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PKU transitions in the early yearsPPKU transitions in the early yearsPKU transitions in the early yearsEnglishMetabolicChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Small Intestine;Large Intestine/ColonDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZAnnette Feigenbaum, MB, ChB, FRCP;Guidelines designed by:;Elizabeth Kerr, PhD, Cpsych;Karen Sappleton, MSEd, MSW, RSW;with the PKU Team at The Hospital for Sick Children;In memory of Dr. Beverley J. Antle5.0000000000000078.0000000000000743.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children growing up with phenylketonuria (PKU) need to incorporate health care into their normal routines. Read about encouraging proper development. </p><p>Children go through many changes as they grow up, including how they think, what they like, and how they take care of themselves. Big changes are often called transitions. </p><p>A child must go through a transition in health care when they are diagnosed with PKU. The family and the health care team can help them learn good health care habits, the same way they help them learn other life skills. A child who learns good health care habits will probably have good health habits and attitudes all their life. </p><p>This page will help you think about age-appropriate goals for your child. It will give you ideas to help your child become more confident and independent in life and in their health care. It also includes extra goals for children with PKU. </p><p>Each child has different abilities from other children. Your child may surprise you with what they can do. Expect good things from your child and encourage them to expect the best from themselves. </p> ​<h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Babies and young children are learning new things every day. Encourage your child's development by playing with them and teaching them. </li> <li>As your child grows older, they can learn to do more things for themselves. Give them simple chores to do and encourage them to learn new things. </li> <li>Set up a routine for PKU care, and start teaching your child about "green light" or "go" foods. </li> </ul>
Phénylcétonurie – transitions dans les premières annéesPPhénylcétonurie – transitions dans les premières annéesPKU transitions in the early yearsFrenchMetabolicChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Small Intestine;Large Intestine/ColonDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZAnnette Feigenbaum, MB, ChB, FRCP;Guidelines designed by:;Elizabeth Kerr, PhD, Cpsych;Karen Sappleton, MSEd, MSW, RSW;with the PKU Team at The Hospital for Sick Children;In memory of Dr. Beverley J. Antle5.0000000000000078.0000000000000743.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les enfants qui grandissent avec la phénylcétonurie (PCU) doivent incorporer les soins de santé à leur routine normale. Vous en apprendrez davantage sur des moyens d’encourager un développement normal. </p><p>Les enfants passent de nombreux changements quand ils grandissent, y compris comment ils pensent, ce qu’ils aiment et comment ils prennent soin d’eux-mêmes. Ces changements importants sont souvent appelés transitions.</p><p>Un enfant doit passer par une transition en matière de soin de santé quand on diagnostique chez lui la phénylcétonurie (PCU). La famille et l’équipe de soignants peuvent l’aider à acquérir de bonnes habitudes saines, de la même manière qu’elles peuvent l’aider à apprendre d’autres aptitudes de vie. Un enfant qui acquère de bonnes habitudes saines les conservera probablement toute sa vie.</p><p>Cette page vous aidera à établir des objectifs adaptés à l’âge de votre enfant. Elle vous donnera des idées pour aider votre enfant à avoir confiance en lui et à être indépendant dans la vie et dans ses soins. Elle comprend aussi d’autres objectifs pour les enfants atteints de PCU.</p><p>Chaque enfant a des habiletés différentes des autres. Votre enfant pourrait vous surprendre par ce qu’il peut faire. Attendez-vous à de grandes choses de la part de votre enfant et encouragez-le à faire de son mieux.</p><br><h2>À ret​e​nir</h2> <ul> <li>Les bébés et les jeunes enfants apprennent de nouvelles choses tous les jours. Encouragez le développement de votre enfant en jouant avec lui et en lui enseignant des choses.</li> <li>À mesure que votre enfant grandit, il pourra apprendre à faire plus de choses lui-même. Donnez-lui des tâches simples à faire et encouragez-le à apprendre de nouvelles choses.</li> <li>Établissez une routine pour les soins, et commencez à enseigner à votre enfant les aliments qu’il peut manger sans restriction. </li> </ul>

 

 

PKU transitions in the early years1133.00000000000PKU transitions in the early yearsPKU transitions in the early yearsPEnglishMetabolicChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Small Intestine;Large Intestine/ColonDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZAnnette Feigenbaum, MB, ChB, FRCP;Guidelines designed by:;Elizabeth Kerr, PhD, Cpsych;Karen Sappleton, MSEd, MSW, RSW;with the PKU Team at The Hospital for Sick Children;In memory of Dr. Beverley J. Antle5.0000000000000078.0000000000000743.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children growing up with phenylketonuria (PKU) need to incorporate health care into their normal routines. Read about encouraging proper development. </p><p>Children go through many changes as they grow up, including how they think, what they like, and how they take care of themselves. Big changes are often called transitions. </p><p>A child must go through a transition in health care when they are diagnosed with PKU. The family and the health care team can help them learn good health care habits, the same way they help them learn other life skills. A child who learns good health care habits will probably have good health habits and attitudes all their life. </p><p>This page will help you think about age-appropriate goals for your child. It will give you ideas to help your child become more confident and independent in life and in their health care. It also includes extra goals for children with PKU. </p><p>Each child has different abilities from other children. Your child may surprise you with what they can do. Expect good things from your child and encourage them to expect the best from themselves. </p> ​<h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Babies and young children are learning new things every day. Encourage your child's development by playing with them and teaching them. </li> <li>As your child grows older, they can learn to do more things for themselves. Give them simple chores to do and encourage them to learn new things. </li> <li>Set up a routine for PKU care, and start teaching your child about "green light" or "go" foods. </li> </ul><h2>Birth to two years old</h2> <h3>Parenting</h3> <p>Help your child develop their sense of independence by letting them explore by mouth, touch and crawling.</p> <p>Help your child develop trust by making their surroundings safe.</p> <p>Begin to set limits with your child.</p> <p>Take short breaks from your child to renew your energy.</p> <h3>Social</h3> <p>Take part in community activities like the Early Years Program.</p> <p>Take your child to playgrounds and parks.</p> <p>Talk with parents of other children with PKU and with parents whose children do not have PKU.</p> <h3>Cognitive (learning) development</h3> <p>Encourage situations where your child can learn by looking, touching and mouthing.</p> <p>Help your child imagine things and keep images in their mind by playing games like peek-a-boo.</p> <p>Help your child learn words by talking about and naming things around you.</p> <h3>Life skills</h3> <p>By age two, begin to teach your child everyday skills like brushing teeth and getting dressed.</p> <p>Give your child very simple chores, for example, "Go get your shoes."</p> <p>Teach your child what "no" means. This will be helpful when they are older.</p> <h3>PKU care</h3> <p>Take blood spots once a week until your child is two years old.</p> <p>Visit the PKU clinic to see the dietitian and nurse when you need to. Contact them for results of blood spots.</p> <p>Keep a record of your child's diet and PHE levels.</p> <p>Follow the special diet prescribed by the dietitian.</p> <p>Ask questions to be sure you understand what is happening.</p> <h2>Three to five years old</h2> <h3>Parenting</h3> <p>Help your child learn to make decisions by giving them choices when possible.</p> <p>Let your child start to develop their own sense of who they are.</p> <p>Teach your child what happens as a result of how they act or choices they make.</p> <p>Teach "good touch" and "bad touch" near age five.</p> <h3>Social</h3> <p>Take part in programs offered in your community, such as story time at the library.</p> <p>Let your child learn what they like to do by trying different activities.</p> <p>Invite families with children your child's age to your home to play.</p> <h3>Cognitive (learning) development</h3> <p>Encourage your child to picture in their mind recent events or things they enjoy.</p> <p>Help your child to communicate by using letters and colours and by labelling things.</p> <p>Encourage development through play.</p> <h3>Life skills</h3> <p>Give your child simple errands and simple chores.</p> <p>Encourage self-care, such as brushing teeth and picking up toys, with reminders or help.</p> <p>Help your child learn not to do things that will harm themselves or others. For example, teach them not to touch a hot stove, run into the street or hit other people. </p> <h3>PKU care</h3> <p>Take blood spots every two weeks. Set up a routine for doing blood spots at home, so you always do them on the same day and time. </p> <p>Contact the dietitian or nurse for blood work results.</p> <p>Tell your child that they have PKU and that you go to clinic to take care of their health.</p> <p>Identify "green light" or "go" foods. Low-protein foods are best. Encourage your child to drink medical food as prescribed by the dietitian. </p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PKU_transitions_early_years.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/PKU_transitions_early_years.jpgPKU transitions in the early years

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