Immunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is loweredIImmunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is loweredImmunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is loweredEnglishImmunologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-01-23T05:00:00ZNA8.0000000000000062.00000000000001448.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>If your child has a low immune system learn how to protect them against infection.</p><h2>What is immunosupression?</h2><p>Infections in children are common. They can contract infections both inside and outside the home. When a child gets an infection, the immune system usually works to fight it off. Some medicines or diseases can weaken the immune system (immunosupression). When the immune system is weak, a child is more vulnerable to infection. They will also have a difficult time recovering. </p><p>If your child is on a medicine that lowers her immune system, it is important to protect against infection as much as possible. You may not be able to prevent your child from getting an infection. However, following these steps may reduce the risk.</p><h2>Key points </h2> <ul> <li>Be aware of possible sources of infection and protect your child against infection as much as possible.</li> <li>Hand washing is the most important step in preventing the spread of infections.</li> <li>Keep your house clean and prepare and store food safely. </li> <li>Limit your child's exposure to people with infection, pets, and second-hand smoke.</li> <li>Ensure all family members are immunized.</li> <li>Know what to do if your child gets an infection.</li> </ul><h2>What do I do if my child gets an infection?</h2> <p>If your child has any of the following, contact your paediatrician or family doctor within 24 hours. Go to the local emergency department or walk-in clinic if your doctor is unavailable.</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a>. An oral temperature of 38.3°C or a temperature of 38°C that lasts for one hour or more. It also includes temperature under the arm of 37.8°C or a temperature of 37.5°C that last for one hour or more. It is not recommended to use a thermometer that is placed in the ear.</li> <li>Cough, runny nose, breathing problems</li> <li>Nausea, <a href="/article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or loss of appetite</li> <li><a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">Diarrhea</a> (loose, watery, foul smelling bowel movements)</li> <li>Foul smelling urine, pain when voiding (peeing), frequent voiding</li> <li>Thrush (white specks in the mouth or on the diaper area)</li> <li>Rash</li> <li>Increased sleepiness</li> </ul> <h2>What do I do if my child comes into contact with someone who has chickenpox?</h2> <p>Your child may need to take the treatment called Varicella Zoster Immune Globulin (VZIG). VZIG has a large number of antibodies to help prevent chickenpox. It is given by injection (a needle). A health care professional must give your child VZIG within 96 hours (four days) of the exposure to chickenpox. If your child comes into contact with chickenpox, call your health care team to discuss whether your child needs VZIG. This is particularly important if your child has been in contact with the infected person (family member, classmate or playmate) for 1 hour or more indoors. Very close contact outdoors (e.g., playing with another child in a sandbox) can also place your child at risk. If your child gets chickenpox, they may need to take a medicine that makes it less serious. </p><h2>Practice and promote good hand washing<br></h2> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Suppository_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Recent studies have found that <a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">hand washing</a> is the most important step in preventing the spread of infections. Hand washing is especially important after:</p><ul><li>using the toilet</li><li>changing diapers</li><li>handling garbage<br></li><li>using a cleaning cloth or soiled dishcloth</li><li>handling raw food (meat, eggs)</li><li>touching a pet</li><li>blowing or touching the nose</li><li>contact with other body fluids such as vomit or blood</li></ul><p>As soon as someone enters your home, ask them to immediately wash their hands or use a hand sanitizer. Anyone who has <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water. Always wash your hands before:</p><ul><li>touching your child</li><li>preparing food</li><li>eating</li></ul><h2>Keep your home clean</h2><ul><li>Dust and vacuum your house weekly.</li><li>Wash your child's bed linens, bathroom towels, and pajamas at least once a week.</li><li>Wash all dishes and utensils in hot water or in the dishwasher.</li><li>Wash surfaces in common areas such as the bathroom, kitchen, and living room with a disinfectant. Pay particular attention to surfaces that are touched frequently such as handles on doors, the refrigerator, the oven, cupboards, sink taps, toilet handles and seat, telephones, and computers. Clean these surfaces regularly.</li><li>Clean toys before your child touches them.</li><li>Do not use humidifiers unless you clean them daily.</li></ul><h2>Limit contact with those who have an infection</h2><p>The following suggestions are for children with severe immunosuppression. These are not required for all children receiving immunosuppressive treatment. Talk to your child's health care team and ask if you need to take these precautions:</p><ul><li>Keep your child away from crowds. Try to avoid stores, markets, parties, etc.</li><li>Keep your child out of daycare and group play activities during the treatment period.</li><li>Avoid communal play areas such as play parks, sandboxes, and public swimming pools.</li><li>Limit sharing of household items such as toys, towels, drinking glasses, and eating utensils.</li><li>All visitors should be screened for illness. They should not visit if they are sick or have recently been directly exposed to someone who is sick. In the event that this cannot be avoided, the sick family member should wash their hands thoroughly before coming in direct contact with your child.</li><li>If you must be in a public place, use a plastic cover on the stroller and choose times when there is less likely to be crowds. An older child may wear a mask.</li><li>When at a clinic, doctor's office or medical lab, advise them of your child's lowered immune system and request to be put in a room right away or ask for an appointment at the beginning or end of the day. Avoid waiting rooms as much as possible.</li></ul> <h2>Ensure family members are immunized</h2><p>Immunizations reduce the risk of many serious infections. Family members you live with should update their immunizations. This includes having annual flu vaccines. Immunizations make it less likely they will get sick and expose your child to one of these serious infections.<br></p><p>In general, it is safe for family members to be vaccinated during your child's treatment period. However, be cautious with two vaccines:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=760&language=English">Chickenpox (varicella)</a>: About 5% of people who receive this vaccine develop a rash. If this happens, your child'should avoid contact with this person. Also contact your child's doctor because your child may need treatment to prevent infection.</li><li>Rotavirus: It is possible that people who receive this vaccine may have live virus in their feces. If a family member receives the rotavirus vaccine, wash hands thoroughly and often.</li></ul><p>Try to have your child's vaccinations updated four to six weeks before starting treatment. It is safe for your child to have 'inactivated' vaccines while immunosuppressed. However, they may not work well. The vaccine may need to be repeated at a later date. Talk to your child's health care team before your child has any vaccinations.</p><p>For more information, see <a href="/Article?contentid=1987&language=English">Immunizations for Children and Teens with Suppressed Immune Systems</a>.</p>
Immunosuppression : protéger votre enfant contre l'infection lorsque le système immunitaire est affaibliIImmunosuppression : protéger votre enfant contre l'infection lorsque le système immunitaire est affaibliImmunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is loweredFrenchImmunologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2012-01-23T05:00:00ZNAHealth (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les parents apprennent à protéger leur enfant ayant un système immunitaire affaibli des infections.</p><p>Les infections chez les enfants sont fréquentes. Ils peuvent contracter des infections autant à l'intérieur qu’à l'extérieur de la maison. Lorsqu'un enfant contracte une infection, le système immunitaire tente habituellement de la combattre. Certains médicaments ou maladies peuvent affaiblir le système immunitaire (immunosuppression). Lorsque le système immunitaire est faible, un enfant est plus vulnérable à l'infection. Sa guérison sera plus difficile. Si votre enfant prend un médicament qui affaiblit son système immunitaire, il est important de le protéger autant que possible contre l'infection. Vous ne pouvez peut-être pas empêcher votre enfant d'attraper une infection. Toutefois, ces étapes peuvent en réduire le risque.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Soyez conscient des sources possibles d'infection et protégez votre enfant contre l'infection autant que possible.</li><li>Le lavage des mains est l'étape la plus importante dans la prévention de la propagation des infections.</li><li>Gardez votre maison propre et préparez et conservez les aliments en toute sécurité.</li><li>Limitez l'exposition de votre enfant aux personnes infectées, aux animaux de compagnie et à la fumée secondaire.</li><li>Assurez-vous que tous les membres de la famille sont vaccinés.</li><li>Sachez quoi faire si votre enfant contracte une infection.</li></ul><h2>Que dois-je faire si mon enfant contracte une infection?</h2><p>Si votre enfant présente l'un des symptômes suivants, communiquez avec votre pédiatre ou votre médecin de famille dans les 24 heures. Si votre médecin n'est pas disponible, rendez-vous au service d'urgence local ou à la clinique sans rendez-vous.</p><ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">Fièvre</a>. Une température buccale de 38,3°C ou une température de 38°C qui dure une heure ou plus. Cela inclut également la température sous le bras de 37,8°C ou une température de 37,5°C qui dure une heure ou plus. Il n'est pas recommandé d'utiliser un thermomètre placé dans l'oreille.</li><li>Toux, écoulement nasal, problèmes respiratoires</li><li>Nausées, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=French">vomissements</a> ou perte d'appétit</li><li><a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=French">Diarrhée</a> (selles molles, liquides et nauséabondes)</li><li>Mauvaise odeur d'urine, douleur lors de mictions (urine), miction fréquente</li><li>Muguet (taches blanches dans la bouche ou sur les fesses)</li><li>Éruption cutanée</li><li>Somnolence accrue</li></ul><h2>Que dois-je faire si mon enfant entre en contact avec une personne qui a la varicelle?</h2><p>Il se peut que votre enfant doive prendre le traitement appelé immunoglobulines antivaricelleuses (VZIG). Les VZIG ont un grand nombre d'anticorps pour aider à prévenir la varicelle. Il est donné par injection (par aiguille). Un professionnel de la santé doit administrer les VZIG à votre enfant dans les 96 heures (4 jours) suivant l'exposition à la varicelle. Si votre enfant entre en contact avec la varicelle, appelez votre équipe de soins de santé pour savoir si votre enfant a besoin de VZIG. Ceci est particulièrement important si votre enfant a été en contact avec la personne infectée (membre de la famille, camarade de classe ou camarade de jeu) pendant 1 heure ou plus à l'intérieur. Un contact très rapproché à l'extérieur (par ex. jouer avec un autre enfant dans un bac à sable) peut également mettre votre enfant en danger. Si votre enfant attrape la varicelle, il se peut qu'il doive prendre un médicament qui atténue l’incidence du virus.</p><h2>Adoptez et encouragez un lavage des mains efficace</h2> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Suppository_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Des études récentes ont démontré que le <a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=French">lavage des mains</a> constitue l'étape la plus importante dans la prévention de la propagation des infections. Le lavage des mains est particulièrement important après :</p><ul><li>l’utilisation de la toilette</li><li>le changement des couches</li><li>la manipulation des ordures</li><li>l’utilisant un chiffon de nettoyage ou un torchon souillé</li><li>la manipulation des aliments crus (viande, œufs)</li><li>le contact avec un animal de compagnie</li><li>le fait se se moucher ou de toucher le nez</li><li>le contact avec d'autres fluides corporels tels que le vomi ou le sang</li></ul><p>Dès que quelqu'un entre dans votre maison, demandez-lui de se laver immédiatement les mains ou d'utiliser un désinfectant pour les mains. Toute personne qui a la <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhée</a> doit se laver soigneusement les mains avec du savon et de l'eau. Lavez-vous toujours les mains avant de :</p><ul><li>toucher votre enfant</li><li>préparer des aliments</li><li>manger</li></ul><h2>Gardez votre maison propre</h2><ul><li>Époussetez et passez l'aspirateur dans votre maison chaque semaine</li><li>Lavez la literie, les serviettes de bain et les pyjamas de votre enfant au moins une fois par semaine</li><li>Lavez toute la vaisselle et les ustensiles dans l'eau chaude ou dans le lave-vaisselle</li><li>Lavez les surfaces des espaces communs comme la salle de bain, la cuisine et le salon avec un désinfectant. Portez une attention particulière aux surfaces qui sont fréquemment touchées, comme les poignées des portes, le réfrigérateur, le four, les armoires, les robinets d'évier, les poignées et le siège des toilettes, les téléphones et les ordinateurs. Nettoyez régulièrement ces surfaces</li><li>Nettoyez les jouets avant que votre enfant ne les touche</li><li>N'utilisez pas d'humidificateurs à moins de les nettoyer quotidiennement</li></ul><h2>Limitez le contact avec ceux qui ont une infection</h2><p>Les suggestions suivantes concernent les enfants atteints d'immunodépression sévère. Elles ne sont pas requises pour tous les enfants recevant un traitement immunosuppresseur. Parlez à l'équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant et demandez si vous devez prendre ces précautions :</p><ul><li>Gardez votre enfant à l'écart des foules. Essayez d'éviter les magasins, les marchés, les fêtes, etc.</li><li>Gardez votre enfant à l'écart de la garderie et des activités de jeu en groupe pendant la période de traitement.</li><li>Évitez les aires de jeu communes telles que les parcs de jeu, les bacs à sable et les piscines publiques.</li><li>Limitez le partage d'articles ménagers tels que les jouets, les serviettes, les verres et les ustensiles de cuisine.</li><li>Aucun des visiteurs ne doit être malade. Ils ne devraient pas rendre visite à l’enfant s'ils sont malades ou s’ils ont récemment été directement exposés à une personne malade. Dans le cas où cela ne peut être évité, le membre de la famille malade doit se laver soigneusement les mains avant d'entrer en contact direct avec votre enfant.</li><li>Si vous devez être dans un lieu public, utilisez une housse en plastique sur la poussette et choisissez des moments où il y a moins de risque de foule. Un enfant plus âgé peut porter un masque.</li><li>Dans une clinique, un cabinet de médecin ou un laboratoire médical, informez le personnel du système immunitaire affaibli de votre enfant et demandez qu'on vous installe tout de suite dans une pièce ou demandez un rendez-vous au début ou à la fin de la journée. Évitez autant que possible les salles d'attente.</li></ul><h2>Assurez-vous que les membres de la famille sont vaccinés</h2><p>Les vaccins réduisent le risque de nombreuses infections graves. Les membres de votre famille avec qui vous vivez doivent mettre à jour leur dossier de vaccination. Cela implique de recevoir le vaccin annuel contre la grippe. Les vaccins diminuent le risque de tomber malade et d’exposer votre enfant à l'une de ces infections graves.</p><p>En général, il est sécuritaire de vacciner les membres de la famille pendant la période de traitement de votre enfant. Cependant, soyez prudent avec deux vaccins :</p><ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=760&language=French">Varicelle</a> : Environ 5% des personnes qui reçoivent ce vaccin développent une éruption cutanée. Si cela se produit, votre enfant devrait éviter tout contact avec cette personne. Contactez également le médecin de votre enfant, car celui-ci pourrait avoir besoin d'un traitement pour prévenir l'infection.</li><li>Rotavirus : Il est possible que les personnes qui reçoivent ce vaccin aient un virus vivant dans leurs selles. Si un membre de la famille reçoit le vaccin antirotavirus, il est important de se laver les mains soigneusement et souvent.</li></ul><p>Essayez de faire mettre à jour le dossier de vaccination de votre enfant 4 à 6 semaines avant de commencer le traitement. Il est sécuritaire pour votre enfant de recevoir des vaccins « inactivés » lorsqu'il est immunodéprimé. </p><p>Cependant, ils peuvent ne pas fonctionner correctement. Le vaccin devra peut-être être répété à une date ultérieure. Parlez à l'équipe de soins de santé de votre enfant avant que votre enfant ne soit vacciné.</p><p>Pour plus d'informations, lisez <a href="/Article?contentid=1987&language=French">Immunisations pour enfants et adolescents souffrant d’une immunodéficience</a>.</p>

 

 

Immunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is lowered1170.00000000000Immunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is loweredImmunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is loweredIEnglishImmunologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-01-23T05:00:00ZNA8.0000000000000062.00000000000001448.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>If your child has a low immune system learn how to protect them against infection.</p><h2>What is immunosupression?</h2><p>Infections in children are common. They can contract infections both inside and outside the home. When a child gets an infection, the immune system usually works to fight it off. Some medicines or diseases can weaken the immune system (immunosupression). When the immune system is weak, a child is more vulnerable to infection. They will also have a difficult time recovering. </p><p>If your child is on a medicine that lowers her immune system, it is important to protect against infection as much as possible. You may not be able to prevent your child from getting an infection. However, following these steps may reduce the risk.</p><h2>Key points </h2> <ul> <li>Be aware of possible sources of infection and protect your child against infection as much as possible.</li> <li>Hand washing is the most important step in preventing the spread of infections.</li> <li>Keep your house clean and prepare and store food safely. </li> <li>Limit your child's exposure to people with infection, pets, and second-hand smoke.</li> <li>Ensure all family members are immunized.</li> <li>Know what to do if your child gets an infection.</li> </ul><h2>What do I do if my child gets an infection?</h2> <p>If your child has any of the following, contact your paediatrician or family doctor within 24 hours. Go to the local emergency department or walk-in clinic if your doctor is unavailable.</p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a>. An oral temperature of 38.3°C or a temperature of 38°C that lasts for one hour or more. It also includes temperature under the arm of 37.8°C or a temperature of 37.5°C that last for one hour or more. It is not recommended to use a thermometer that is placed in the ear.</li> <li>Cough, runny nose, breathing problems</li> <li>Nausea, <a href="/article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> or loss of appetite</li> <li><a href="/article?contentid=7&language=English">Diarrhea</a> (loose, watery, foul smelling bowel movements)</li> <li>Foul smelling urine, pain when voiding (peeing), frequent voiding</li> <li>Thrush (white specks in the mouth or on the diaper area)</li> <li>Rash</li> <li>Increased sleepiness</li> </ul> <h2>What do I do if my child comes into contact with someone who has chickenpox?</h2> <p>Your child may need to take the treatment called Varicella Zoster Immune Globulin (VZIG). VZIG has a large number of antibodies to help prevent chickenpox. It is given by injection (a needle). A health care professional must give your child VZIG within 96 hours (four days) of the exposure to chickenpox. If your child comes into contact with chickenpox, call your health care team to discuss whether your child needs VZIG. This is particularly important if your child has been in contact with the infected person (family member, classmate or playmate) for 1 hour or more indoors. Very close contact outdoors (e.g., playing with another child in a sandbox) can also place your child at risk. If your child gets chickenpox, they may need to take a medicine that makes it less serious. </p><h2>Practice and promote good hand washing<br></h2> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Suppository_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Recent studies have found that <a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">hand washing</a> is the most important step in preventing the spread of infections. Hand washing is especially important after:</p><ul><li>using the toilet</li><li>changing diapers</li><li>handling garbage<br></li><li>using a cleaning cloth or soiled dishcloth</li><li>handling raw food (meat, eggs)</li><li>touching a pet</li><li>blowing or touching the nose</li><li>contact with other body fluids such as vomit or blood</li></ul><p>As soon as someone enters your home, ask them to immediately wash their hands or use a hand sanitizer. Anyone who has <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water. Always wash your hands before:</p><ul><li>touching your child</li><li>preparing food</li><li>eating</li></ul><h2>Keep your home clean</h2><ul><li>Dust and vacuum your house weekly.</li><li>Wash your child's bed linens, bathroom towels, and pajamas at least once a week.</li><li>Wash all dishes and utensils in hot water or in the dishwasher.</li><li>Wash surfaces in common areas such as the bathroom, kitchen, and living room with a disinfectant. Pay particular attention to surfaces that are touched frequently such as handles on doors, the refrigerator, the oven, cupboards, sink taps, toilet handles and seat, telephones, and computers. Clean these surfaces regularly.</li><li>Clean toys before your child touches them.</li><li>Do not use humidifiers unless you clean them daily.</li></ul><h2>Limit contact with those who have an infection</h2><p>The following suggestions are for children with severe immunosuppression. These are not required for all children receiving immunosuppressive treatment. Talk to your child's health care team and ask if you need to take these precautions:</p><ul><li>Keep your child away from crowds. Try to avoid stores, markets, parties, etc.</li><li>Keep your child out of daycare and group play activities during the treatment period.</li><li>Avoid communal play areas such as play parks, sandboxes, and public swimming pools.</li><li>Limit sharing of household items such as toys, towels, drinking glasses, and eating utensils.</li><li>All visitors should be screened for illness. They should not visit if they are sick or have recently been directly exposed to someone who is sick. In the event that this cannot be avoided, the sick family member should wash their hands thoroughly before coming in direct contact with your child.</li><li>If you must be in a public place, use a plastic cover on the stroller and choose times when there is less likely to be crowds. An older child may wear a mask.</li><li>When at a clinic, doctor's office or medical lab, advise them of your child's lowered immune system and request to be put in a room right away or ask for an appointment at the beginning or end of the day. Avoid waiting rooms as much as possible.</li></ul> <h2>Ensure family members are immunized</h2><p>Immunizations reduce the risk of many serious infections. Family members you live with should update their immunizations. This includes having annual flu vaccines. Immunizations make it less likely they will get sick and expose your child to one of these serious infections.<br></p><p>In general, it is safe for family members to be vaccinated during your child's treatment period. However, be cautious with two vaccines:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=760&language=English">Chickenpox (varicella)</a>: About 5% of people who receive this vaccine develop a rash. If this happens, your child'should avoid contact with this person. Also contact your child's doctor because your child may need treatment to prevent infection.</li><li>Rotavirus: It is possible that people who receive this vaccine may have live virus in their feces. If a family member receives the rotavirus vaccine, wash hands thoroughly and often.</li></ul><p>Try to have your child's vaccinations updated four to six weeks before starting treatment. It is safe for your child to have 'inactivated' vaccines while immunosuppressed. However, they may not work well. The vaccine may need to be repeated at a later date. Talk to your child's health care team before your child has any vaccinations.</p><p>For more information, see <a href="/Article?contentid=1987&language=English">Immunizations for Children and Teens with Suppressed Immune Systems</a>.</p><h2>Avoid contact with pets</h2><p>Do not allow your child to touch your pet. Pets carry bacteria, viruses and fungus that may harm your child. Keep your child away from surfaces where pets may have been such as the floor or furniture. If it is difficult to keep your child away from pets, you may choose to remove pets from your home during the treatment period. To prevent illness due to animal contact, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention recommends the following for all people, especially those at greatest risk of getting sick from pets:</p><ul><li>Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and running water after contact with animals and their feces.</li><li>Avoid rough play with cats and dogs to prevent scratches and bites.</li><li>If you are at higher risk of getting sick from animals, you should avoid contact with reptiles, baby chicks, ducklings, puppies?and kittens less than 6 months old, and pets with diarrhea. You should also be extra cautious around young calves and other farm animals.</li> </ul><h2>Do not smoke around your child</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=1963&language=English">Second-hand smoke</a> increases the frequency and severity of colds, coughs, ear infections, sinus infections, croup, wheezing, and asthma.</p><h2>Prepare and store food safely</h2><p>When preparing food for your child:</p><ul><li>always wash your hands before and after preparing food or handling raw meats</li><li>wash all fruits and vegetables before eating</li><li>keep all meat, poultry, and fish separate from cooked food and at the bottom of the refrigerator. Thaw frozen meat in the refrigerator (not on the counter) away from other foods. Use a plastic cutting board. Clean cutting boards and utensils immediately after use. Have a separate cutting board for meat only. Cook meat thoroughly. Avoid deli meats.</li><li>keep dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt in the fridge. All dairy products must be pasteurized.</li></ul><p>Your child should not eat food:</p><ul><li>left at room temperature for more than two hours, which should be refrigerated.</li><li>containing raw eggs.</li><li>that has expired.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Suppository_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpgImmunosuppression: Protecting your child from infection when the immune system is lowered

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