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Choking: First aidCChoking: First aidChoking: First aidEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TracheaTracheaNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-03-11T05:00:00Z6.6000000000000073.80000000000001100.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>An overview of how to help your child when they are choking. Along with hands-on CPR training, this information can help save your child’s life.</p><h2>What causes choking?</h2><p>Choking occurs when something is stuck in the throat, blocking the airway to the lungs. This blockage can be partial or complete. The airway is the path air travels down to get to the lungs. Most choking episodes, such as those caused by liquids, clear without a need for assistance. When the airway is blocked, this is called foreign body airway obstruction.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Choking occurs when there is a blockage in the air tube to the lungs.</li><li>Take an official life support course to learn how to deal with choking.</li><li>If your child is not breathing, call 911. If you are not alone, get someone else to call for you.</li><li>If your child is over one year old, stand or kneel behind them to perform abdominal thrusts (the Heimlich maneuver).</li><li>If your child is under one year old, place the child on your forearm and perform alternating back blows and chest thrusts.</li><li>Keep small objects and foods out of young children's reach.</li></ul><p>The following information does not replace real, hands-on CPR training or training on how to deal with choking. CPR courses are often available through local recreation programs, advanced swim programs, and first aid programs. In Canada, such programs are offered by the <a href="https://www.redcross.ca/training-and-certification">Canadian Red Cross</a>, <a href="https://cpr.heartandstroke.ca/s/?language=en_US">Heart and Stroke Foundation</a> and <a href="https://www.sja.ca/English/Courses-and-Training/Pages/Course%20Descriptions/CPR-AED-Courses.aspx">St. John Ambulance</a> for example. The basic skills are simple and usually only take a few hours to learn.</p><h2>What to do if your child is choking</h2><h3>Check to see if your child is responsive</h3><p>Tap your child gently and ask loudly, "Are you OK?" If they do not answer, call 911. If you have someone with you, get them to call 911 and get help.</p><p>If your child does answer, encourage them to cough up the object on their own. Do not hit your child on the back to remove the object. Do not give your child anything to drink. This can block air from getting to the lungs.</p><h3>Check to see if your child is breathing</h3><p>If your child is not breathing and is unresponsive, call 911 and begin CPR. If you have someone with you, get them to call 911 and get help.</p><p>If your child is unresponsive but is breathing, then their airway is not completely blocked. Turn your child onto their side to keep the airway open and reduce the risk of a complete obstruction of the airway, and call 911. Stay with your child until their breathing improves and help arrives.</p><p>If your child is responsive and having a more severe choking episode, call 911. If there is someone with you, get them to call for you. You must act right away to relieve the blockage.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Child abdominal thrusts (standing)</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_child_heimlich_standing_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Woman kneeling to give Heimlich maneuver to standing child" /> </figure> <h3>Abdominal thrusts</h3><p>Abdominal thrusts increase the pressure in the chest, which helps to force out the object that is blocking the airway.</p><h3>If your child is over one year old </h3><ol><li>Stand or kneel behind your child. Wrap your arms around your child’s waist tightly, just below their lower ribs. </li><li>Make a fist with one hand. </li><li>Place the thumb side of your fist against the child’s abdomen, slightly above the navel and well below the breastbone. </li><li>Grasp your fist with the other hand and press into the child’s abdomen with quick forceful upward thrusts at a 45-degree angle. This will force out the remaining air in their chest and help bring up the object. </li><li>Repeat thrusts until the object is expelled from the airway or the child becomes unresponsive. </li></ol> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Infant back blows</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_infant_back_blows_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Giving back blows to infant held face-down on a person’s knee" /> </figure> <h3>If your child is under one year old</h3><p>In a seated or kneeling position, place your child face-down on your knees or resting on your forearm. Support the child’s head and jaw with your hand. Using the heel of your hand, give up to five firm back blows between the child’s shoulder blades. Deliver each slap with sufficient force to attempt to dislodge the object.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Infant chest compressions</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_infant_chest_compressions_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Performing chest compressions on infant lying on their back" /> </figure> <p>After giving 5 back blows, if your child is still not breathing, turn them carefully onto their back, continuing to support their neck and head, and place two fingers over the lower breast bone, just below the nipple-line. Using your fingers, perform five quick chest compressions. Alternate between back blows and chest compressions. </p><p>If your infant becomes unresponsive, perform CPR, making sure to look into the mouth for the obstruction prior to attempting to provide a breath. If you are alone and 911 has not yet been activated, carry your infant with you to the phone and call 911 as you continue CPR. Continue CPR until help arrives or your child begins to breathe on their own. If your child is breathing but not yet “awake” or responsive, position them on their side and monitor them until help arrives.</p>
الاختناق: الاسعافات الاوليةاالاختناق: الاسعافات الاوليةChoking: First aidArabicRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TracheaTracheaNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z6.0000000000000077.0000000000000584.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>النقاط الرئيسية</h2><ul><li>يحدث الاختناق عندما يكون هناك انسداد في انبوب الهواء الى الرئتين.</li><li>إذا كان طفلك لا يتنفس، اتصل بالرقم 1-1-9. إذا لم تكن لوحدك، اطلب من شخص آخر الاتصال نيابة عنك. </li><li>إذا كانت طفلتك اكثر من سنة واحدة من العمر، قف او اركع وراءها لأداء اجراء هايملِك.</li><li>إذا كانت طفلتك اقل من سنة واحدة من العمر، اجعل وجهها الى الاسفل على ركبتيك او على ساعدك لأداء اجراء هايملك</li><li>ابق الاشياء الصغيرة والمواد الغذائية بعيدا عن متناول الاطفال الصغار.</li></ul>
窒息 :急救窒息 :急救Choking: First aidChineseSimplifiedRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TracheaTracheaNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z77.00000000000006.00000000000000584.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>當您的孩子窒息時一種簡單易懂的幫助她的方法。</p>
梗塞:急救梗塞:急救Choking: First AidChineseTraditionalRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TracheaTracheaNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z77.00000000000006.00000000000000584.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z當您的孩子窒息時一種簡單易懂的幫助她的方法。
Suffocation: premiers soinsSSuffocation: premiers soinsChoking: First aidFrenchRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TracheaTracheaNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z6.0000000000000077.0000000000000584.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez à déceler la suffocation chez votre enfant et ce qu’il faut faire pour l’aider. Voici quelques conseils sur la manière de prévenir la suffocation chez votre enfant.</p><h2>Quelles sont les causes de la suffocation?</h2><p>La suffocation survient lorsque quelque chose dans la gorge obstrue les voies aériennes et bloque la circulation de l'air vers les poumons. Le blocage peut être partiel ou complet. L'air pour parvenir aux poumons emprunte le chemin des voies respiratoires. On peut remédier à la plupart des épisodes de suffocation, comme ceux causés par des liquides, sans aide extérieure. Lorsque les voies aériennes sont bloquées, l'obstruction est appelée « Obstruction des voies respiratoires par corps étranger ».<br></p><h2>À retenir<br></h2><ul><li> La suffocation est le résultat d'un blocage de la trachée.</li><li>Si votre enfant ne respire pas, appelez le 911. Si vous n'êtes pas seul, demandez que quelqu'un appelle à votre place. </li><li>Si votre enfant est âgé de plus d'un an, tenez-vous debout ou agenouillez-vous derrière lui afin d'exécuter la manœuvre de Heimlich.</li><li>Si votre enfant est âgé de moins d'un an, placez-le sur vos genoux ou sur votre avant-bras, face vers le bas afin d'exécuter la manœuvre de Heimlich.</li><li>Gardez les petits objets et la nourriture hors de portée des petits enfants.</li></ul><h2>Que faire si votre enfant est en train de suffoquer</h2><h3>Vérifiez s'il réagit bien</h3><p>Manifestez gentiment votre présence et posez-lui la question à haute voix : « Ça va? » S'il ne répond pas, appelez le 911. Si vous n'êtes pas seul, demandez que quelqu'un appelle à votre place. </p><p>Si votre enfant peut répondre, encouragez-le à tousser pour se dégager les voies respiratoires. Ne frappez pas votre enfant dans le dos pour enlever l'objet. Ne donnez rien à boire à votre enfant. Cela pourrait empêcher l'air de circuler jusqu'à ses poumons. </p><h3>Vérifiez s’il respire bien </h3><p>Si votre enfant ne respire pas, appelez le 911. Si vous n'êtes pas seul, demandez que quelqu'un appelle à votre place. </p><p>Si votre enfant respire, ses voies aériennes ne sont pas entièrement bloquées. Déplacez votre enfant pour qu'il repose sur son côté afin de garder ses voies aériennes ouvertes et d'empêcher qu'elles ne s'obstruent. Restez aux côtés de votre enfant jusqu'à ce qu'il respire mieux. </p><p>Si votre enfant éprouve un épisode de suffocation plus grave, appelez le 911. Si vous n'êtes pas seul, demandez que quelqu'un appelle à votre place. Il vous faut agir immédiatement pour remédier au blocage des voies respiratoires.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Manœuvre de Heimlich pour les enfants (en position debout)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_child_heimlich_standing_EQUIP_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Femme à genoux pour exécuter la manœuvre de Heimlich sur un enfant tenu debout devant elle" /> </figure> <h3>Manœuvre de Heimlich</h3><p>La manœuvre de Heimlich augmente la pression dans la poitrine, ce qui contribue à éjecter l'objet qui bloque les voies respiratoires. </p><h3>Si votre enfant a plus d’un an </h3><p>Tenez-vous debout ou agenouillez-vous derrière votre enfant. Tenez-le contre vous en le serrant fort, en appuyant sous les côtes inférieures. Commencez à exercer une poussée rapide vers le haut à un angle de 45 degrés. L'air restant sera expulsé de la poitrine avec force, ce qui aidera à restituer l'objet. Répétez le geste 10 autres fois sans faire de pauses. </p></div></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Manœuvre de Heimlich pour les enfants (en position coucher)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_child_heimlich_laying_down_EQUIP_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Femme exécutant la manœuvre de Heimlich sur un enfant couché sur son dos" /> </figure> <p>La manœuvre de Heimlich peut également être exécutée en couchant votre enfant sur le dos. Placez la paume d'une main exactement sous ses côtes et l'autre main par-dessus la première et commencez à exercer une forte pression par accoup. </p></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Claques dans le dos pour les nourrissons</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_infant_back_blows_EQUIP_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Donnant des claques dans le dos à un nourrisson tenu sur le genou, face vers le bas" /> </figure> <h3>Si votre enfant a plus d’un an</h3><p>Placez votre enfant sur vos genoux ou sur votre avant-bras, face vers le bas. Utilisez la paume de la main et assénez cinq bons coups entre les omoplates. </p></div><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Compressions thoraciques pour les nourrissons</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_infant_chest_compressions_EQUIP_ILL_FR.jpg" alt="Exerçant des compressions thoraciques sur un nourrisson couché sur son dos" /> </figure> <p>Si votre enfant ne respire toujours pas, couchez-le sur le dos et placez deux doigts sur la partie inférieure du sternum, juste en dessous de la ligne des mamelons. À l'aide de vos doigts, exercez cinq compressions rapides sur la poitrine. </p></div></div></div></div></div>
Asfixia: Primeros auxiliosAAsfixia: Primeros auxiliosChoking: First AidSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z77.00000000000006.00000000000000584.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Una descripción sencilla de la forma de ayudar a su niño cuando se está asfixiando.</p>
மூச்சுத்திணறுதல்: முதல் உதவிமூச்சுத்திணறுதல்: முதல் உதவிChoking: First AidTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z77.00000000000006.00000000000000584.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>உங்கள் பிள்ளைக்கு மூச்சுத்திணறல் ஏற்படும்போது அவளுக்கு எப்படி உதவுவது என்பது பற்றிய இலகுவான மேற்பார்வை.</p>
گلے میں کوئی چیز پھنسنا: ابتدائِ طبی امدادگگلے میں کوئی چیز پھنسنا: ابتدائِ طبی امدادChoking: First AidUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2010-11-01T04:00:00Z77.00000000000006.00000000000000584.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>نظام تنفس میں خرابی، ھیملیچ مینوور، سانس، سانس لینے کا نظام، جسم کا اوپری حصہ<br></p>

 

 

 

 

Choking: First aid1039.00000000000Choking: First aidChoking: First aidCEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)TracheaTracheaNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-03-11T05:00:00Z6.6000000000000073.80000000000001100.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>An overview of how to help your child when they are choking. Along with hands-on CPR training, this information can help save your child’s life.</p><h2>What causes choking?</h2><p>Choking occurs when something is stuck in the throat, blocking the airway to the lungs. This blockage can be partial or complete. The airway is the path air travels down to get to the lungs. Most choking episodes, such as those caused by liquids, clear without a need for assistance. When the airway is blocked, this is called foreign body airway obstruction.</p><h2>How to tell if your child is choking</h2><p>A mild choking episode may cause your child to cough, gag or vomit. Your child's face may also turn very red. If your child is having a more severe choking episode, they will not be able to breathe, cry or speak. Their skin, lips, and nails may turn a purplish-blue colour.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Choking occurs when there is a blockage in the air tube to the lungs.</li><li>Take an official life support course to learn how to deal with choking.</li><li>If your child is not breathing, call 911. If you are not alone, get someone else to call for you.</li><li>If your child is over one year old, stand or kneel behind them to perform abdominal thrusts (the Heimlich maneuver).</li><li>If your child is under one year old, place the child on your forearm and perform alternating back blows and chest thrusts.</li><li>Keep small objects and foods out of young children's reach.</li></ul><h2>How to prevent your child from choking</h2><p>As children grow, so does their curiosity for the environment around them. Children often make initial contact with an unfamiliar object with their hands, but in a matter of seconds it can end up in their mouth. To prevent this from happening, take the following steps:</p><ul><li>Keep small objects and foods out of your child's reach.</li><li>Eat food only at the table, limit distractions and avoid making your child laugh with food in their mouth.</li><li>Teach your child to chew all foods thoroughly before swallowing and not to drink while still chewing.</li><li>If your child is under four years old, do not give foods such as popcorn, nuts, seeds, hard candies and raw carrots, and avoid sticky foods such as marshmallows, chunks of peanut butter, caramels and chewing gum.</li><li>Cut soft foods such as hotdogs, sausages, cheese and fruit into small pieces. Cut round foods such as grapes, berries and cherry tomatoes in half to make them less likely to block the airway during a choking event.</li><li>Fish bones can get stuck in the back of the throat or embedded in the tonsils.</li><li>Be careful when visiting other homes, and clean up right away after parties. </li><li>Rubber balloon have become the leading cause of choking-related deaths from objects other than food.</li></ul><p>The following information does not replace real, hands-on CPR training or training on how to deal with choking. CPR courses are often available through local recreation programs, advanced swim programs, and first aid programs. In Canada, such programs are offered by the <a href="https://www.redcross.ca/training-and-certification">Canadian Red Cross</a>, <a href="https://cpr.heartandstroke.ca/s/?language=en_US">Heart and Stroke Foundation</a> and <a href="https://www.sja.ca/English/Courses-and-Training/Pages/Course%20Descriptions/CPR-AED-Courses.aspx">St. John Ambulance</a> for example. The basic skills are simple and usually only take a few hours to learn.</p><h2>What to do if your child is choking</h2><h3>Check to see if your child is responsive</h3><p>Tap your child gently and ask loudly, "Are you OK?" If they do not answer, call 911. If you have someone with you, get them to call 911 and get help.</p><p>If your child does answer, encourage them to cough up the object on their own. Do not hit your child on the back to remove the object. Do not give your child anything to drink. This can block air from getting to the lungs.</p><h3>Check to see if your child is breathing</h3><p>If your child is not breathing and is unresponsive, call 911 and begin CPR. If you have someone with you, get them to call 911 and get help.</p><p>If your child is unresponsive but is breathing, then their airway is not completely blocked. Turn your child onto their side to keep the airway open and reduce the risk of a complete obstruction of the airway, and call 911. Stay with your child until their breathing improves and help arrives.</p><p>If your child is responsive and having a more severe choking episode, call 911. If there is someone with you, get them to call for you. You must act right away to relieve the blockage.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Child abdominal thrusts (standing)</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_child_heimlich_standing_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Woman kneeling to give Heimlich maneuver to standing child" /> </figure> <h3>Abdominal thrusts</h3><p>Abdominal thrusts increase the pressure in the chest, which helps to force out the object that is blocking the airway.</p><h3>If your child is over one year old </h3><ol><li>Stand or kneel behind your child. Wrap your arms around your child’s waist tightly, just below their lower ribs. </li><li>Make a fist with one hand. </li><li>Place the thumb side of your fist against the child’s abdomen, slightly above the navel and well below the breastbone. </li><li>Grasp your fist with the other hand and press into the child’s abdomen with quick forceful upward thrusts at a 45-degree angle. This will force out the remaining air in their chest and help bring up the object. </li><li>Repeat thrusts until the object is expelled from the airway or the child becomes unresponsive. </li></ol> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Infant back blows</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_infant_back_blows_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Giving back blows to infant held face-down on a person’s knee" /> </figure> <h3>If your child is under one year old</h3><p>In a seated or kneeling position, place your child face-down on your knees or resting on your forearm. Support the child’s head and jaw with your hand. Using the heel of your hand, give up to five firm back blows between the child’s shoulder blades. Deliver each slap with sufficient force to attempt to dislodge the object.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Infant chest compressions</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_infant_chest_compressions_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="Performing chest compressions on infant lying on their back" /> </figure> <p>After giving 5 back blows, if your child is still not breathing, turn them carefully onto their back, continuing to support their neck and head, and place two fingers over the lower breast bone, just below the nipple-line. Using your fingers, perform five quick chest compressions. Alternate between back blows and chest compressions. </p><p>If your infant becomes unresponsive, perform CPR, making sure to look into the mouth for the obstruction prior to attempting to provide a breath. If you are alone and 911 has not yet been activated, carry your infant with you to the phone and call 911 as you continue CPR. Continue CPR until help arrives or your child begins to breathe on their own. If your child is breathing but not yet “awake” or responsive, position them on their side and monitor them until help arrives.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/choking_child_heimlich_standing_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpgChoking: First aidFalse

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