Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIANNon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIANon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIAEnglishRheumatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2017-01-31T05:00:00ZJennifer Stinson RN-EC, PhD, CPNPLori Tucker, MDAdam Huber, MSc, MD, FRCPCMichael Rapoff, PhDShirley Tse, MD, FRCPCLynn Spiegel, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.0000000000000568.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page describes the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as first-line treatment of arthritis. It lists the different NSAIDs available and their side effects.</p><p>Most children and teenagers with JIA are treated first with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These are called first-line medications because they are usually the first type of medication a doctor will use to treat JIA. These medications do not contain steroids.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>NSAIDs decrease inflammation and help reduce pain, swelling and stiffness in joints.</li> <li>Your child may need to try several different NSAIDs before they find one that works right for them.</li> <li>Common side effects include stomach upset such as pain and nausea.</li></ul>
Anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) pour l'AIJAAnti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) pour l'AIJNon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIAFrenchRheumatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2017-01-31T05:00:00ZJennifer Stinson RN-EC, PhD, CPNP Lori Tucker, MD Adam Huber, MSc, MD, FRCPC Michael Rapoff, PhD Shirley Tse, MD, FRCPC Lynn Spiegel, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.00000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page décrit l'utilisation d'anti inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) comme traitement de premiére ligne pour l'arthrite. On y présente une liste des différents AINS disponibles et de leurs effets secondaires.</p><h2>Que sont les anti inflammatoires non stéroïdiens?</h2> <p>La plupart des enfants et adolescents atteints d'AIJ sont tout d'abord traités avec des anti inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS). On les appelle médicaments de premiére ligne parce qu'ils sont habituellement le premier type de médicament utilisé par un médecin pour traiter l'arthrite. Ces médicaments ne contiennent pas de stéroïdiens.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les AINS réduisent l’inflammation et contribuent à soulager la douleur, l’enflure et la raideur dans les articulations.</li> <li>Il se peut que votre enfant doive essayer plusieurs AINS avant de trouver celui qui lui convient.</li> <li>Les AINS ont pour effets secondaires habituels des problèmes d’estomac comme des douleurs ou de la nausée.</li></ul>

 

 

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIA1069.00000000000Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIANon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIANEnglishRheumatologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemDrug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2017-01-31T05:00:00ZJennifer Stinson RN-EC, PhD, CPNPLori Tucker, MDAdam Huber, MSc, MD, FRCPCMichael Rapoff, PhDShirley Tse, MD, FRCPCLynn Spiegel, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000069.0000000000000568.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page describes the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as first-line treatment of arthritis. It lists the different NSAIDs available and their side effects.</p><p>Most children and teenagers with JIA are treated first with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These are called first-line medications because they are usually the first type of medication a doctor will use to treat JIA. These medications do not contain steroids.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>NSAIDs decrease inflammation and help reduce pain, swelling and stiffness in joints.</li> <li>Your child may need to try several different NSAIDs before they find one that works right for them.</li> <li>Common side effects include stomach upset such as pain and nausea.</li></ul><h2>How do NSAIDs work? </h2> <span class="asset-image-title">How do anti-inflammatory medicines work?</span> <p>As you have already learned, JIA is joint inflammation. NSAIDs decrease the chemicals that cause inflammation and help to reduce pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints. These drugs can help your child to participate in normal day-to-day activities. It might take between eight to 12 weeks to see improvement.</p><p>To learn more about how NSAIDs work, check out the animation at the right.</p><p>One of the benefits of NSAIDs is that their effect on your child's pain, stiffness and swelling will not wear out over time.</p><p>The following are NSAIDs commonly used to treat JIA.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>NSAID generic name</th><th>Most common brand name</th><th>How it is given</th><th>How the medication comes</th><th>Side effects</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td><a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">Naproxen</a></td><td>Naprosyn</td><td>By mouth, twice daily</td><td>Liquid or pill</td><td rowspan="7"><p> <strong>Common:</strong></p><ul><li>Stomach upset (pain, nausea)</li></ul><ul><p> <strong>Less common:</strong></p><li>Vomiting, diarrhea or constipation</li><li>Bloody or tarry black stools</li><li>Severe abdominal pain from stomach ulcers</li><li>Dizziness, drowsiness, headaches</li><li>Rash, hives or itching</li><li>Fragility and scarring of the skin</li><li>Nosebleeds, bleeding gums, easy bruising</li><li>Anemia, mild abnormalities in liver or kidney function</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td> <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">Ibuprofen</a></td><td>Advil; Motrin</td><td>By mouth, 3-4 times daily</td><td>Liquid or pill</td></tr><tr><td>Indomethacin</td><td>Indocid</td><td>By mouth, 3 times daily</td><td>Liquid or pill</td></tr><tr><td>Diclofenac sodium</td><td>Voltaren</td><td>By mouth, 1-2 times daily</td><td>Pill</td></tr><tr><td>Piroxicam</td><td>Feldene</td><td>By mouth, once daily</td><td>Pill</td></tr><tr><td>Celecoxib</td><td>Celebrex</td><td>By mouth, twice daily</td><td>Pill</td></tr><tr><td>Meloxicam</td><td>Mobicox</td><td>By mouth, once daily</td><td>Pill</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Important safety points about taking NSAIDs</h2><ul><li>NSAIDs should always be taken with food. This can make it easier on the stomach.</li><li>One rare side effect of NSAIDs is stomach ulcers. If your child develops persistent stomach upset with NSAID medication, talk to their doctor. The doctor may prescribe a drug to help protect the stomach from developing ulcers. Signs of an ulcer may include vomiting blood or passing a bloody or black stool. If this occurs, you should stop giving your child NSAIDs and see the doctor immediately.</li><li>The doctor may order blood and urine tests when your child goes to the clinic to make sure that the medication is not causing any problems in the body that your child might not feel.</li><li>If your child needs to take another medication for pain or fever, give acetaminophen (Tylenol). DO NOT GIVE another NSAID (like ibuprofen: Motrin or Advil) because then your child would be taking too much anti-inflammatory medication, leading to more side effects.</li></ul><h2>Tips for managing side effects of NSAIDs</h2><p>Have your child take NSAIDs with food. For example, try to pair giving pills with breakfast, lunch, or dinner. If they need to take your medications at school, have your child carry a small snack with them.</p><p>Some NSAIDs may make your child sun sensitive. Your child should use adequate sun protection, like sunscreen, while taking NSAIDs, especially if they are fair-skinned.</p>Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIA

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