How to involve your child in their health careHHow to involve your child in their health careHow to involve your child in their health careEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-12-19T05:00:00ZNA7.0000000000000071.0000000000000594.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children and teens are often interested in being included in discussions about their health care. Talk to them open and honestly about their condition.</p><p>​​From an early age, children start thinking about how their bodies work and usually have lots of questions. These questions may get more complicated when a child gets older and can better express themselves. Sometimes, though, a child's questions might reveal how little they really understand about their condition or treatment.</p><p>Talking regularly to your child about their health can help ease any fears and allow them share any concerns. It can also help make sure that they understand their treatment and why they need it.</p>​<h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Start talking to your child as early as possible about their condition, in words that they understand.</li> <li>Ask your child what they already know or would like to find out.</li> <li>Check back with your child about how much they want to be involved in their health care. All children have a right to be involved, but some might not want this.</li> <li>Be open and honest with your child. This will help build trust and avoid any "surprises" later on.</li> <li>Work with your child and your child's health care team to make decisions about health care.</li> </ul>
Comment faire participer votre enfant à ses soins de santéCComment faire participer votre enfant à ses soins de santéHow to involve your child in their health careFrenchNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-12-19T05:00:00ZnaFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les enfants et les adolescents veulent souvent être inclus dans les discussions portant sur leurs soins de santé. Discutez avec eux de leur trouble de manière ouverte et franche.</p><p>Dès leur plus jeune âge, les enfants s’interrogent sur la façon dont leur corps fonctionne et ils ont habituellement beaucoup de questions. Ces questions peuvent devenir plus compliquées lorsque l’enfant vieillit et qu’il est en mesure de mieux s’exprimer. Parfois, les questions d’un enfant peuvent révéler à quel point il comprend peu son trouble ou son traitement.</p><p>Discuter de façon régulière avec votre enfant à propos de sa santé peut aider à apaiser ses craintes et lui permet de verbaliser ses inquiétudes. Cela permet aussi de s’assurer qu’il comprend son traitement et la raison pour laquelle il en a besoin.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Commencez à discuter avec votre enfant de son trouble à un âge aussi précoce que possible en employant des mots qu’il peut comprendre.</li> <li>Demandez à votre enfant ce qu’il connaît déjà et ce qu’il aimerait découvrir.</li><li>Vérifiez avec votre enfant afin de savoir à quel point il veut être impliqué dans ses soins de santé. Tous les enfants ont le droit de participer, mais certains pourraient ne pas le vouloir.</li><li>Soyez ouvert et franc avec votre enfant afin d’établie la confiance et d’éviter des « mauvaises surprises » à l’avenir.</li><li>Travaillez de concert avec votre enfant et son équipe de soins de santé afin de prendre des décisions sur ses soins.</li></ul>

 

 

How to involve your child in their health care1157.00000000000How to involve your child in their health careHow to involve your child in their health careHEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-12-19T05:00:00ZNA7.0000000000000071.0000000000000594.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Children and teens are often interested in being included in discussions about their health care. Talk to them open and honestly about their condition.</p><p>​​From an early age, children start thinking about how their bodies work and usually have lots of questions. These questions may get more complicated when a child gets older and can better express themselves. Sometimes, though, a child's questions might reveal how little they really understand about their condition or treatment.</p><p>Talking regularly to your child about their health can help ease any fears and allow them share any concerns. It can also help make sure that they understand their treatment and why they need it.</p>​<h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Start talking to your child as early as possible about their condition, in words that they understand.</li> <li>Ask your child what they already know or would like to find out.</li> <li>Check back with your child about how much they want to be involved in their health care. All children have a right to be involved, but some might not want this.</li> <li>Be open and honest with your child. This will help build trust and avoid any "surprises" later on.</li> <li>Work with your child and your child's health care team to make decisions about health care.</li> </ul><h2>Start early</h2><p>Children and teens believe that they need to be included in health care discussions from a young age. <a href="/Article?contentid=1141&language=English">Talk to your child</a> about any health condition as early as possible. Even young children (toddlers and pre-schoolers) need a chance to understand what is going on and share their thoughts.</p><h2>Check what they already know or want to find out</h2><p>Your child's age and life experience will naturally affect how much they understand about their health. If they have an illness, check what they already know about it and ask them if they want to learn more.</p><h2>"Check in" often</h2><p>If your child is getting treatment, have regular talks to find out how involved they want to be in their care. Children have a right to take part in conversations with their doctor about their health, but not all children might want this or be old enough for it. Sometimes children will change their mind during treatment. For instance, older children and teens might want to start having a more active role by meeting their health care team on their own now and then.</p><p>Giving your child some options will help them feel more in control of what is happening to them.</p><h2>Be open and honest</h2><p>If your child has a complex health condition, talk to them about it openly and honestly, in words they understand. At the same time, don't overload your child with information, as this might confuse or scare them. It may also be important to repeat information now and again to make sure your child understands what is happening.</p><p>When a child knows about their health, they are more likely to trust the adults who are caring for them. By talking to your child, you will also prevent any upsetting "surprises" down the road.</p><h2>Help distract your child during tests</h2><p>Medical procedures such as tests or needles can often be unpleasant for children. Consider giving them a choice of activities to distract their attention. This will help them cope better with any fear or <a href="/Article?contentid=1141&language=English">pain</a>.</p><p>Young children might like reading a story or playing games, while older children may prefer listening to music or using some distraction and relaxation techniques.</p><h2>Work with your child's health care team</h2><p>Children and teens rely heavily on parents and health professionals to help them make decisions about their health care. Research shows that things turn out better for everyone when families, doctors and patients work together.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_to_involve_your_child_in_their_healthcare.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_to_involve_your_child_in_their_healthcare.jpgHow to involve your child in their health care

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