool-kit1/">https://www.autismspeaks.ca/science-services-resources/resources/tool-kits/challenging-behaviors-tool-kit1/</a></p><p> <strong>Visual schedules, reward systems and social stories</strong><br>Resources for special educators, therapists and families<br><a href="https://connectability.ca/2020/03/30/dealing-with-covid-19-resources-for-special-educators-therapists-families/">https://connectability.ca/2020/03/30/dealing-with-covid-19-resources-for-special-educators-therapists-families/</a></p><p>Visual support and schedules<br> <a href="https://www.kidsability.ca/uploads/Autism%20Services/AutismServices_VisualSupportsHandout.pdf">https://www.kidsability.ca/uploads/Autism%20Services/AutismServices_VisualSupportsHandout.pdf</a><br> <span><a href="https://www.naturalbeachliving.com/daily-visual-schedule/">https://www.naturalbeachliving.com/daily-visual-schedule/</a></span><br> <a href="https://adayinourshoes.com/free-printable-visual-schedules-for-home-and-daily-routines/">https://adayinourshoes.com/free-printable-visual-schedules-for-home-and-daily-routines/</a><br> <a href="https://www.sparklebox.co.uk/1801-1805/sb1801.html#.VQGfXI7F_1Z">https://www.sparklebox.co.uk/1801-1805/sb1801.html#.VQGfXI7F_1Z</a><br> <a href="https://do2learn.com/picturecards/VisualSchedules/index.htm">https://do2learn.com/picturecards/VisualSchedules/index.htm</a></p><p>Visual schedule maker<br><a href="https://connectability.ca/visuals-engine/">https://connectability.ca/visuals-engine/</a></p><p>Token Reward Systems<br><em>Explanation of a token system</em><br><a href="http://www.educateautism.com/token-economy.html">http://www.educateautism.com/token-economy.html</a><br><em>Examples of token systems</em><br><a href="https://www.earlywood.org/Page/558">https://www.earlywood.org/Page/558</a><br><a href="https://www.verywellfamily.com/create-a-token-economy-system-to-improve-child-behavior-1094888">https://www.verywellfamily.com/create-a-token-economy-system-to-improve-child-behavior-1094888</a></p><p>First/Then Boards – simple activity and reward system<br> <a href="https://www.erinoakkids.ca/ErinoakKids/files/f9/f9e82917-4dc7-40ca-901e-3a27591b2c0a.pdf">https://www.erinoakkids.ca/ErinoakKids/files/f9/f9e82917-4dc7-40ca-901e-3a27591b2c0a.pdf</a><br><a href="https://autismclassroomresources.com/visual-schedule-series-first-then/">https://autismclassroomresources.com/visual-schedule-series-first-then/</a><br><a href="https://www.tdsb.on.ca/Portals/0/Leadership/Ward12/AutismHandout_First-Then%20Strategy.pdf">https://www.tdsb.on.ca/Portals/0/Leadership/Ward12/AutismHandout_First-Then%20Strategy.pdf</a></p><p> <strong>Social Stories</strong><br> <em>Explanation of a social story</em><br> <a href="https://autismcanada.org/living-with-autism/treatments/non-medical/communication/social-stories/">https://autismcanada.org/living-with-autism/treatments/non-medical/communication/social-stories/</a><br> <em>COVID19 social stories</em><br> <a href="https://www.flipsnack.com/KeshetChicago/coronavirus-social-story/full-view.html">https://www.flipsnack.com/KeshetChicago/coronavirus-social-story/full-view.html</a><br> <a href="https://theautismeducator.ie/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/The-Corona-Virus-Free-Printable-Updated-2-The-Autism-Educator-.pdf">https://theautismeducator.ie/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/The-Corona-Virus-Free-Printable-Updated-2-The-Autism-Educator-.pdf</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Supporting_your_child_with_a_neurodevelopmental_disorder_through_the_COVID-19_crisis.jpgCOVID-19: Supporting your childMain

 

 

COVID-19: Frequently asked questionsCOVID-19: Frequently asked questionsCOVID-19: Frequently asked questionsCEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-07-06T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000065.20000000000002298.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>The COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing restrictions are impacting the well-being of caregivers and their children. Here are some of the common questions and concerns that caregivers have and some suggestions on how to cope with them.</p><p>The COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing restrictions are impacting the well-being of caregivers and their children. Different types of mental health support may be needed as we navigate the new realities imposed by COVID-19. Below are listed a collection of frequently asked COVID-19 mental health and well-being questions and answers. For some children and families, this guide along with our list of <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">online resources</a> may be enough. However, many families may need additional supports and are encouraged to reach out to their local mental health facilities and health-care providers before symptoms get worse.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The mental health and well-being of children and their caregivers are being negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.</li><li>Many families are struggling with similar issues. As a caregiver there are things you can do to help yourself and your children cope.</li><li>As a caregiver remember to take care of yourself and try taking just one day at a time.</li></ul> <h3>1. My child/teen is getting more upset as time goes on and wants to know when all of this will end.</h3><p>Many families are dealing with this issue. Here are some suggestions that might help.</p><ul><li>Listen to your child’s concerns and validate their feelings.</li><li>Emphasize the things that can be controlled such as following the recommendations from health officials. This includes <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">washing your hands</a> and social distancing.</li><li>Learn and use relaxation techniques such as <a href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">deep breathing</a> and taking time out for mindful meditation each day.</li><li>Establish and keep a routine. This provides stability, consistency and a sense of calm in a time of uncertainty.</li><li>Consider setting aside a special time each day to connect with your child. Spending quality time together can help ease <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=18&language=English">anxiety</a>, build relationships and overall contribute to a more positive day.</li><li>Manage your own anxiety. How you manage your own responses to this situation can set the tone for how your children respond. Take care of yourself and ask for help if needed.</li></ul><h3>2. We are experiencing more family conflict because we are always together now.</h3><p>Many families are struggling with this issue. It’s tough when everyone is home at once and space is limited. Here are some suggestions you can try.</p><ul><li>Talk with your family about expectations and set up a family schedule that is realistic and flexible. Consider how each person can get some time and space to themselves if needed.</li><li>Schedule positive family experiences such as playing board games together, cooking together, going for a walk, etc.</li><li>Implement a type of “pause” for when tensions run high where everyone is required to take a few minutes to cool down before continuing to discuss a heated issue.</li><li>Take time to look after yourself. Practice calming techniques, such as deep, relaxed breathing or mindfulness.</li></ul><h3>3. My child/teen is upset because special events such as graduation and prom are cancelled.</h3><p>Many young people are dealing with this issue, they are upset and their parents are upset. Here are some suggestions that might help.</p><ul><li>Listen. Just being there and offering to listen, even if you can’t fix the problem, can be comforting for your child.</li><li>Validate your child’s disappointment. You might say, “It’s totally natural to be angry about this, it really isn’t fair!” Then express confidence in their ability to persevere, adapt and rebound.</li><li>Help your child to feel good about all they have accomplished while looking forward to ways they can continue to grow, learn and achieve. For example, you might say, “You’ve worked really hard. I’m so proud of your efforts. I can’t wait to see what you are going to do next.”</li><li>Be creative and get planning! Brainstorm with your child other ways to mark achievements and celebrations.</li></ul><h3>4. I am having trouble dealing with my own stress and that makes me poor at handling my child’s stress.</h3><p>It is natural to feel extra stress at a time like this. It is important to realize the connection between your stress and your child’s stress. Just like in an airplane, it is important to ‘put on your own oxygen mask’ before trying to help someone else. Here are some ideas that might help.</p><ul><li>Focus on one thing at a time. Considering all your issues at once can be very stressful.</li><li>Get help with tasks where you can.</li><li>Acknowledge your stress and your feelings (e.g., “This is hard!”).</li><li>Be a kind coach to yourself (e.g., “I am not alone”, “This will pass”).</li><li>Find a few moments to relax your body (e.g., take a few slow breaths out, hold a warm cup of tea or take a warm shower or bath).</li><li>Talk with a supportive friend or family member.</li></ul><h3>5. My child’s/teen’s wake/sleep cycle is completely reversed or messed up. What should I do?</h3><p>Many families are struggling with this issue. Here are some suggestions that might help.</p><ul><li>Actively listen to your teen’s reasons for wanting to stay up late and acknowledge the pros (e.g., it's when many of their friends are talking, they have the house to themselves, they get uninterrupted time to do what they want, it matches their natural circadian rhythms, etc.)</li><li>Voice your concerns in a calm tone (e.g., lack of <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=645&language=English">quality sleep</a>, reduced energy for school and overall coping, impaired immune functioning, interference with their medical regimen/treatment, etc.)</li><li>Engage your teen collaboratively by gradually moving their bedtime by small amounts, closer to a healthier time. This often starts by implementing an earlier wake time and limiting naps so they are sleepy enough to fall asleep at the earlier time.</li><li>As part of your plan, ask your teen to help create a flexible family schedule that incorporates their new sleep guidelines. Include regular eating times, bathing and hygiene routines, work and break times, as well as pleasant activities for the entire family.</li></ul><h3>6. My child/teen is using screens way too much. What should I do about it?</h3><p>This is a concern that many families have. Here are some suggestions that may help.</p><ul><li>Discuss truthfully with your child why their usage has gone up. Make sure to listen to their reasons without judgement and then summarize (e.g., “I know I have periods of time when I need to focus on work and it sounds like you really value having time to connect with your friends online, so we are relying on our screens more than ever.”)</li><li>Discuss openly your concerns as well (e.g., “I’m worried that you are on screens so much that it is interfering with your sleep and mental health, and therefore with your overall health.”)</li><li>Collaborate to come up with a compromise or solution (e.g., “Let’s work together to figure out a way you can have time to connect with your friends (or play your favorite games) but also pay attention to your overall health.”)</li><li>As part of the collaboration, ask your child/teen to help create a flexible family schedule that includes many non-screen activities (e.g., walks, board games, etc.) as well as designated screen free times (e.g., mealtimes and/or 1 hour before bed).</li><li>Try not to be too hard on yourself – these are unusual times.</li></ul><h3>7. My child/teen has a previous mental health diagnosis and the COVID-19 pandemic has made it worse.</h3><p>The COVID-19 pandemic is making previous issues more challenging. Here are some suggestions that may help.</p><ul><li>Fundamentals are important. Make sure you have the basics of good mental health such as regular routines for sleep, eating, exercise and social contact in place.</li><li>Identify previous strategies. Think about what helped you to manage your child’s condition before the COVID-19 restrictions? Do you think these same strategies are being or can be utilized now?</li><li>Acknowledge the challenge. It is OK to say it is really tough and you’re working very hard.</li></ul><h3>8. We are okay but I am finding it very hard to work at home and keep the kids on track with school.</h3><p>This is a concern that many families have. Here are some suggestions that may help.</p><ul><li>Go easy on yourself. You’re essentially being asked to perform two full-time jobs.</li><li>Don’t expect to work at your normal capacity. Be proactive with your employer and co-workers on setting realistic expectations about what you can accomplish.</li><li>Negotiate a realistic school plan. Remember all kids are in the same boat. It’s not reasonable to expect full educational programming at home. Prioritize a few key areas. Let your child’s teacher know the different issues for your family (e.g., access to computers, parents working, etc.)</li><li>Create a flexible family schedule/routine. Set up regular sleep and eating times, encourage regular bathing and hygiene routines, set up work and break times, and plan for pleasant activities as a family.</li><li>Expect more than usual screen time for your children but also schedule in plenty of non-screen activities (e.g., exercise, cooking with you, playing board games as a family, etc.)</li></ul><h3>9. I am feeling more overwhelmed by my child/teen's medical condition/disability during these times.</h3><p>It is OK to feel more overwhelmed or stressed. This is a normal response to such an unsettled time. Here are some suggestions that may be helpful.</p><ul><li>Remember to be kind to yourself.</li><li>Reflect on what has helped during other difficult times related to your child’s health.</li><li>Identify what is easily controllable and what is not controllable right now.</li><li>Consider simplifying your routine or your child’s routine to make it more efficient or easier to manage. Your medical team may be able to assist you with this.</li><li>Delegate some important tasks to other family members or supports if at all possible.</li><li>Pace yourself. Figure out what is most important, focus on that first and give yourself permission to lower your standards for less important things (e.g., how clean your house is).</li></ul><h3>10. I am having trouble convincing my teen to observe social distancing mandates.</h3><p>You are more likely to be heard by your teen if you take a calm approach. Allow your teen to express their point of view first. Try and express interest and understanding of your teen’s view, even if you don’t agree with it. Here are some more tips that may help.</p><ul><li>Listen and then clarify what your child says, (e.g., “It sounds like you really want to be close with your friends and that is totally natural.”)</li><li>State your own position clearly (e.g., “And in this situation with COVID-19, I am concerned that you and your friends, and all our families are at risk.”)</li><li>Suggest a compromise or solution (e.g., “How about we figure out a way for you to talk with your friends that is still safe?”)</li></ul><h3>11. I am feeling anxious about my financial situation and this is impacting my family/parenting/functioning.</h3><p>This is a very challenging time and you are not alone. Here are some suggestions that might help.</p><ul><li>Try to focus on one day at a time.</li><li>Do some direct problem solving on one thing at a time (e.g., consulting government financial aid web sites, contact credit card companies and/or your landlord for extensions etc.) but take emotional breaks often.</li><li>Find time for self-care by doing things such as taking a 10-minute walk outside, meditating, having a bath or talking to a supportive friend or family member.</li></ul><h3>12. My kids are getting bored and I don’t know how to help them.</h3><p>It is normal that kids may experience boredom as they aren’t busy with the same activities as usual. Boredom is not necessarily a bad thing although it can be frustrating for everyone. Here are some ideas to deal with boredom.</p><ul><li>Work with your child to create a schedule/daily routine. Make sure your child is aware of what the daily schedule includes and is part of the process to create it.</li><li>Given the COVID-19 restrictions may be in place for some time, it will be important to re-assess this schedule frequently to ensure your child is still interested in the daily activities.</li><li>Try to include multiple types of activities in a day for variation. For example, physical activity, connecting with friends online or by phone, board games, crafts, quiet time, family time, etc. These different activities should be based on your child’s interests.</li><li>Consider making a free time to-do list with a list of activities that your child can do independently when they find themselves without a planned or scheduled activity. For example, you might include activities such as reading a book, starting a new puzzle, organizing their room, calling a friend, cleaning their desk, playing outside, colouring, etc.</li><li>See if you and your child can approach common activities with a new level of curiosity, a new twist and/or a closer look (e.g., “What if we pretended we landed from Mars and didn’t know what this was? What would we notice?”)</li><li>Don’t be afraid to ask around. Reach out to other parents and encourage your child to reach out to other kids to get ideas on how to stay active and busy.</li></ul><h3>13. My kids are starting to worry about our health and finances and I don’t want this to add to their stress.</h3><p>Children can often sense the stress of their parents and frequently worry about the family’s well-being. In addition, health and financial concerns are being highlighted in the media and in our daily conversations. Here are some ideas on how to support your child around this.</p><ul><li>Reassure your child that you are doing everything you can to look after your own health and taking all necessary precautions to stay healthy.</li><li>Reassure your child that the current situation is temporary and that you are accessing the proper supports to financially manage at this time.</li><li>Always be honest and provide age-appropriate information.</li><li>Try to avoid watching the news with your child.</li><li>Take your child’s lead in these conversations. Provide small pieces of information and wait for your child to ask further questions.</li><li>Seek support if you need it. There are several government programs that can help assist during this time. See the article called <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a> for some suggestions.</li></ul><p>For parents and caregivers at SickKids there are additional resources available such as workshops on emotion regulation and resiliency, and a virtual brief therapy clinic. To find out more about these resources visit the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/coronavirus">SickKids Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information</a> page.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19--Frequently-asked_questions.jpgFind answers to some of the common questions and concerns that caregivers have and some suggestions on how to cope with them. Main
COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resourcesCOVID-19: Well-being and mental health resourcesCOVID-19: Well-being and mental health resourcesCEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-07-06T04:00:00Z11.500000000000035.8000000000000448.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>The COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing restrictions are impacting the well-being of caregivers and their children. Below are some suggested online resources to provide information and to help parents and caregivers cope.</p><p>The COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing restrictions are impacting the well-being of caregivers and their children. Different types of mental health support may be needed as we navigate the new realities imposed by COVID-19. Below are listed a series of online resources to help parents and caregivers cope.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The mental health and well-being of children and their caregivers are being negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.</li><li>Find a list of online information and resources to help parents and caregivers cope.</li></ul> <h2>Kids Help Phone</h2><p>Canada’s only 24/7 national support service. It offers professional counselling, information and referrals, and volunteer-led, text-based support for young people in both English and French.<br> <strong>Website:</strong> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">https://kidshelpphone.ca/</a><br> <strong>Call:</strong> 1-800-668-6868<br> <strong>Text CONNECT</strong> to 686868</p><h2>General resources on coping and parenting during COVID-19</h2><ul><li> <strong>AboutKidsHealth</strong><br> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/</a></li> <li> <strong>Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health</strong><br> <a href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/</a></li><li> <strong>Society of Pediatric Psychology</strong><br> <a href="https://societyofpediatricpsychology.org/content/resources-covid-19">https://societyofpediatricpsychology.org/content/resources-covid-19</a></li><li> <strong>Zero to Three</strong><br> <a href="https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/3210-tips-for-families-coronavirus">https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/3210-tips-for-families-coronavirus</a></li><li> <strong>PBS KIDS for Parents</strong><br> <a href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus">https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus</a></li><li> <strong>Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK)</strong><br> <a href="https://rockonline.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Resource-Kit-for-Families-COVID-19-Ages-0-6-Part-1_Updated-March-27.pdf">https://rockonline.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Resource-Kit-for-Families-COVID-19-Ages-0-6-Part-1_Updated-March-27.pdf</a></li><li> <strong>Reach Out Centre for Kids (ROCK)</strong><br> <a href="https://rockonline.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Resources-for-Families-during-COVID-19_April-9.pdf">https://rockonline.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Resources-for-Families-during-COVID-19_April-9.pdf</a></li><li> <strong>World Health Organization</strong><br> <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/healthy-parenting">https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/healthy-parenting</a></li><li> <strong>Child Mind Institute</strong><br> <a href="https://childmind.org/coping-during-covid-19-resources-for-parents/">https://childmind.org/coping-during-covid-19-resources-for-parents/</a></li><li> <strong>School’s Out - A Parent’s Guide for Meeting the Challenge During the COVID-19 Pandemic</strong><br> <a href="https://nyulangone.org/news/schools-out-parents-guide-meeting-challenge-during-covid-19-pandemic">https://nyulangone.org/news/schools-out-parents-guide-meeting-challenge-during-covid-19-pandemic</a></li><li> <strong>Pandemic Parenting Playbook</strong><br> <a href="https://cheo.echoontario.ca/parent-caregiver-sessions/">https://cheo.echoontario.ca/parent-caregiver-sessions/</a></li><li> <strong>COVIDwithKIDS: A Toolkit for Coping with Kids at Home During the COVID-19 Pandemic</strong><br> <a href="https://www.covidwithkids.org/">https://www.covidwithkids.org/</a></li></ul><h2>General health resource hub</h2><ul><li> <strong>Meant2Prevent</strong><br> <a href="https://meant2prevent.ca/">https://meant2prevent.ca/</a><br> This resource contains links to reliable sites on the topics of nutrition, mental health, physical activity, sleep and parenting. It also has a special COVID-19 section. There is also a Meant2Prevent kitchen with great recipe ideas. You can also follow them on Instagram or Facebook.</li></ul><h2>Information on anxiety and coping strategies</h2><ul><li> <strong>Anxiety Canada</strong><br> <a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/">https://www.anxietycanada.com/</a></li><li> <strong>AboutKidsHealth</strong><br> <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=18&language=english">https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=18&language=english</a></li><li> <strong>Tolerance for Uncertainty: A COVID-19 Workbook by Dr. Sachiko Nagasawa & Assoc.</strong><br><a href="https://www.baypsychology.ca/workshops">https://www.baypsychology.ca/workshops</a></li></ul><h2>Mental health mobile apps</h2><ul><li>MindShift CBT (Anxiety Canada)</li><li>AnxietyCoach (Mayo Clinic)</li><li>Breathe, think, do with Sesame Street</li><li>Stop Breathe & Think</li><li>Smiling Mind</li><li>Headspace</li><li>Virtual Hope Box</li></ul><h2>Mindfulness supports</h2><ul><li> <strong>Free guided meditations</strong><br> <a href="https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/mindful-meditations">https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/mindful-meditations</a></li><li> <strong>Breath In & Shine: Mindfulness for Children and Families</strong><br> <a href="http://mindfulfamilies.ca/index.php/mindful-families-programs-workshops-and-presentations/breathe-in-and-shine">http://mindfulfamilies.ca/index.php/mindful-families-programs-workshops-and-presentations/breathe-in-and-shine</a></li><li> <strong>Youth Mindfulness Kids Programme</strong><br> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=At5h-dsIO7w">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=At5h-dsIO7w</a></li><li> <strong>Cosmic Kids Yoga</strong><br> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/CosmicKidsYoga">https://www.youtube.com/user/CosmicKidsYoga</a></li></ul><h2>Mental health support for adults</h2><ul><li> <strong>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)</strong><br> <a href="https://www.camh.ca/500.html?aspxerrorpath=/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">https://www.camh.ca/500.html?aspxerrorpath=/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19</a></li></ul><h2>Financial supports</h2><ul><li> <strong>Canada Emergency Response Benefit</strong><br> <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/services/benefits/ei/cerb-application.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/services/benefits/ei/cerb-application.html</a></li><li> <strong>Ontario: Support for Families</strong><br> <a href="https://www.iaccess.gov.on.ca/FamilyAppWeb/public/index.xhtml">https://www.iaccess.gov.on.ca/FamilyAppWeb/public/index.xhtml</a></li><li> <strong>Ontario: COVID 19 Support for people</strong><br> <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/covid-19-support-people#section-0">https://www.ontario.ca/page/covid-19-support-people#section-0</a></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19--Well-being_and_mental_health_resources.jpgA list of suggested online resources to provide information and to help parents and caregivers cope during COVID-19. Main
COVID-19 and chronic pain in children and teensCOVID-19 and chronic pain in children and teensCOVID-19 and chronic pain in children and teensCEnglishInfectious Diseases;Pain/AnaesthesiaChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-05-26T04:00:00Z9.4000000000000053.20000000000001219.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children and teens with chronic pain may find their pain symptoms are getting worse during the COVID-19 pandemic. This may be due to increased amounts of stress and the decreased levels of physical activity.</p><p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3872&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19</a> is an infection caused by the coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2. It is a respiratory virus which spreads mainly through close contact with an infected person.</p><p>Symptoms of COVID-19 may include <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=774&language=English">cough</a>, fatigue, body aches, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headache</a>, nausea, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> as well as loss of taste or smell. Children and teens with chronic pain who have COVID-19 may find their pain symptoms get worse.</p><p>Treatment for COVID-19 should involve treating the symptoms of the infection and the chronic pain.</p><h2>Chronic pain, stress and COVID-19</h2><p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3867&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Stress</a> can change how your child or teen experiences painful sensations. COVID-19 can be stressful due to things such as being separated from family and friends, being out of a regular routine and worrying about oneself or loved ones. Many children and teens are feeling stressed or worried about COVID-19. This can increase their sensitivity to pain experiences, especially for those with <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2983&language=English&hub=chronicpain#pain">chronic pain</a>. Children and teens are also getting less physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic and this can increase their sensitivity to pain experiences. Although it may be challenging to reduce the amount of stress and worry, while at the same time increasing levels of physical activity, it is more important than ever to do this. Your child or teen can use various strategies for managing pain, such as:</p><ul><li>mind-body strategies</li><li>physical strategies</li><li>medications</li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>For children and teens with chronic pain, the increase in stress and a decrease in physical activity, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, can cause their pain symptoms to be worse.</li><li>For children and teens with COVID-19 and chronic pain, treatment should involve treating the symptoms of both the infection and the chronic pain.</li><li>Strategies to manage pain include mind-body strategies, physical strategies and medications.</li><li>There are different types of pain (nociceptive, neuropathic and nociplastic) and they are treated with different types of medications.</li></ul> <h2>Mind-body strategies</h2><p>Mind-body strategies are often called coping skills or strategies. Coping involves using skills or strategies to manage stressful experiences. Ways of coping come in all shapes and sizes. Some examples of coping skills and strategies include distraction, self-soothing strategies, and mindfulness.</p><p>Children and teens living with chronic pain may find it harder to use coping skills and strategies for managing pain during the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, many children and teens may feel isolated from their peers. This can increase their feelings of stress and decrease their motivation to use coping skills. It can be helpful to develop creative coping skills and strategies to increase your child’s or teen’s motivation for using these strategies.</p><p> <strong>Distraction</strong> involves keeping your thoughts and attention focused on something pleasant or enjoyable when experiencing pain or when feeling stressed. Distraction strategies will be different for everyone. Some people like reading a book and some like spending time outdoors. Be creative and give one of these a try!</p><ul><li>Make a play list of your favourite songs.</li><li>Think of funny stories or memories.</li><li>Write a story where you are the main character and ask someone else to make up an ending to the story.</li><li>Text, call or have a video chat with a friend or family member.</li><li>Write down your thoughts and feelings in a journal.</li><li>Use a search-and-find book.</li><li>Read a favourite book.</li><li>Watch your favourite TV show or movie.</li><li>Spend time drawing, painting or completing a craft activity.</li></ul><p> <strong>Self-soothing</strong> involves using strategies to calm yourself. Think of what brings you comfort and try to use it when you are feeling stressed or upset. If you need some ideas, give one of these a try!</p><ul><li>Relax your body from your head to your toes.</li><li>Try belly or four-square breathing.</li><li>Use positive self-statements. For example, I am strong and I can do this!</li><li>Take a mental vacation. For example, imagine your favourite place and who would be there with you.</li><li>Create pictures in your mind. Think of your favourite animal, sports game or family holiday, and imagine these things in your mind. Think of all the details, imagine the smells and the sounds.</li></ul> <p><strong>Mindfulness</strong> involves directing your attention to the present moment. There are many different types of mindfulness activities that you can try. Practice mindful walking, eating or listening.</p><h2>Physical strategies</h2><p>For children and teens living with chronic pain, regular physical activity is extremely important. Although it may be harder to engage in physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many creative ways to stay physically active!</p><p>Check out the <a href="https://www.participaction.com/en-ca/blog/15-ways-for-you--your-family-to-stay-active-at-home">ParticipACTION</a> website for creative ideas when exercising at home!</p><h2>Medications</h2><p><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/pain?topic=painrelief">Medications</a> are one of the strategies that may be used when treating chronic pain. Medications are rarely used alone for managing chronic pain. They are most effective when used in combination with mind-body and physical strategies.</p><p>Pain medications are used to help with:</p><ul><li>Improving your child’s or teen’s level of functioning.</li><li>Improving quality of life for your child or teen, and the entire family.</li><li>Managing pain when used in combination with both mind-body and physical strategies.</li></ul><h2>COVID-19 and medications</h2><p>Health Canada recommends the use of either <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> to reduce fever for children over 6 months of age who are infected with COVID-19.</p><p>At the beginning of the pandemic, there were recommendations for those diagnosed with COVID-19 to avoid the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (<a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=2998&language=English">NSAIDs</a>) such as <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a>. However, the current recommendations are that it is safe to use NSAIDs for those diagnosed with COVID-19 with fever.</p><p>If your child to teen is taking any of these medications to manage chronic pain, do not stop taking them before consulting your health-care provider.</p><p>Read this <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3653&language=English">article</a> to find more information about medications for chronic pain, or consult your pharmacist or clinic nurse.</p><h2>Types of pain and medications used to treat it</h2><h3>Nociceptive pain</h3><p>This type of pain often results from activation of pain receptors in the body. Injury or inflammation in different areas of the body can result in this type of pain. For example, sprains, broken bones, muscle strains from exercise can all cause nociceptive pain.</p><p>Examples of over the counter medications for nociceptive pain include:</p><ul><li>Acetaminophen</li><li>Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen</li><li>Topical medications such as topical diclofenac</li></ul><h3>Neuropathic pain</h3><p>This rare type of pain occurs when there is damage to the nerves (the pain signalling pathways of the body). For example, medications for certain cancer treatments, nerve injuries at birth and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can all cause neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain can cause painful sensations such as tingling, burning, electrical or pins and needles.</p><p>Examples of medications prescribed for neuropathic pain:</p><ul><li>Gabapentin</li><li>Amitriptyline</li><li>Nortriptyline</li><li>Duloxetine</li></ul><h3>Nociplastic pain</h3><p>This type of pain occurs when the nervous system becomes very sensitive and it is often referred to as primary pain. It is sometimes seen in children with irritable bowel syndrome or after they experience a minor injury or infection.</p><p>This kind of pain is sometimes treated with one of more of the types of medications listed above, depending on the specific symptoms and circumstances.</p><h3>Opioids</h3><p>Opioids are a group of medications (morphine, hydromorphone, and oxycodone) that are rarely used for treating chronic pain. If you are taking an opioid and have an infection causing fever, cough, diarrhea or vomiting, let your doctor know you are taking this medication. If you are not sure how to monitor and recognize the side effects of taking an opioid such as sedation, constipation, nausea and dizziness, then talk to your doctor or clinic nurse.</p><h2>When to seek medical attention</h2><p>If you are concerned about your child’s or teen’s health, contact your child’s primary health-care provider or Telehealth Ontario (1-866-797-0000). In case of an emergency seek immediate medical attention.</p><h2>Clinical visits during COVID-19</h2><p>To decrease the risk of spreading the COVID-19 infection, the SickKids Chronic Pain clinic is offering virtual clinic appointments for new and follow-up patients. These appointments can be done either by video conferencing or telephone.</p> <h2>Informational Videos</h2><ul><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7wfDenj6CQ">How does your brain respond to pain</a></li><li><a href="http://www.aci.health.nsw.gov.au/chronic-pain/painbytes">Seven video mini-series on chronic pain and its management for youth (Pain Bytes)</a></li><li><a href="https://www.mycarepath.ca/understanding-pain/brain-and-nervous-system-change">Video explaining the power of the brain and chronic pain</a></li><li><a href="https://www.mycarepath.ca/managing-pain/paced-practiced-and-increasing-activities">Video describing pacing</a></li></ul><h2>Mind-Body Apps and Resources</h2><ul><li><a href="https://www.seattlechildrens.org/globalassets/documents/research/cchbd/webmap_mobile_app_flyer.pdf">WebMAP</a></li><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday Mindfulness</a></li><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jaNAwy3XsfI&t=14s">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li><a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/general/how-to-chill/?_ga=2.19846392.1512373918.1588607938-1627176544.1588607938">Anxiety Canada – How to Chill</a></li></ul> <h2>Resources for pediatric pain management</h2><ul><li><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3653&language=English&hub=chronicpain#pain">How to treat and manage chronic pain</a></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19_and_chronic_pain_in_children_and_teens.jpgLearn about how to help children and teens with chronic pain cope during the COVID-19 pandemic, and which medications are used to treat chronic pain.Main
LearningLearningLearningLEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Helpful information for parents to help their child get the most out of school. Learn about academic milestones, bullying and how different types of health conditions and learning disabilities may affect your child at school.</p>​<p>Starting school allows children to build on the skills they have already started developing at home. Find information for parents to help their child get the most out of school, both in and out of the classroom. Learn about academic milestones for children and what you can do to help your child. Find information about how different health conditions and learning disabilities may affect your child at school. Also find resources about bullying and download some tip sheets for parents about bullying in young children.<br></p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuXbgK4LObxQVt1sgxcE-L5r" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><p>For more videos from SickKids experts in collaboration with Youngster, visit <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoKMd2cYwegtZX19uHdNLQA">Youngster on YouTube</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Academic milestones in children</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn about some typical milestones for children and what to look out for if you suspect your child is not meeting these milestones. Remember that not all children learn at the same pace.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Milestones</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=711&language=English">Cognitive development in school-age children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=720&language=English">Phonological awareness: What sounds your child can recognize at different ages</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=651&language=English">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3871&language=English">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=722&language=English">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=732&language=English">Speech and language milestones</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>When to worry</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=725&language=English">Phonological awareness: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=729&language=English">Reading problems: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=724&language=English">Mathematics: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=734&language=English">Speech and language: When to worry</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Boosting your child's academic skills</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Discover what you can do to help your child meet typical milestones. Also find some resources that may help you and your child. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Reading and writing skills</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=729&language=English">Reading problems: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1903&language=English">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1881&language=English">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=730&language=English">Reading and writing resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=735&language=English">Writing and printing resources</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Math skills</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=724&language=English">Mathematics: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=721&language=English">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=649&language=English">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=648&language=English">Financial literacy: Teaching kids about money</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=723&language=English">Mathematics resources</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Speech and language skills</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=734&language=English">Speech and language: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=731&language=English">Speech and language problems: How to help your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=733&language=English">Speech and language: Resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=725&language=English">Phonological awareness: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=726&language=English">Phonological problems: How to help your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=727&language=English">Phonological problems: Resources</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Bullying</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>School or day care is one of the places that bullying may occur. Learn about the different types of bullying, what to look out for and how to help your child. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=303&language=English">Bullying</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=632&language=English">Facial difference: Confronting the challenges of bullying</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=736&language=English">Cyberbullying part one</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=737&language=English">Cyberbullying part two</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=738&language=English">Cyberbullying: Talking to your children</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Helping your child with special needs at school</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Children with health conditions may need special consideration at school. Learn what you need to communicate to your child's school or day care. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Health conditions at school</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1489&language=English">Asthma in school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1410&language=English">Brain tumour diagnosis and advocating for your child in school </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=650&language=English">Congenital heart defects: Information for teachers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1113&language=English">Eczema: School and activities </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2112&language=English">Epilepsy and learning </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2116&language=English">Epilepsy at school </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=652&language=English">Sickle cell disease: A practical guide for teachers</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Learning difficulties at school</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1999&language=English">ADHD: Communicating with your child's school </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=307&language=English">Dyslexia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=653&language=English">Learning disabilities: Overview</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Information for teachers</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>If you are a teacher you may be faced with the extra challenge of having a child with a health condition in your classroom. Here is some information that may help you. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=650&language=English">Congenital heart defects: Information for teachers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=652&language=English">Sickle cell disease: A practical guide for teachers</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/learning_and_education_landing_page.jpglearninglearning,healthylivingLearn about academic milestones, bullying and how different types of health conditions and learning disabilities may affect your child at school. Main