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Mastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionMMastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionMastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionEnglishOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)EarsNervous systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZDenise Kipling, RN, BScN;Charlotte Cormack-Jones, RN, BScN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Blake Papsin, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FACS, FAAP6.0000000000000076.00000000000001146.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A mastoidectomy is surgery to remove a part of the bone behind a child's ear. Learn about what to expect during the operation and follow up treatment.</p><p>Your child needs an operation to take away part of the bone from behind the ear. This operation is called a mastoidectomy (say: MAST-oid-ECK-toe-mee). This operation will be performed by an otolaryngology (say OH-toe-lar-ing-olo-gee) doctor. </p><p>This brochure explains what will happen during the operation and how to care for your child at home. Use this information to explain to your child what will happen, using words they can understand. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A mastoidectomy is an operation to take away part of the bone from behind the ear.</li> <li>A mastoidectomy is done because of an infection or cholesteatoma that spreads to the mastoid bone.</li> <li>Your child will need an operation to remove the diseased part of the mastoid bone.</li> <li>Your child will need to have an anaesthetic. Your child will need to stay overnight in the hospital after the procedure.</li> </ul><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>These are signs that there is a problem:</p> <ul> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher</li> <li>blood or fluid leaking from the ear for more than two days </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li>redness or swelling around the ear and the incision </li> <li>the packing falls out of the ear </li> </ul> <p>If your child has any of these signs, call your child's otolaryngologist, the otolaryngology clinic, or your family doctor right away. </p> <p>If this is an emergency, or if you are concerned about your child's condition, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department right away. </p><h2>Why a mastoidectomy is needed</h2><p>The bone behind the ear is called the mastoid bone (say: MAST-oid).</p><p>Your child may need a mastoidectomy because of one of these problems in the mastoid bone:</p><ul><li>infection</li><li>cholesteatoma</li></ul><h3>Infection</h3><p>The mastoid bone contains hollow spaces called air cells. The air cells are connected to the middle ear, which is the part of the ear behind the eardrum. Sometimes, infections in the middle ear can spread to the air cells in the mastoid bone.</p><p>If your child has too many infections in the mastoid bone, the bone can become soft. If this happens, that part of the bone must be taken away. Taking away the diseased part of the bone does these things:</p><ul><li>It stops the spread of infection.</li><li>Sometimes the hearing is slightly poorer after the surgery but the procedure stops any more damage to the ear and to your child's hearing.</li></ul><h3>Cholesteatoma</h3><p>A cholesteatoma (say: KOE-less-tee-uh-TOE-ma) is a growth in the middle ear. Layers of skin build up in the middle ear. If a cholesteatoma gets too big, it can damage your child's ear or their hearing.</p><p>If your child has a cholesteatoma, they may have some or all of these symptoms:</p><ul><li>bad-smelling fluid leaking from the ear</li><li>full feeling in the ear</li><li>pressure in the ear</li><li>loss of hearing</li></ul><p>These symptoms can also be caused by other problems. Your child may need to take several tests to find out what is causing the symptoms.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Cholesteatoma</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Cholesteatoma_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the cholesteatoma, middle ear and ear drum" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A cholesteatoma is a growth of skin in the part of the ear behind the ear drum (the middle ear). This growth is like a cyst that builds up layers of skin in the middle ear.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A cholesteatoma can spread into the mastoid bone. If this happens, your child will need a mastoidectomy to stop any more damage to your child's ear or their hearing. Sometimes, removing the cholesteatoma may make the hearing slightly worse but often not enough for the child to notice.</p><h2>The operation takes about three hours</h2><p>Your child will have a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthetic</a>. This will make sure that they sleep during the operation and do not feel any pain. </p><p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon will do the operation. An otolaryngologist (say OH-toe-lar-ing-olo-gist) is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ear, nose and throat. </p><p>The doctor makes a cut behind the ear and takes out the affected mastoid bone. Then the doctor stitches the skin closed. The doctor may put a drain behind the ear to stop fluid and blood from collecting around the cut. This drain will be taken out before your child goes home from the hospital. </p><p>The operation takes about three hours.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">Mastoidectomy</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Mastoidectomy_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Incision line over mastoid bone on side of head and close-up of bone with mastoid air cells and with air cells removed" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> mastoid bone is located in the skull just behind the ear. When a mastoidectomy is performed, the air cells in the mastoid bone are removed.</figcaption></figure><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>After the operation, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post Anesthetic Care Unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in PACU for about one hour. We will then move your child to a room on the nursing unit. </p> <p>You will be able to see your child as soon as they are fully awake. A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child. </p> <p>Your child will have an intravenous tube (IV) in their arm. We will give your child medicine and fluids through the IV until they can drink easily. </p> <p>Your child may have a gauze bandage on their ear or around their head. Your child's doctor will take the bandage off the day after the operation. If your child has a drain, the doctor will remove it at the same time. </p> <p>Your child's ear may also be packed with a ribbon or sponge pack which will be taken out during a clinic visit after the operation.</p> <h3>Your child may feel dizzy</h3> <p>Your child may feel dizzy after the operation. You or another adult should be with your child when they get out of bed on the day of the surgery. </p> <h3>Taking care of your child's pain</h3> <p>If your child has pain after the operation, we will give them pain medicine, either through the IV tube in their arm or by a pill or liquid to swallow. You know your child best. If you think your child is in pain, tell the nurse. </p> <h3>Eating and drinking</h3> <p>Your child will probably ask for sips of water two to three hours after the operation. After your child can drink, we will start adding their usual food. </p> <h3>Your child will stay in the hospital overnight</h3> <p>You will be able to stay overnight with your child in their room.</p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. </p> <p>Write this information down here:</p> <ul> <li>The date and time of the operation: </li> <li>When your child must stop eating: </li> <li>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids: </li> <li>Other things to remember: </li> </ul>
Mastoïdectomie pour soigner un cholestéatome ou une infection de l'oreilleMMastoïdectomie pour soigner un cholestéatome ou une infection de l'oreilleMastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionFrenchOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)EarsNervous systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZDenise Kipling, RN, BScN;Charlotte Cormack-Jones, RN, BScN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Blake Papsin, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FACS, FAAP6.0000000000000076.00000000000001146.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>La mastoïdectomie est une opération qui consiste à retirer une partie de l'os qui se trouve derrière l'oreille.</p><p>Votre enfant doit se faire opérer pour que l'on retire une partie de l'os qui se situe derrière l'oreille. On appelle cette opération mastoïdectomie. Cette opération sera faite par un otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL).</p> <p>Cet article explique ce qui se passera pendant l'opération et comment prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison. Vous pourrez vous servir de ces renseignements pour expliquer à votre enfant ce qui se passera, en utilisant des mots qu'il peut comprendre.</p><h2>À retenir<br></h2><ul><li> Une mastoïdectomie est une intervention chirurgicale au cours de laquelle on retire une partie de l’os qui se situe derrière l’oreille.</li><li> On effectue une mastoïdectomie pour soigner une infection ou un cholestéatome qui s’est propagé à la mastoïde.</li><li> Votre enfant devra se faire opérer pour enlever la partie atteinte de la mastoïde.</li><li> Votre enfant devra être mis sous anesthésie et devra passer la nuit à l’hôpital après l’intervention. </li></ul><h2>Quand appeler le mé​decin</h2> <p>Voici des signes qu'il y a un problème :</p> <ul><li>fièvre de 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus;</li> <li>sang ou liquide qui coule de l'oreille pendant plus de 2jours;</li> <li>vomissements qui n'arrêtent pas;</li> <li>douleur qui empire;</li> <li>rougeur ou enflure autour de l'oreille et de l'incision;</li> <li>le ruban ou l'éponge tombe de l'oreille.</li></ul> <p>Si votre enfant montre l'un ou l'autre de ces signes, appelez l'ORL de votre enfant, la clinique d'otorhinolaryngologie ou votre médecin de famille immédiatement.</p> <p>S'il s'agit d'une urgence ou si l'état de votre enfant vous inquiète, n'attendez pas et rendez-vous au service d'urgence le plus près immédiatement.​</p><h2>Pourquoi on doit faire une mastoïdectomie</h2><p>L'os derrière l'oreille s'appelle la mastoïde ou encore processus ou apophyse mastoïde.</p><p>Votre enfant peut avoir besoin d'une mastoïdectomie à cause de l'un de ces problèmes :</p><ul><li>infection</li><li>cholestéatome</li></ul><h3>Inf​ection</h3><p>La mastoïde contient des cavités creuses appelées cavités aériennes. Les cavités aériennes sont liées à l'oreille moyenne, la partie de l'oreille qui se situe derrière le tympan. Parfois, des infections de l'oreille moyenne peuvent se propager dans les cavités aériennes jusqu'à la mastoïde.</p><p>Si votre enfant a trop d'infections dans la mastoïde, elle peut devenir molle. Dans ce cas, cette partie de l'os doit être enlevée. En retirant la partie malade de l'os, on peut :</p><ul><li>mettre fin à la propagation de l'infection.</li><li>parfois, l'ouïe est un peu moins bonne après l'opération, mais l'intervention évite que l'oreille et l'ouïe de votre enfant ne soit plus abîmées.</li></ul><h3>Cholestéatom​e</h3><p>Un cholestéatome est une masse derrière l'oreille moyenne. Des couches de peau s'accumulent dans l'oreille moyenne, et si un cholestéatome devient trop gros, il peut endommager l'oreille ou l'ouïe de votre enfant.</p><p>Si votre enfant a un cholestéatome, il peut présenter la totalité ou une partie de ces symptômes :</p><ul><li>écoulement nauséabond de l'oreille;</li><li>sentiment que l'oreille est « pleine »;</li><li>pression dans l'oreille;</li><li>perte de l'ouïe.</li></ul><p>Ces symptômes peuvent aussi être causés par d'autres problèmes. Votre enfant pourrait devoir subir plusieurs tests pour voir quelle est la cause des symptômes.</p><p>Un cholestéatome peut se propager dans la mastoïde. Si cela se produit, votre enfant aura besoin d'une mastoïdectomie pour éviter que son oreille ou son ouïe ne soient un peu plus abîmées. Parfois, le retrait du cholestéatome peut faire perde un peu d'ouïe, mais si peu que souvent l'enfant ne s'en rend pas compte.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Cholestéatome</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Cholesteatoma_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="L’emplacement du cholestéatome, de l’oreille moyenne et du tympan" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Un cholestéatome est une masse de peau qui se forme dans la partie de l'oreille située derrière le tympan (l'oreille moyenne). Cette excroissance ressemble à un kyste. Elle accumule des couches de peau dans l'oreille moyenne.</figcaption></figure><h2>L'opération dure environ 3 heures</h2><p>On administrera à votre enfant un médicament spécial pour le faire dormir, appelé anesthésie générale. Votre enfant dormira pendant l' opération et qu' il ne ressentira aucune douleur.</p><p>Un otorhinolaryngologiste/spécialiste de la tête et du cou fera l'opération. Un otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL) est un médecin spécialiste de l'oreille, du nez et de la gorge.</p><p>Le médecin coupe derrière l'oreille et retire la mastoïde malade. Le médecin referme ensuite la peau avec des points de suture. Il pourrait placer un drain derrière l'oreille pour empêche le liquide et le sang de s'accumuler autour de l'incision. Ce drain sera retiré avant que l'enfant ne retourne à la maison.</p><p>L'opération prend environ 3 heures.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Mastoïdectomie</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Mastoidectomy_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Ligne d’inclinaison sur la mastoïde et un gros plan sur l’os avec cellules mastoïdiennes et avec cellules retirées" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">La mastoïde est un os situé dans le crâne, juste derrière l'oreille. Lorsque l'on procède à une mastoïdectomie, on retire les cavités aériennes de la mastoïde.</figcaption></figure><h2>Après l'opérat​ion</h2><p>Après l'opération, on conduira votre enfant vers la salle de réveil, aussi appelée unité de soins postopératoires. C'est là que votre enfant se réveillera. Il demeurera dans en salle de réveil environ 1 heure. Il sera ensuite transféré dans une chambre de l'unité de soins.</p><p>Vous pourrez voir votre enfant aussitôt qu'il sera complètement réveillé. Un bénévole de la salle d'attente du bloc opératoire vous conduira vers votre enfant.</p><p>Votre enfant aura un tube intraveineux (IV) dans le bras. Nous donnerons des médicaments et des liquides à votre enfant par l'IV, jusqu'à ce qu'il puisse boire facilement.</p><p>Votre enfant pourrait avoir un pansement de gaze sur l'oreille ou autour de la tête. Le médecin retirera le pansement la journée qui suivra l'opération. Si votre enfant a un drain, il sera retiré à ce moment.</p><p>L'oreille de votre enfant peut aussi avoir été remplie d'un ruban ou d'une éponge, qui sera retiré au moment d'une visite à la clinque après l'opération.</p><h3>Votre enfant pourrait se sentir éto​urdi</h3><p>Votre enfant pourrait se sentir étourdi après l'opération. Vous ou un autre adulte devriez être avec votre enfant quand il sortira du lit la journée de l'opération.</p><h3>Prendre la douleur de votre enfant en charge</h3><p>Si votre enfant ressent de la douleur après l'opération, nous lui donnerons des médicaments contre la douleur, soit au moyen du tube IV dans son bras, soit au moyen d'une pilule ou d'un liquide à avaler. C'est vous qui connaissez le mieux votre enfant. Si vous pensez que votre enfant a mal, dites-le à l'infirmier.</p><h3>Manger et boi​re</h3><p>Votre enfant demandera probablement des gorgées d'eau 2 à 3 heures après l'opération. Dès que votre enfant pourra boire, nous recommencerons à revenir progressivement à une alimentation normale.</p><h3>Votre enfant demeurera à l'hôpital pour la ​nuit</h3><p>Vous pourrez passer la nuit avec votre enfant dans sa chambre.</p><h2>Avant l'opération</h2><p>Plusieurs heures avant l'opération, votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. Le médecin ou l'infirmier vous dira quand votre enfant doit cesser de manger et de boire. Écrivez ces informations<br> ici :</p><ul><li>La date et l'heure de votre opération :</li><li>L'heure à laquelle l'enfant doit cesser de manger :</li><li>L'heure à laquelle votre enfant doit arrêter de boire :</li><li>Autres choses à retenir :</li></ul>

 

 

Mastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infection1006.00000000000Mastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionMastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionMEnglishOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)EarsNervous systemProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZDenise Kipling, RN, BScN;Charlotte Cormack-Jones, RN, BScN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Blake Papsin, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FACS, FAAP6.0000000000000076.00000000000001146.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A mastoidectomy is surgery to remove a part of the bone behind a child's ear. Learn about what to expect during the operation and follow up treatment.</p><p>Your child needs an operation to take away part of the bone from behind the ear. This operation is called a mastoidectomy (say: MAST-oid-ECK-toe-mee). This operation will be performed by an otolaryngology (say OH-toe-lar-ing-olo-gee) doctor. </p><p>This brochure explains what will happen during the operation and how to care for your child at home. Use this information to explain to your child what will happen, using words they can understand. </p><h2>Important information</h2> <p>My child's otolaryngology doctor is:</p> <p>The doctor's phone number is:</p> <p>The otolaryngology clinic nurse's number is:</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A mastoidectomy is an operation to take away part of the bone from behind the ear.</li> <li>A mastoidectomy is done because of an infection or cholesteatoma that spreads to the mastoid bone.</li> <li>Your child will need an operation to remove the diseased part of the mastoid bone.</li> <li>Your child will need to have an anaesthetic. Your child will need to stay overnight in the hospital after the procedure.</li> </ul><h2>Caring for your child at home</h2> <h3>Caring for your child's incision</h3> <p>Your child may have a small gauze bandage over their ear. Please keep this bandage on for one or two days after going home. </p> <p>Do not let the cut behind your child's ear get wet. Try not to get water in the ear. Your child can have a bath, but do not wash your child's hair until the doctor sees your child. </p> <h3>Pain management at home</h3> <p>Follow these instructions when your child goes home after the procedure.</p> <p>You may give your child medicine for pain.</p> <p>You may receive a prescription for pain medication before you leave the hospital. Follow the dosage instructions give to you by the pharmacist. Although these prescription pain medications can be beneficial, they are also potentially very dangerous if not used properly.</p> <p>When using these medications, if you notice any changes in either breathing or level of drowsiness that concern you, stop the medication and seek medical attention. If your child is unresponsive, call 911 immediately.</p> <p>Do not give your child over-the-counter medicine that may have a sedative effect (makes people sleepy) while giving the prescription for pain medicine. Examples of these medicines are decongestants and antihistamines. Discuss these medications with your pharmacist.</p> <p>You may give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> if they have pain. Give the dose printed on the bottle for your child's age. Do not give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a> for two weeks after the surgery. These medications could increase your child's risk of bleeding after the operation. Check with the nurse or doctor first before giving these medicines to your child.</p> <h3>Activities</h3> <p>Do not let your child play contact sports like hockey or soccer until the otolaryngology doctor says it is OK. It is usually at least two weeks after the operation before a child is well enough to play contact sports. </p> <p>Do not let your child go swimming until the doctor says it is OK. Usually, children are instructed to wait about six weeks after the operation before they are allowed to go swimming. </p> <h3>Going back to school or day care</h3> <p>Do not let your child go back to school or day care until after your follow-up appointment. High school students can usually attend classes after three days if they are feeling well. </p><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>These are signs that there is a problem:</p> <ul> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher</li> <li>blood or fluid leaking from the ear for more than two days </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li>redness or swelling around the ear and the incision </li> <li>the packing falls out of the ear </li> </ul> <p>If your child has any of these signs, call your child's otolaryngologist, the otolaryngology clinic, or your family doctor right away. </p> <p>If this is an emergency, or if you are concerned about your child's condition, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department right away. </p><h2>Your child will need a follow-up appointment</h2> <p>The otolaryngologist will need to see your child again for a follow-up appointment. This appointment will be one or two weeks after the operation. </p> <p>Write the date and time here:</p> <p> </p> <p>During the appointment, the doctor will do these things:</p> <ul> <li>Check your child's ear to see how it is healing. </li> <li>Remove the packing from your child's ear. </li> <li>Tell you when your child can start to play sports again. </li> </ul><h2>Why a mastoidectomy is needed</h2><p>The bone behind the ear is called the mastoid bone (say: MAST-oid).</p><p>Your child may need a mastoidectomy because of one of these problems in the mastoid bone:</p><ul><li>infection</li><li>cholesteatoma</li></ul><h3>Infection</h3><p>The mastoid bone contains hollow spaces called air cells. The air cells are connected to the middle ear, which is the part of the ear behind the eardrum. Sometimes, infections in the middle ear can spread to the air cells in the mastoid bone.</p><p>If your child has too many infections in the mastoid bone, the bone can become soft. If this happens, that part of the bone must be taken away. Taking away the diseased part of the bone does these things:</p><ul><li>It stops the spread of infection.</li><li>Sometimes the hearing is slightly poorer after the surgery but the procedure stops any more damage to the ear and to your child's hearing.</li></ul><h3>Cholesteatoma</h3><p>A cholesteatoma (say: KOE-less-tee-uh-TOE-ma) is a growth in the middle ear. Layers of skin build up in the middle ear. If a cholesteatoma gets too big, it can damage your child's ear or their hearing.</p><p>If your child has a cholesteatoma, they may have some or all of these symptoms:</p><ul><li>bad-smelling fluid leaking from the ear</li><li>full feeling in the ear</li><li>pressure in the ear</li><li>loss of hearing</li></ul><p>These symptoms can also be caused by other problems. Your child may need to take several tests to find out what is causing the symptoms.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Cholesteatoma</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Cholesteatoma_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of the cholesteatoma, middle ear and ear drum" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A cholesteatoma is a growth of skin in the part of the ear behind the ear drum (the middle ear). This growth is like a cyst that builds up layers of skin in the middle ear.</figcaption> </figure> <p>A cholesteatoma can spread into the mastoid bone. If this happens, your child will need a mastoidectomy to stop any more damage to your child's ear or their hearing. Sometimes, removing the cholesteatoma may make the hearing slightly worse but often not enough for the child to notice.</p><h2>The operation takes about three hours</h2><p>Your child will have a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthetic</a>. This will make sure that they sleep during the operation and do not feel any pain. </p><p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon will do the operation. An otolaryngologist (say OH-toe-lar-ing-olo-gist) is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ear, nose and throat. </p><p>The doctor makes a cut behind the ear and takes out the affected mastoid bone. Then the doctor stitches the skin closed. The doctor may put a drain behind the ear to stop fluid and blood from collecting around the cut. This drain will be taken out before your child goes home from the hospital. </p><p>The operation takes about three hours.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">Mastoidectomy</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Mastoidectomy_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Incision line over mastoid bone on side of head and close-up of bone with mastoid air cells and with air cells removed" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> mastoid bone is located in the skull just behind the ear. When a mastoidectomy is performed, the air cells in the mastoid bone are removed.</figcaption></figure><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>After the operation, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post Anesthetic Care Unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in PACU for about one hour. We will then move your child to a room on the nursing unit. </p> <p>You will be able to see your child as soon as they are fully awake. A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child. </p> <p>Your child will have an intravenous tube (IV) in their arm. We will give your child medicine and fluids through the IV until they can drink easily. </p> <p>Your child may have a gauze bandage on their ear or around their head. Your child's doctor will take the bandage off the day after the operation. If your child has a drain, the doctor will remove it at the same time. </p> <p>Your child's ear may also be packed with a ribbon or sponge pack which will be taken out during a clinic visit after the operation.</p> <h3>Your child may feel dizzy</h3> <p>Your child may feel dizzy after the operation. You or another adult should be with your child when they get out of bed on the day of the surgery. </p> <h3>Taking care of your child's pain</h3> <p>If your child has pain after the operation, we will give them pain medicine, either through the IV tube in their arm or by a pill or liquid to swallow. You know your child best. If you think your child is in pain, tell the nurse. </p> <h3>Eating and drinking</h3> <p>Your child will probably ask for sips of water two to three hours after the operation. After your child can drink, we will start adding their usual food. </p> <h3>Your child will stay in the hospital overnight</h3> <p>You will be able to stay overnight with your child in their room.</p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. </p> <p>Write this information down here:</p> <ul> <li>The date and time of the operation: </li> <li>When your child must stop eating: </li> <li>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids: </li> <li>Other things to remember: </li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Cholesteatoma_MED_ILL_EN.jpgMastoidectomy to treat cholesteatoma or ear infectionFalse

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