AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Ureteral reimplant surgeryUUreteral reimplant surgeryUreteral reimplant surgeryEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAUretersProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZCathy Daniels, RN, MS, ACNP;Dalia Bozic, RN, BScN7.0000000000000070.0000000000000940.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A ureteral reimplant is an operation to fix a ureter that is not connected to the bladder properly. Read what to expect after ureteral reimplant surgery.</p><h2>What is ureteral reimplant surgery?</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Urinary system (female)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Location of kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra in upper body of a girl" /> </figure> <p>Ureteral reimplant (you-REE-ter-al ree-IM-plant) is a surgical procedure to fix a ureter that is not connected to the bladder in the usual place. The ureter is the tube that carries urine (pee) from <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=kidney-child">the kidneys to the bladder</a>. Sometimes, the ureter is connected to the bladder in such a way that it lets urine flow back to the kidneys. This can damage the kidneys.</p><p>Your child's operation is needed to prevent urine from backing up from the bladder to the kidney and damaging kidney tissue. Two different methods can be used for this operation. The urologist will discuss with you which one is best suited to your child's condition.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A ureteral reimplant is a surgical procedure to fix a ureter that is not connected to the bladder in the usual place. </li> <li>The surgery may take several hours. </li> <li>Your child will have one or more tubes after the surgery. These will need to stay in place for several days. </li> <li>Children can usually return to regular activities within about a week after the surgery. </li> </ul><h2>Your child will have several tubes after the operation</h2> <p>When your child comes back from the operating and recovery rooms, they will have some or all of the following tubes in place:</p> <ul> <li>An intravenous (IV) tube. This is a small plastic tube that goes into a vein in your child's arm. It is used to give your child fluids and medications until they can drink. </li> <li>A <a href="/Article?contentid=1246&language=English">urinary catheter</a>. This is a small tube that goes into your child's bladder to drain the urine. The type of catheter your child has depends on the type of surgery. A urethral catheter goes into the bladder through the urethra, the tube that takes urine from the bladder to the outside of the body. A supra-pubic catheter goes into the bladder through a tiny opening in your child's abdomen (belly). </li> <li>A drain. This is a small rubber tube that is placed in your child's belly to drain out extra fluid that may have collected during surgery. </li> <li>A stent. This is a tube that drains the urine from the ureter above the place where the surgery was performed. The stent will come out through a small opening in the belly. </li> <li>An internal stent. This is a small tube that might be left inside the body and removed six weeks after the operation. It helps drain the urine from the kidney to the bladder. This helps the area where the surgery was done to heal. </li> </ul> <p>Ask your doctor what types of draining tubes your child will probably need, so that you know what to expect after the operation. The doctor or nurse can explain how long your child will need each tube. </p><h2>Returning to normal after the operation</h2> <h3>Eating and drinking</h3> <p>Most likely, your child will not be allowed to eat or drink anything until the morning after the operation. At this time, your nurse will explain how to start slowly with fluids. Your child can gradually eat and drink more until they are back to what they normally eat and drink. The IV tube will come out after your child is drinking fluids well. </p> <h3>Pain management</h3> <p>Your child will feel pain after surgery. There are several ways to control pain. Your doctor and nurse will recommend the method they think will keep your child most pain free. Let your nurse know how well the pain is being managed. If you feel your child is in pain, tell the nurse. </p> <h3>Bladder spasms</h3> <p>After the surgery, your child may have bladder spasms. Bladder spasms happen because of irritation from the surgery and from the catheters in the bladder. When the bladder muscle spasms, your child may do the following things: </p> <ul> <li>suddenly get irritable </li> <li>draw their legs up </li> <li>complain of itchiness or pressure in their bottom </li> </ul> <p>The nurse can give your child medicine that will help control the spasms. There are two types of medicine that can help reduce bladder spasms. One is orally taken by mouth. The other is a suppository, a pill that is put in your child's bottom. </p> <h3>Getting up and out of bed</h3> <p>Your child will be encouraged to get out of bed the day after surgery, with the help of pain medication. Getting up and moving around are an important part of getting better. </p> <p>The nurse will also encourage your child to take big deep breaths and to cough. These actions will help your child get better faster. </p> <h3>Stitches on the incision</h3> <p>Your child will have a bandage covering the incision (cut). This will come off four to five days after the operation, or you will be asked to soak it off in the bath at home. The stitches underneath the bandage will dissolve on their own. This means that no stitches need to be removed after you take your child home. </p> <h3>Removing the catheter or catheters</h3> <p>Your child's doctor or nurse will discuss with you when the catheter(s) will be taken out and which tests need to be done before the child goes home. Your child may be discharged with a catheter in place. Your nurse will teach you how to care for the catheter at home and organize any home nursing or other supports you may need. </p><h2>The day of surgery</h2> <p>Bring your child to the Urology or Day Surgery unit two hours before the time of your child's operation. During this time the following things will happen: </p> <ul> <li>your child will be admitted to the unit </li> <li>the nurse will examine your child </li> <li>your child will change into a hospital gown </li> </ul> <p>A small number of children are admitted on the day before surgery. Your child's urologist will tell you if your child needs to do this. </p> <p>Your child's operation is scheduled for: (date and time) _______________________________</p> <p>Please bring your child to the unit at: (date and time) _________________________________</p> <p>Name and location of the surgical unit doing the operation:____________________________</p> <p>How long the operation takes depends on the surgery that is planned. Check with your child's nurse to find out how long the operation will probably take. </p><h2>At SickKids</h2><h3>Supporting your child</h3><p>When preparing your child for an operation, the urology team recommends that whenever possible, your child and family members attend the Pre-Admission Program offered at SickKids. For more information call 416-813-6150 or visit the website at <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/">www.sickkids.ca</a>.</p><p>A <a href="/Article?contentid=1153&language=English">Child Life Specialist</a> can also help to prepare and support your child if they are anxious about the operation.</p><p>Urology surgery is done at the SDA unit on 6B. Take the Atrium elevators from the Elizabeth Street entrance to the 6th floor.</p><h2>Useful websites</h2><p> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/" target="_blank">www.sickkids.ca</a> </p><p> <a href="http://www.cua.org/" target="_blank">www.cua.org</a> </p>
Réimplantation urétéraleRRéimplantation urétéraleUreteral reimplant surgeryFrenchUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAUretersProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZCathy Daniels, RN, MS, ACNP;Dalia Bozic, RN, BScN7.0000000000000070.0000000000000940.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Une réimplantation urétérale est une opération qui consiste à remettre en place un uretère qui n'est pas lié à la vessie correctement.</p><h2>Qu'est-ce que la réimplantation urétérale?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Système urinaire (féminin)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="L’emplacement du rein, de l’uretère, de la vessie et de l’urètre dans le haut du corps d’une fille" /></figure> <p>La réimplantation urétérale est une intervention chirurgicale qui consiste à remettre en place un uretère qui n'est pas connecté à la vessie au bon endroit. L'uretère est le tube qui transporte l'urine (le pipi) des reins à la vessie. Parfois, l'uretère est lié à la vessie ce qui laisse remonter l'urine aux reins, ce qui peut les endommager.</p><p>Votre enfant doit se faire opérer pour empêcher l'urine de remonter de la vessie aux reins et d'endommager les tissus rénaux. Cette opération peut se faire de 2 méthodes différentes. L'urologue discutera avec vous de celle qui cadre le mieux avec l'état de votre enfant. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Une réimplantation urétérale est une intervention chirurgicale qui consiste à remettre en place un uretère qui n'est pas lié à la vessie au bon endroit.</li> <li>L'opération pourrait prendre plusieurs heures.</li> <li>Votre enfant pourrait avoir un ou plusieurs tubes, qui devront rester en place pendant plusieurs jours.</li> <li>Les enfants peuvent habituellement reprendre leurs activités normales après environ une semaine.</li></ul><h2>Votre enfant sera « branché » à plusieurs tubes après l'opération</h2> <p>Quand votre enfant sortira de la salle d'opération et de réveil, tous ou certains des tubes suivants seront installés :</p> <ul><li>Un tube intraveineux (IV). C'est un petit tube de plastique qui s'insère dans une veine du bras. On s'en sert pour lui donner des liquides et des médicaments jusqu'à ce qu'il puisse boire.</li> <li>Un cathéter urinaire. C'est un petit tube qui entre dans la vessie de votre enfant et qui la draine. Le type de cathéter utilisé dépend du type d'opération. Un cathéter urétral se rend dans la vessie à partir de l'urètre, le tube qui achemine l'urine de la vessie à l'extérieur du corps. Un cathéter sus-pubien s'installe dans la vessie et passe par une petite ouverture dans l'abdomen de votre enfant (ventre).</li> <li>Un drain. C'est un petit tube de caoutchouc placé dans le ventre de votre enfant et qui draine le liquide en surplus qui peut s'être accumulé pendant l'opération.</li> <li>Une endoprothèse. C'est un tube qui draine l'urine de l'uretère au-dessus du site de l'opération. L'endoprothèse sortira par une petite ouverture dans le ventre.</li> <li>Une endoprothèse. Petit tube qui pourrait être laissé dans le corps et retiré 6 semaines après l'opération. Il aide à drainer l'urine en provenance des reins et à destination de la vessie. L'endoprothèse aide le site de l'opération à guérir.</li></ul> <p>Demandez au médecin quels sont les types de tubes dont votre enfant aura probablement besoin, pour que vous sachiez à quoi vous attendre après l'opération. Le médecin ou l'infirmier peut vous dire pendant combien de temps votre enfant aura besoin de chaque tube.</p><h2>Retour à la normale après l'opération</h2> <h3>Manger et boire</h3> <p>Il est fort probable que votre enfant ne puisse ni boire ni manger avant le matin qui suit l'opération. À ce moment, votre infirmier vous expliquera comment lentement recommencer à boire des liquides. Votre enfant pourra graduellement augmenter ce qu'il boit jusqu'à ce qu'il mange et boive normalement. Le tube IV sera retiré quand votre enfant pourra bien tolérer les liquides.</p> <h3>Gestion de la douleur</h3> <p>Votre enfant ressentira de la douleur après l'opération, mais il existe plusieurs moyens de la contrôler. Votre médecin et votre infirmier vous recommanderont la méthode qu'ils estiment la plus efficace contre la douleur. Dites à votre infirmier si la douleur est bien gérée. Si vous sentez que votre enfant a mal, dites-le à l'infirmier.</p> <h3>Spasmes vésicaux</h3> <p>Après l'opération, votre enfant pourrait avoir des spasmes vésicaux. Ils sont attribuables à une irritation due à l'opération et des cathéters dans la vessie. Quand les muscles de la vessie se contractent soudainement, votre enfant pourrait faire ce qui suit:</p> <ul><li>devenir soudainement irritable;</li> <li>remonter les jambes vers la poitrine;</li> <li>se plaindre de démangeaisons ou de pression dans les fesses.</li></ul> <p>L'infirmier peut donner à votre enfant des médicaments qui contrôleront les spasmes. Il existe 2 types de médicaments qui peuvent réduire les spasmes : un se prend par la bouche, et l'autre est un suppositoire, un médicament à mettre dans le rectum de votre enfant.</p> <h3>Se lever et sortir du lit</h3> <p>On encouragera votre enfant à se lever et à sortir du lit le jour qui suit l'opération. En cas de besoin, il pourra prendre des médicaments contre la douleur. Se lever et bouger est une partie intégrante de la convalescence.</p> <p>L'infirmier encouragera aussi votre enfant à prendre de grandes respirations profondes et à tousser, ce qui aidera votre enfant à se sentir mieux plus vite.</p> <h3>Points de sutures</h3> <p>Un pansement couvrira l'incision de votre enfant. On le retirera 4 à 5 jours après l'opération. On pourrait aussi vous demander de le retirer dans le bain. Les points sous le pansement disparaîtront tous seuls, ce qui signifie que vous n'aurez pas besoin de les faire retirer.</p> <h3>Retrait du ou des cathéter(s)</h3> <p>Le médecin ou l'infirmier vous parlera du moment où on retirera le(s) cathéter(s) et des tests qu'il faudra faire avant que l'enfant ne retourne à la maison. Votre enfant pourrait aussi recevoir son congé et encore porter un cathéter. Un infirmier vous enseignera comment prendre soin du cathéter à la maison et prendra les mesures nécessaires pour les soins infirmiers à domicile ou d'autres types de soutien dont vous auriez besoin.</p><h2>Le jour de l'opération</h2> <p>Conduisez votre enfant au département d'urologie ou de chirurgie de jour 2 heures avant l'heure de l'opération. Pendant ce temps, voici ce qui se produira :</p> <ul><li>votre enfant sera admis à l'unité;</li> <li>l'infirmier examinera votre enfant;</li> <li>votre enfant revêtira une chemise d'hôpital.</li></ul> <p>Très peu d'enfants sont admis la journée avant l'opération. L'urologue de votre enfant vous dira si c'est le cas. </p> <p>L'opération de votre enfant est prévue le : (date et heure) _______________________________</p> <p>Veuillez conduire votre enfant à l'unité : (date et heure) _________________________________</p> <p>Nom et emplacement de l'unité chirurgicale où se fera l'opération : ____________________________</p> <p>La durée de l'opération dépend de l'opération prévue. Demandez à l'infirmier de votre enfant si on sait combien de temps l'opération durera.</p><h2>À l'hôpital SickKids </h2><h3>Soutien à votre enfant</h3><p>Quand vous préparerez votre enfant pour une opération, l'équipe d'urologie recommande que dans la mesure du possible, votre enfant et les membres de sa famille participent au programme préalable à l'admission à SickKids. Pour de plus amples renseignements, composez le 416-813-6150 ou visitez le site Web, à l'adresse <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/">www.sickkids.ca</a>.</p><p>Un éducateur en miliue spécialisé peut aussi aider à préparer et à soutenir votre enfant si l'opération l'inquiète.</p><p>Les opérations en urologie se font à l'unité d'admission de jour dans l'aile 6B. Prenez les ascenseurs de l'Atrium à partir de l'entrée de la rue Elizabeth jusqu'au 6e étage.<br></p><h2>Sites Web utiles</h2><p> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/" target="_blank">www.sickkids.ca</a> </p><p> <a href="http://www.cua.org/" target="_blank">www.cua.org</a> </p>

 

 

Ureteral reimplant surgery1021.00000000000Ureteral reimplant surgeryUreteral reimplant surgeryUEnglishUrologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAUretersProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZCathy Daniels, RN, MS, ACNP;Dalia Bozic, RN, BScN7.0000000000000070.0000000000000940.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A ureteral reimplant is an operation to fix a ureter that is not connected to the bladder properly. Read what to expect after ureteral reimplant surgery.</p><h2>What is ureteral reimplant surgery?</h2> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Urinary system (female)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Location of kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra in upper body of a girl" /> </figure> <p>Ureteral reimplant (you-REE-ter-al ree-IM-plant) is a surgical procedure to fix a ureter that is not connected to the bladder in the usual place. The ureter is the tube that carries urine (pee) from <a href="https://pie.med.utoronto.ca/htbw/module.html?module=kidney-child">the kidneys to the bladder</a>. Sometimes, the ureter is connected to the bladder in such a way that it lets urine flow back to the kidneys. This can damage the kidneys.</p><p>Your child's operation is needed to prevent urine from backing up from the bladder to the kidney and damaging kidney tissue. Two different methods can be used for this operation. The urologist will discuss with you which one is best suited to your child's condition.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A ureteral reimplant is a surgical procedure to fix a ureter that is not connected to the bladder in the usual place. </li> <li>The surgery may take several hours. </li> <li>Your child will have one or more tubes after the surgery. These will need to stay in place for several days. </li> <li>Children can usually return to regular activities within about a week after the surgery. </li> </ul><h2>Your child will have several tubes after the operation</h2> <p>When your child comes back from the operating and recovery rooms, they will have some or all of the following tubes in place:</p> <ul> <li>An intravenous (IV) tube. This is a small plastic tube that goes into a vein in your child's arm. It is used to give your child fluids and medications until they can drink. </li> <li>A <a href="/Article?contentid=1246&language=English">urinary catheter</a>. This is a small tube that goes into your child's bladder to drain the urine. The type of catheter your child has depends on the type of surgery. A urethral catheter goes into the bladder through the urethra, the tube that takes urine from the bladder to the outside of the body. A supra-pubic catheter goes into the bladder through a tiny opening in your child's abdomen (belly). </li> <li>A drain. This is a small rubber tube that is placed in your child's belly to drain out extra fluid that may have collected during surgery. </li> <li>A stent. This is a tube that drains the urine from the ureter above the place where the surgery was performed. The stent will come out through a small opening in the belly. </li> <li>An internal stent. This is a small tube that might be left inside the body and removed six weeks after the operation. It helps drain the urine from the kidney to the bladder. This helps the area where the surgery was done to heal. </li> </ul> <p>Ask your doctor what types of draining tubes your child will probably need, so that you know what to expect after the operation. The doctor or nurse can explain how long your child will need each tube. </p><h2>Returning to normal after the operation</h2> <h3>Eating and drinking</h3> <p>Most likely, your child will not be allowed to eat or drink anything until the morning after the operation. At this time, your nurse will explain how to start slowly with fluids. Your child can gradually eat and drink more until they are back to what they normally eat and drink. The IV tube will come out after your child is drinking fluids well. </p> <h3>Pain management</h3> <p>Your child will feel pain after surgery. There are several ways to control pain. Your doctor and nurse will recommend the method they think will keep your child most pain free. Let your nurse know how well the pain is being managed. If you feel your child is in pain, tell the nurse. </p> <h3>Bladder spasms</h3> <p>After the surgery, your child may have bladder spasms. Bladder spasms happen because of irritation from the surgery and from the catheters in the bladder. When the bladder muscle spasms, your child may do the following things: </p> <ul> <li>suddenly get irritable </li> <li>draw their legs up </li> <li>complain of itchiness or pressure in their bottom </li> </ul> <p>The nurse can give your child medicine that will help control the spasms. There are two types of medicine that can help reduce bladder spasms. One is orally taken by mouth. The other is a suppository, a pill that is put in your child's bottom. </p> <h3>Getting up and out of bed</h3> <p>Your child will be encouraged to get out of bed the day after surgery, with the help of pain medication. Getting up and moving around are an important part of getting better. </p> <p>The nurse will also encourage your child to take big deep breaths and to cough. These actions will help your child get better faster. </p> <h3>Stitches on the incision</h3> <p>Your child will have a bandage covering the incision (cut). This will come off four to five days after the operation, or you will be asked to soak it off in the bath at home. The stitches underneath the bandage will dissolve on their own. This means that no stitches need to be removed after you take your child home. </p> <h3>Removing the catheter or catheters</h3> <p>Your child's doctor or nurse will discuss with you when the catheter(s) will be taken out and which tests need to be done before the child goes home. Your child may be discharged with a catheter in place. Your nurse will teach you how to care for the catheter at home and organize any home nursing or other supports you may need. </p><h2>The day of surgery</h2> <p>Bring your child to the Urology or Day Surgery unit two hours before the time of your child's operation. During this time the following things will happen: </p> <ul> <li>your child will be admitted to the unit </li> <li>the nurse will examine your child </li> <li>your child will change into a hospital gown </li> </ul> <p>A small number of children are admitted on the day before surgery. Your child's urologist will tell you if your child needs to do this. </p> <p>Your child's operation is scheduled for: (date and time) _______________________________</p> <p>Please bring your child to the unit at: (date and time) _________________________________</p> <p>Name and location of the surgical unit doing the operation:____________________________</p> <p>How long the operation takes depends on the surgery that is planned. Check with your child's nurse to find out how long the operation will probably take. </p><h2>At SickKids</h2><h3>Supporting your child</h3><p>When preparing your child for an operation, the urology team recommends that whenever possible, your child and family members attend the Pre-Admission Program offered at SickKids. For more information call 416-813-6150 or visit the website at <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/">www.sickkids.ca</a>.</p><p>A <a href="/Article?contentid=1153&language=English">Child Life Specialist</a> can also help to prepare and support your child if they are anxious about the operation.</p><p>Urology surgery is done at the SDA unit on 6B. Take the Atrium elevators from the Elizabeth Street entrance to the 6th floor.</p><h2>Useful websites</h2><p> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/" target="_blank">www.sickkids.ca</a> </p><p> <a href="http://www.cua.org/" target="_blank">www.cua.org</a> </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Urinary_female_MED_ILL_EN.jpgUreteral reimplant surgeryFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.