Guidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetesGGuidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetesGuidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetesEnglishEndocrinologyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-07-04T04:00:00ZNA7.0000000000000071.0000000000000292.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn the guidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetes.</p><p>Any illness may cause an upset in the blood sugar balance of a person with diabetes. This includes common illnesses such as a head cold, a sore throat or a case of the flu.</p><p>Blood sugar levels usually go up with an illness, and appetites tend to go down. If your child is not able to eat solid foods, make sure they have drinks that contain carbohydrate. This will help them to:</p><ul><li>Get enough liquids</li><li>Have enough energy to fight the infection</li><li>Keep blood sugar in a healthy and safe range</li></ul><p>Your child should still keep taking insulin even if they are sick and not eating.</p><br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>If your child has diabetes and is sick their blood sugar levels are likely to go up.</li> <li>If your child is unable to eat solid food while they are feeling unwell, at least make sure they drink fluids that contain carbohydrate.</li> <li>Your child should still take insulin even if they are not feeling well and not eating.</li> </ul>

 

 

Guidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetes1203.00000000000Guidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetesGuidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetesGEnglishEndocrinologyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-07-04T04:00:00ZNA7.0000000000000071.0000000000000292.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn the guidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetes.</p><p>Any illness may cause an upset in the blood sugar balance of a person with diabetes. This includes common illnesses such as a head cold, a sore throat or a case of the flu.</p><p>Blood sugar levels usually go up with an illness, and appetites tend to go down. If your child is not able to eat solid foods, make sure they have drinks that contain carbohydrate. This will help them to:</p><ul><li>Get enough liquids</li><li>Have enough energy to fight the infection</li><li>Keep blood sugar in a healthy and safe range</li></ul><p>Your child should still keep taking insulin even if they are sick and not eating.</p><br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>If your child has diabetes and is sick their blood sugar levels are likely to go up.</li> <li>If your child is unable to eat solid food while they are feeling unwell, at least make sure they drink fluids that contain carbohydrate.</li> <li>Your child should still take insulin even if they are not feeling well and not eating.</li> </ul><h2>Helpful tips</h2> If your child is counting carbohydrates <ul> <li>If possible, keep following the meal plan. Your child still needs carbohydrates to prevent a low blood sugar reaction.</li> <li>If your child has a hard time eating solid foods, you can give them drinks that contain carbohydrate. This will replace the amount of carbohydrate your child would normally have during that day.</li> <li>If needed, spread the carbohydrate evenly throughout the day.</li> </ul> <p>For example, if your child has 42 grams of carbohydrate for breakfast and 15 grams for morning snack, the total for the morning is 57 grams of carbohydrate.</p> <p>While your child is sick, they can have the 57 grams all at once or have 10 to 15 grams every hour.</p> <h3>If your child is not counting carbohydrates</h3> <p>They should have one of the sample choices below every hour.</p> <p>Sample choices of liquids that contain 10 grams of carbohydrate.</p> <ul> <li>Half a cup of juice </li> <li>1 cup of soup </li> <li>A third of a can of regular ginger ale</li> <li>Half a popsicle</li> <li>A quarter cup of regular Jell-O</li> </ul>Guidelines for planning meals on sick days for children with diabetes

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