Visiting your brother or sister at the hospitalVVisiting your brother or sister at the hospitalVisiting your brother or sister at the hospitalEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesChild (0-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZKimberly O'Leary, MEd;Jessica Miller, CCLS, MA;Ceilidh Eaton Russell, BA, CLSt. Dip., CCLS;Barbara Neilson, MSW, Res. Dip. SW, RSW5.0000000000000082.0000000000000844.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page has advice for kids visiting a brother or sister in the hospital. </p><h2>What to expect and how you can help</h2>​ <p>This page explains what to expect when you are visiting your brother or sister in the hospital. It also explains what you can do to help your brother or sister get well.</p><h3>Fill in the blanks</h3><p>My name is ____________________ .</p><p>I am __________ years old.</p><p>My brother or sister's name is ____________________ .</p><p>They are __________ years old.</p><p>These pages have ideas for things to do for your brother or sister, and yourself, too. If there is anything you want to know more about, you can ask the nurses and doctors. It is their job to answer your questions.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>You may see a lot of things such as equipment and machines at the hospital that you have never seen before.</li><li>You may have a lot of questions about what is happening to your sibling. This is okay, it is a good idea to ask questions and talk about your worries.</li><li>Think of something that you can do for your sibling that will help them feel more at home.</li> </ul><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>Child life staff can be reached at 416-813-6216.</p>
Rendre visite à son frère ou à sa sœur à l’hôpitalRRendre visite à son frère ou à sa sœur à l’hôpitalVisiting your brother or sister at the hospitalFrenchNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesChild (0-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZKimberly O'Leary, MEd;Jessica Miller, CCLS, MA;Ceilidh Eaton Russell, BA, CLSt. Dip., CCLS;Barbara Neilson, MSW, Res. Dip. SW, RSW5.0000000000000082.0000000000000844.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page offre des conseils pour rendre visite à un frère ou une sœur à l’hôpital.</p><h2>À quoi s’attendre et comment aider?</h2><p>Cette page décrit ce à quoi vous pouvez vous attendre lorsque vous rendez visite à votre frère ou votre sœur à l’hôpital. Elle explique également comment vous pouvez les aider à aller mieux.</p><h3>Remplissez les blancs :<br></h3><p>Je m’appelle ____________________.: </p><p>J’ai __________ ans.</p><p>Le nom de mon frère ou de ma sœur est : ____________________ .</p><p>Il ou elle a __________ ans.</p><p>Les pages qui suivent présentent des idées de choses que vous pouvez faire pour votre frère ou sœur, et pour vous-même. Si vous voulez savoir quoique ce soit, demandez aux infirmiers et aux médecins. Ils sont là pour répondre à vos questions.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>À l’hôpital, vous verrez probablement beaucoup d’éléments nouveaux comme de l’équipement et des appareils.</li><li>Vous pourriez avoir beaucoup de questions à poser sur ce qui se passe avec votre frère ou votre sœur. C’est correct et même une bonne idée de poser des questions et de parler de vos préoccupations.</li><li>Pensez à ce que vous pourriez faire pour votre frère ou votre sœur pour l’aider à se sentir plus comme à la maison.</li></ul> <h2>À l’hôpital SickKids :</h2> <p>Les éducateurs en mileu pédiatrique peuvent être joints au 416-813-6216.</p>

 

 

Visiting your brother or sister at the hospital1165.00000000000Visiting your brother or sister at the hospitalVisiting your brother or sister at the hospitalVEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesChild (0-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NA2010-03-17T04:00:00ZKimberly O'Leary, MEd;Jessica Miller, CCLS, MA;Ceilidh Eaton Russell, BA, CLSt. Dip., CCLS;Barbara Neilson, MSW, Res. Dip. SW, RSW5.0000000000000082.0000000000000844.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page has advice for kids visiting a brother or sister in the hospital. </p><h2>What to expect and how you can help</h2>​ <p>This page explains what to expect when you are visiting your brother or sister in the hospital. It also explains what you can do to help your brother or sister get well.</p><h3>Fill in the blanks</h3><p>My name is ____________________ .</p><p>I am __________ years old.</p><p>My brother or sister's name is ____________________ .</p><p>They are __________ years old.</p><p>These pages have ideas for things to do for your brother or sister, and yourself, too. If there is anything you want to know more about, you can ask the nurses and doctors. It is their job to answer your questions.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>You may see a lot of things such as equipment and machines at the hospital that you have never seen before.</li><li>You may have a lot of questions about what is happening to your sibling. This is okay, it is a good idea to ask questions and talk about your worries.</li><li>Think of something that you can do for your sibling that will help them feel more at home.</li> </ul><figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Things you may see at the hospital</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hospital_equipment_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Please ask about any of these things if you have questions about them.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>At the hospital</h2><p>The hospital can be a strange place at first. You might see things you have never seen before. You may also hear people using words you have not heard before. As time goes on, you will get more comfortable being at the hospital visiting your brother or sister. </p><h2>People at the hospital</h2><p>Lots of people are looking after your brother or sister. Part of what they do is to let you and your family know what is happening with your brother or sister. </p><p>At the hospital, a team of people are helping your brother or sister get well.</p><p>You are a very important part of this team, because how people feel can help them get better. When people feel happy, wanted and missed, they tend to get better faster. If you can help your brother or sister feel happier, you are helping them get better. </p><h2>Your feelings</h2><p>Having a brother or sister in the hospital can make you and others in the family worry about things. Often, kids ask themselves these questions: </p><ul><li>What is happening to my brother/sister?</li><li>Is he/she going to get better?</li><li>Is it my fault?</li><li>Could it happen to me, too </li><li>Who will take care of me?</li><li>What will I tell people at school?</li></ul><p>If you have asked yourself any of these questions, do not worry. These questions are normal.</p><p>It is a good idea to talk about these worries and ask any questions you may have. Sometimes people feel afraid to tell their family what they are worried about. Even though there are some things that are hard to talk about, it usually feels better after you have talked about them. You will probably even find out that other people have the same feelings as you do. </p><p>Child life specialists and social workers are great people to talk to about how you feel.</p><p>You can also write in a journal or diary or do some art work to help with how you are feeling.</p><h2>What you can do to help your brother or sister get better</h2><p>What kinds of things do you and your brother or sister like to do together? Can you do any of these things in the hospital?</p><p>Some kids say they felt better when they did things that made the hospital feel like home.</p><p>Here are some ideas you can do to help you and your brother or sister feel more comfortable and have fun. It is an important job. </p><ul><li>Paint, draw or do arts and crafts to help decorate your brother or sister's room. </li><li>Write a story or a letter to say how you are feeling or how things are going at home. Make sure you tell your brother or sister about new things that are happening in your neighbourhood or at home. If your family has pets, your brother or sister will want to know how they are doing too. </li><li>Gather up some toys, books, music or videos that your brother or sister would like to have in their hospital room. Sharing a special toy or game with your brother or sister might make them feel better. </li><li>Choose a toy or something of your own that has helped you feel better and that might help your brother or sister feel better too. </li><li>Send a special picture or photo along with a note. </li><li>Make an audio or video recording of yourself talking, telling a story, taking a walk or doing something that your brother or sister would like to do. </li><li>Call your brother or sister on the phone. </li><li>Tell your brother or sister that they are missed at home. </li><li>You can make up your own ideas too. </li></ul><h2>Your space</h2><p>You can use this space to write questions you would like to ask, or any new feelings you might have.</p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p>Here are some feeling faces. When you think about your brother or sister, how do you feel?</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/feeling_faces_MISC_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>Child life staff can be reached at 416-813-6216.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/visiting_your_brother_sister_at_hospital.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/visiting_your_brother_sister_at_hospital.jpgVisiting your brother or sister at the hospital

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