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Choanal atresia: BilateralCChoanal atresia: BilateralChoanal atresia: BilateralEnglishOtolaryngologyNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNose;NasopharynxProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-07T04:00:00ZRafat Saleemi, RN, MN;Megan Bunch RN, BScN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001658.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>In bilateral choanal atresia both sides of the nasal passage are blocked by bone or soft tissue. Learn what happens during surgery and how to take care of your child at home.</p><h2>What is bilateral choanal atresia?</h2><p>Choanal atresia (say: co-ANN-ul ah-TREE-zee-ah) is a condition in which the back of the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue. The nasal passage is the route that brings air through the nose to the throat. Choanal atresia is present at birth. Some babies have a blocked nasal passage on one side (unilateral) and some babies have both sides blocked (bilateral). </p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Choanal </span><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">atresia</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="A normal nasal passage and a nasal passage with choanal atresia" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Choanal</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"></figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> atresia is a condition in which the back of the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue. Some babies have a blocked nasal passage on one side.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>In bilateral choanal atresia, the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue on both sides of the nose. Your baby will need an operation to help them breathe. </li> <li>During surgery, the nasal passage is opened, and small plastic tubes, called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. </li> <li>A nurse will show you how to give your baby nose drops and suction the nasal passage. </li> <li>It is important for you and anyone who is spending time with your baby to know the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress, how to suction the nasal stents, and be trained in CPR. </li> </ul><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>Please call your baby's otolaryngology doctor, the otolaryngology clinic or your family doctor right away if your baby has any of the following signs after going home. </p> <ul> <li>yellowish or green nasal discharge </li> <li>bleeding from the nose or mouth </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>the stents fall out </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>swelling of the nose or face </li> <li>difficulty swallowing </li> <li>difficulty breathing </li> </ul> <p>If this is an emergency, do not wait. Take your baby to the closest emergency department.</p><h2>Your child will need surgery to open the nasal passage</h2> <p>Babies cannot breathe well through their mouths for the first three to six months of life, so a baby with bilateral choanal atresia will need surgery (an operation) as soon as possible. </p> <p>During the operation, the nasal passage is opened. Small plastic tubes called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. Your baby will be able to breathe through these tubes. The tubes also keep the nasal passages open while the area is healing. </p> <p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon (ear nose and throat doctor) will do the surgery.</p> <p>This page explains what to expect when your baby is having surgery for bilateral choanal atresia and how to take care of your baby after the operation. </p><h2>What happens during the operation</h2> <p>Before the operation starts, your baby will have a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This means your baby will sleep through the operation and will not feel any pain. </p> <p>During the operation, the nasal passage is opened. Small plastic tubes called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. </p> <p>The operation usually takes from one to two hours.</p><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>You will be able to see your baby as soon as they are fully awake. A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your baby. </p> <h2>Your baby will probably be in the hospital for seven to 10 days</h2> <p>After the operation, your baby will spend up to four hours in the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit</a> (PACU). Your baby will then be transferred to a room on the Otolaryngology (ENT) inpatient unit. This room is called the constant observation room and has a nurse in it at all times. </p> <ul> <li>Your baby will be on a monitor that helps the nurse watch your baby's breathing. </li> <li>Your baby will have an IV tube in place until they are drinking and no longer needs IV medication. </li> <li>Your baby's nurse will tell you when your child can start drinking from the bottle or the breast. </li> <li>Your baby may sometimes have some pinkish-red mucus (sticky fluid) in their nasal stents or nostril. The nurses will suction this mucus with a narrow plastic tube. It will turn to a clear or white colour in a few days. </li> <li>You can sleep overnight in your baby's room. </li> <li>If your baby has pain after the operation, the doctor or nurse will give them pain medicine, either through the intravenous (IV) tube in the arm or as a liquid to swallow. </li> </ul> <p>If your baby has other medical conditions, your otolaryngology doctor will discuss this with you.</p><h2>Getting ready for the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your baby will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your baby must stop eating and drinking. </p> <h3>Important information</h3> <p>Date and time of the operation:</p> <p>When you must stop feeding your baby:</p> <p>Other things to remember:</p> <p>Your baby's otolaryngology (ENT) doctor:</p> <p>The doctor's phone number:</p> <p>The otolaryngology (ENT) clinic nurse's number:</p> <p>Your family doctor's number:</p>
Atrésie des choanes: bilatéraleAAtrésie des choanes: bilatéraleChoanal atresia: BilateralFrenchOtolaryngologyNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNose;NasopharynxProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-07T04:00:00ZRafat Saleemi, RN, MN;Megan Bunch RN, BScN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001658.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>On parle d’atrésie choanale bilatérale si les deux côtés du canal nasal sont obstrués par un os ou des tissus mous. Vous apprendrez ce qui se passe pendant l'opération et comment prendre soin de votre enfant à la maison.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que l’atrésie des choanes bilatérale?</h2><p>L’atrésie choanale, ou atrésie des choanes, est une pathologie qui cause une obstruction du canal nasal par des os ou des tissus mous. Le canal nasal est le passage qui apporte l’air du nez vers la gorge. L’atrésie choanale est présente à la naissance. Certains bébés ont une obstruction du canal choanal d’un côté (unilatérale) et certains autres, des deux côtés (bilatérale). </p><p></p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Atrésie choanale</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_FR.png" alt="Un passage nasal normal et un passage nasal avec l’atrésie choanale" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> L'atrésie choanale est un trouble où l'arrière de la voie nasale est bloqué par des os ou du tissu mou. Certains bébés ont une voie nasale bloquée d'un côté.</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>On parle d’atrésie choanale bilatérale si les deux côtés du canal nasal sont obstrués par un os ou des tissus mous. Votre bébé aura besoin d’une opération pour pouvoir respirer. </li> <li>Pendant l’opération, le canal nasal est ouvert, et de petits tubes de plastique, appelés endoprothèses nasales, sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le canal ouvert le temps qu'il guérisse.</li> <li>Une infirmière vous montrera comment donner des gouttes pour le nez à votre bébé et comment aspirer pour nettoyer le canal nasal.</li> <li>Il importe que vous et toute personne qui passe du temps avec votre bébé connaissiez les signes et symptômes de la détresse respiratoire, sachiez comment aspirer les endoprothèses et ayez reçu une formation en RCR. </li></ul><h2>Quand appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Veuillez appeler l’ORL, la clinique d’ORL ou votre médecin de famille immédiatement si votre bébé affiche les signes suivants une fois à la maison :</p> <ul> <li>écoulements nasaux jaunes ou verts;</li> <li>saignements du nez ou de la bouche; </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> de 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus; </li> <li>l'endoprothèse tombe;</li> <li>douleur qui empire; </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a> qui ne cessent pas;</li> <li>nez ou du visage enflés;</li> <li>difficulté à avaler;</li> <li>difficulté à respirer. </li></ul> <p>S’il s’agit d'une urgence, n'attendez pas et conduisez votre bébé au service d’urgence le plus près. </p><h2>Votre enfant devra se faire opérer pour que soit ouvert le canal nasal</h2> <p>Les bébés ont du mal à respirer par la bouche pendant les trois à six premiers mois de leur vie. Un bébé avec une atrésie choanale aura donc besoin d’une opération aussi tôt que possible. </p> <p>Pendant l’opération, le passage nasal est ouvert. De petits tubes de plastique appelés endoprothèses (stent) nasales sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le canal nasal ouvert le temps qu’il guérisse. Votre bébé sera en mesure de respirer par ces tubes. Les tubes gardent aussi les passages nasaux ouverts pendant que le site guérit. </p> <p>Un otorhinolaryingologiste/chirurgien de la tête et du cou (médecin spécialisé dans les oreilles, le nez et la gorge) fera l’opération. </p> <p>Cette page explique à quoi s’attendre quand votre bébé subit une opération pour l’atrésie choanale bilatérale et comment prendre soin de votre bébé après l’opération. </p><h2>Ce qui se passe pendant l’opération </h2> <p>Avant le début de l’opération, votre bébé aura besoin d’un « médicament pour dormir » spécial appelé <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=French">anesthésique général</a>. Cela signifie que votre bébé dormira tout au long de l’opération et ne sentira pas de douleur. </p> <p>Pendant l’opération, le canal nasal sera ouvert. De petits tubes de plastique appelés endoprothèses nasales sont placés dans chaque narine pour garder le passage nasal ouvert le temps qu’il guérisse.</p> <p>L’opération prend habituellement une à deux heures.</p><h2>Après l’opération</h2> <p>Vous pourrez voir votre bébé aussi tôt qu’il sera complètement réveillé. Un bénévole de la salle d’attente de la salle d’opération vous conduira auprès de votre bébé. </p> <h2>Votre enfant passera de 7 à 10 jours à l'hôpital</h2> <p>Après l’opération, votre bébé passera jusqu’à quatre heures en salle de réveil, aussi appelée l’<a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=French">unité de soins postopératoires</a>. Votre bébé sera ensuite transféré dans une chambre de l’unité ORL. Cette salle est appelée chambre d’observation constante où une infirmière est présente en tout temps. </p> <ul> <li>Votre bébé sera branché à un moniteur qui aide l’infirmière à surveiller la respiration de votre bébé.</li> <li>Votre bébé aura un tube intraveineux (IV) jusqu’à ce qu’il boive et n’ait plus besoin des médicaments IV. </li> <li>L’infirmière de votre bébé vous dira quand votre enfant peut commencer à boire au biberon ou au sein.</li> <li>Votre bébé pourrait parfois avoir des écoulements rosâtres ou rouges (liquide collant) qui s’échappent des endoprothèses ou des narines. Les infirmières aspireront ce mucus au moyen d’un mince tube de plastique. Le mucus deviendra transparent ou blanc après quelques jours.</li> <li>Vous pouvez dormir dans la chambre de votre enfant.</li> <li>Si votre bébé ressent de la douleur après l’opération, le médecin ou l’infirmière lui donnera des médicaments, au moyen de l'IV dans son bras ou sous forme de liquide à avaler. </li></ul> <p>Si votre bébé a d'autres troubles médicaux, votre ORL en discutera avec vous. </p><h2>Se préparer pour l’opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l’opération, votre bébé devra cesser de manger et de boire. Le médecin ou l’infirmière vous dira quand votre bébé doit cesser de manger et de boire. </p> <h3>Renseignements importants</h3> <p>Date et heure de l’opération :</p> <p>Quand cesser de nourrir l’enfant :</p> <p>Autres choses à garder à l’esprit :</p> <p>Otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL) de votre enfant :</p> <p>Numéro de téléphone :</p> <p>Numéro de l’infirmière de la clinique ORL :</p> <p>Numéro de votre médecin de famille :</p>

 

 

Choanal atresia: Bilateral1030.00000000000Choanal atresia: BilateralChoanal atresia: BilateralCEnglishOtolaryngologyNewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNose;NasopharynxProceduresCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-05-07T04:00:00ZRafat Saleemi, RN, MN;Megan Bunch RN, BScN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC8.0000000000000064.00000000000001658.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>In bilateral choanal atresia both sides of the nasal passage are blocked by bone or soft tissue. Learn what happens during surgery and how to take care of your child at home.</p><h2>What is bilateral choanal atresia?</h2><p>Choanal atresia (say: co-ANN-ul ah-TREE-zee-ah) is a condition in which the back of the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue. The nasal passage is the route that brings air through the nose to the throat. Choanal atresia is present at birth. Some babies have a blocked nasal passage on one side (unilateral) and some babies have both sides blocked (bilateral). </p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Choanal </span><span class="asset-image-title"></span><span class="asset-image-title">atresia</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_EN.png" alt="A normal nasal passage and a nasal passage with choanal atresia" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Choanal</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"></figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> atresia is a condition in which the back of the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue. Some babies have a blocked nasal passage on one side.</figcaption> </figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>In bilateral choanal atresia, the nasal passage is blocked by bone or soft tissue on both sides of the nose. Your baby will need an operation to help them breathe. </li> <li>During surgery, the nasal passage is opened, and small plastic tubes, called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. </li> <li>A nurse will show you how to give your baby nose drops and suction the nasal passage. </li> <li>It is important for you and anyone who is spending time with your baby to know the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress, how to suction the nasal stents, and be trained in CPR. </li> </ul><h2>A nurse will teach you how to care for your baby at home</h2> <p>Your baby's nurses, a Transitional Care Coordinator (TCC), and/or a Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) worker together will help you obtain all the supplies, equipment and support that you will need at home. The nurses will teach you how to care for your baby at home. </p> <ul> <li>A nurse will teach you and another family caregiver how to assess how well your baby is breathing through the stents, and the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress. Respiratory distress means your baby is not breathing well. </li> <li>You will also be taught how to suction the nasal stents so that they do not get blocked up. Before your baby goes home, nurses will help you practice until you are comfortable suctioning your baby's nasal stents. </li> <li>A nurse will show you how to clean your baby's nose and how to give your baby nose drops. </li> <li>You and the other family caregiver will be required to get your <a href="/article?contentid=1044&language=English">cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR</a>) certification. Someone at the hospital will help you arrange this. </li> </ul> <p>When you feel confident with suctioning and the otolaryngology doctor says it is okay, you will be able to take your baby off the unit. You will need to take the suctioning equipment with you. </p> <p>Before your baby is discharged home, a "Care by Parent Overnight Stay" will be arranged for you. This means that you and the other family caregiver can stay in a room on the unit, with your baby. You will do all the care for your baby that night. A nurse will be available as a resource person. This is to help you become more confident and independent in taking care of your child. It will also help you make decisions on how to set up your home. </p> <h2>Caring for your baby at home</h2> <p>Follow these intructions when your baby goes home after the procedure.</p> <h3>Keep your baby's nasal passages clear</h3> <p>Keep your baby's nasal passages clear as instructed by your nurses.</p> <h3>Give your baby nose drops</h3> <p>Your baby's nurse will give you a prescription for antibiotic nose drops before you leave the hospital. Remember to place the drops into the nasal passage around the stent. Do not put the drops'into the stents. </p> <h3>Feed your baby</h3> <p>Your baby can go back to their normal diet. Remember, make sure your baby's nasal passages are clear before starting to feed.</p> <h3>You may give your baby medicine for pain</h3> <p>You may receive a prescription for pain medication before you leave the hospital. Follow the dosage instructions given to you by the pharmacist. Although these prescription pain medications can be beneficial, they are also potentially very dangerous, if not used properly. </p> <p>When using these medications, if you notice any change in either breathing or level of drowsiness that concern you, stop the medication and seek medical attention. If your child is unresponsive, call 911 immediately. </p> <p>Do not give your child over-the-counter medicine, that may have a sedative effect (makes people sleep) while giving the prescription pain medicine. Examples of these medicines are decongestants and antihistamines. Discuss these medications with your pharmacist. </p> <p>You may give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> if they have pain. Give the dose as printed on the bottle for your child's age. Do not give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)​</a> for two weeks after the surgery. These medications could increase your child's risk of bleeding after the operation. Check with the nurse or doctor first before giving these medicines to your child. </p> <h3>Help your baby breathe more comfortably</h3> <p>You can use a machine called a humidifer to help your baby breathe more comfortably. A humidifer makes the air moist by creating a cool mist. This helps keep the mucus in your baby's nasal stents loose, so it does not become sticky and block them. Put the humidifier beside your baby's bed. </p> <h3>Bathing</h3> <p>Your baby can have baths. Make sure to keep tub water out of your baby's nose.</p> <h3>Make sure everyone who looks after your baby knows how to take care of them</h3> <p>Do not leave your baby with anyone who does not know how to take care of your baby safely. This includes:</p> <ul> <li>knowing the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress </li> <li>suctioning the nasal stents </li> <li>CPR training </li> </ul><h2>When to call the doctor</h2> <p>Please call your baby's otolaryngology doctor, the otolaryngology clinic or your family doctor right away if your baby has any of the following signs after going home. </p> <ul> <li>yellowish or green nasal discharge </li> <li>bleeding from the nose or mouth </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>the stents fall out </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>swelling of the nose or face </li> <li>difficulty swallowing </li> <li>difficulty breathing </li> </ul> <p>If this is an emergency, do not wait. Take your baby to the closest emergency department.</p><h2>Your baby will need to wear the stents for about three months</h2> <p>Nasal stents are usually left in the nasal passages for about three months. When ready, they will be removed in the hospital. Your baby will need a general anaesthetic. </p> <p>Your otolaryngology doctor will tell you when he will need to see your baby again. The otolaryngology unit will tell you the date and time for a follow-up appointment.</p> <h2>Making sure your baby is safe</h2> <p>Only leave your baby with people that know how to take care of your baby safely. This includes:</p> <ul> <li>knowing the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress</li> <li>suctioning the nasal stents </li> <li>CPR training </li> </ul><h2>Your child will need surgery to open the nasal passage</h2> <p>Babies cannot breathe well through their mouths for the first three to six months of life, so a baby with bilateral choanal atresia will need surgery (an operation) as soon as possible. </p> <p>During the operation, the nasal passage is opened. Small plastic tubes called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. Your baby will be able to breathe through these tubes. The tubes also keep the nasal passages open while the area is healing. </p> <p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon (ear nose and throat doctor) will do the surgery.</p> <p>This page explains what to expect when your baby is having surgery for bilateral choanal atresia and how to take care of your baby after the operation. </p><h2>What happens during the operation</h2> <p>Before the operation starts, your baby will have a special "sleep medicine" called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This means your baby will sleep through the operation and will not feel any pain. </p> <p>During the operation, the nasal passage is opened. Small plastic tubes called nasal stents are placed in each nostril to keep the nasal passage open while it is healing. </p> <p>The operation usually takes from one to two hours.</p><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>You will be able to see your baby as soon as they are fully awake. A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your baby. </p> <h2>Your baby will probably be in the hospital for seven to 10 days</h2> <p>After the operation, your baby will spend up to four hours in the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit</a> (PACU). Your baby will then be transferred to a room on the Otolaryngology (ENT) inpatient unit. This room is called the constant observation room and has a nurse in it at all times. </p> <ul> <li>Your baby will be on a monitor that helps the nurse watch your baby's breathing. </li> <li>Your baby will have an IV tube in place until they are drinking and no longer needs IV medication. </li> <li>Your baby's nurse will tell you when your child can start drinking from the bottle or the breast. </li> <li>Your baby may sometimes have some pinkish-red mucus (sticky fluid) in their nasal stents or nostril. The nurses will suction this mucus with a narrow plastic tube. It will turn to a clear or white colour in a few days. </li> <li>You can sleep overnight in your baby's room. </li> <li>If your baby has pain after the operation, the doctor or nurse will give them pain medicine, either through the intravenous (IV) tube in the arm or as a liquid to swallow. </li> </ul> <p>If your baby has other medical conditions, your otolaryngology doctor will discuss this with you.</p><h2>Getting ready for the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your baby will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your baby must stop eating and drinking. </p> <h3>Important information</h3> <p>Date and time of the operation:</p> <p>When you must stop feeding your baby:</p> <p>Other things to remember:</p> <p>Your baby's otolaryngology (ENT) doctor:</p> <p>The doctor's phone number:</p> <p>The otolaryngology (ENT) clinic nurse's number:</p> <p>Your family doctor's number:</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Choanal_atresia_MED_ILL_EN.pngChoanal atresia: BilateralFalse

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