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Bone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedureBBone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedureBone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedureEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-03-27T04:00:00ZJoao Amaral, MD;Candice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michael Temple, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000071.0000000000000527.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Bone ablation is a procedure in which heat is used to treat an osteoid osteoma, a benign bone growth. Learn about bone ablation and recovery. </p><p>Your child just had a <a href="/Article?contentid=2442&language=English">bone ablation</a>. This brochure explains how to care for your child at home after the procedure, and when to call for help.​</p><h2>Key points </h2> <ul> <li>Your child can have a bath or shower the day after the procedure. </li> <li>You can give your child acetaminophen or any other prescribed medicines for pain. </li> <li>Leave the dressing on until the skin has scabbed and healed. If the dressing gets wet, put on a clean Band-Aid instead. </li> <li>Your child should avoid major activity for six weeks.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <p>Phone your specialist or Image Guided Therapy (IGT), or go to the nearest Emergency Department right away if your child has any of the following: </p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> greater than 38°C (100.4°F) </li> <li>severe <a href="/pain">pain</a> </li> <li>throwing up (<a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>) that does not stop </li> <li>significant swelling around the ablation site </li> <li>bleeding around the ablation site </li> <li>redness or oozing around the ablation site</li> <li>change in the colour or temperature of the foot or hand on the side of the body where the ablation was done; for example, if the foot or hand turns a pale blue or is cool to touch</li> <li>change in sensation/strength of the limb ablated </li> </ul><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>If you have any concerns in the first 48 hours, call the IGT clinic during working hours at <strong>(416) 813-6054</strong> and ask to speak to an IGT nurse. If you have concerns and it is after working hours, see your family doctor or go to the nearest Emergency Department or call the Hospital for Sick Children switchboard at <strong>(416) 813-1500</strong> and ask them to page your specialist or the interventional radiologist on call.</p>
Tumeur osseuse : Soins de votre enfant à domicile après une ablationTTumeur osseuse : Soins de votre enfant à domicile après une ablationBone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedureFrenchOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-03-27T04:00:00ZJoao Amaral, MD;Candice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michael Temple, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000071.0000000000000527.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez-en plus sur l’ablation d’une tumeur osseuse et le rétablissement après la chirurgie.</p><p>Votre enfant vient de subir une ablation d’une tumeur osseuse. Lorsque votre enfant revient à la maison après l’intervention chirurgicale, veillez à suivre les instructions ci-après.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Votre enfant pourra prendre un bain ou une douche le lendemain de l’intervention.</li> <li>Vous pouvez donner de l’acétaminophène (Tylenol®) à votre enfant ou tout autre analgésique qui lui a été prescrit.</li> <li>Laissez le pansement en place pendant 24 heures. S’il est mouillé, remplacez-la par un pansement adhésif propre.</li> <li>Le médecin de votre enfant vous indiquera combien de temps il devra éviter de pratiquer certains sports.</li> <li>Discutez avec une infirmière du département de la thérapie assistée par imagerie médicale si vous avez des questions.</li> </ul><h2>Quand appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Téléphonez au spécialiste du département de la thérapie assistée par imagerie médicale ou rendez-vous au département d’urgence le plus proche immédiatement si votre enfant montre un des signes suivants : </p> <ul> <li>de la <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=French">fièvre</a> soit une température supérieure à 38°C (100,4°F), </li> <li>de la douleur intense,</li> <li>des vomissements continus,</li> <li>de l’enflure autour du site de l’ablation,</li> <li>des saignements autour du site de l’ablation,</li> <li>de la rougeur ou des suintements autour du site de l’ablation.</li> </ul><h2>Le lendemain de l’ablation</h2> <p>Le lendemain de l’ablation d’une tumeur osseuse, avant 10 h 00, téléphonez au département de thérapie guidée par l'image (TGI) à la clinique au 416-813-7654, poste 1804, pour indiquer comment se sent votre enfant. Si l’infirmière n’est pas disponible, veuillez laisser un message et un numéro où elle pourra vous rappeler.</p>

 

 

Bone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedure1213.00000000000Bone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedureBone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedureBEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-03-27T04:00:00ZJoao Amaral, MD;Candice Sockett, RN(EC), MN:APN;Michael Temple, MD, FRCPC7.0000000000000071.0000000000000527.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Bone ablation is a procedure in which heat is used to treat an osteoid osteoma, a benign bone growth. Learn about bone ablation and recovery. </p><p>Your child just had a <a href="/Article?contentid=2442&language=English">bone ablation</a>. This brochure explains how to care for your child at home after the procedure, and when to call for help.​</p><h2>Key points </h2> <ul> <li>Your child can have a bath or shower the day after the procedure. </li> <li>You can give your child acetaminophen or any other prescribed medicines for pain. </li> <li>Leave the dressing on until the skin has scabbed and healed. If the dressing gets wet, put on a clean Band-Aid instead. </li> <li>Your child should avoid major activity for six weeks.</li> </ul><h2>Dressing care </h2><p>Your child will have a dressing or bandage over the site of the ablation. Take the dressing off after 24 hours if the site has scabbed underneath. </p><p>If the dressing gets wet or dirty, please take it off and replace it with a clean Band-Aid. Your child may also have a bruise at the ablation site, which can take up to 10 days to go away. </p><h2>Bathing </h2><p>Your child may shower or take a bath the day after the procedure. Please try to keep the treatment site dry until it has scabbed and healed. </p><h2>Meals </h2><p>If your child is feeling well enough after the anaesthetic, they can return to eating what they normally eat. It is also important to encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids for 48 hours after the procedure. </p><h2>Pain relief </h2><p>If needed, give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> for pain. Do not give your child any medicines that will thin the blood, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">ASA (acetylsalicylic acid)</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, without checking with a nurse or your child's doctor first. </p><h2>Activity </h2><p>Your child can resume gentle activities one day after the ablation. This can include walking to school. If it hurts too much to do this on the first day, have a rest day and try again the following day. </p><p>Your child may need to use crutches if your doctor thinks it is necessary. You can ask your doctor after the procedure if they are needed and for how long. </p><p>Your child should avoid playing contact sports and high-impact activities for about six weeks. These include: </p><ul><li>contact sports </li><li>gymnastics </li><li>diving/swimming </li><li>bicycle riding </li><li>rollerblading </li><li>hockey </li><li>soccer </li><li>skiing </li><li>horseback riding </li></ul><h2>Radiation </h2><ul><li>Your child's procedure required the use of X-rays. </li><li>Radiation side-effects are extremely unlikely, but can occur. </li><li>Please check your child's skin in the area of the procedure for signs of redness or rash two to four weeks from today. Please call (416) 813-6054 and ask to speak to an IGT clinic nurse if this occurs. </li></ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2> <p>Phone your specialist or Image Guided Therapy (IGT), or go to the nearest Emergency Department right away if your child has any of the following: </p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> greater than 38°C (100.4°F) </li> <li>severe <a href="/pain">pain</a> </li> <li>throwing up (<a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>) that does not stop </li> <li>significant swelling around the ablation site </li> <li>bleeding around the ablation site </li> <li>redness or oozing around the ablation site</li> <li>change in the colour or temperature of the foot or hand on the side of the body where the ablation was done; for example, if the foot or hand turns a pale blue or is cool to touch</li> <li>change in sensation/strength of the limb ablated </li> </ul><h2>At SickKids</h2> <p>If you have any concerns in the first 48 hours, call the IGT clinic during working hours at <strong>(416) 813-6054</strong> and ask to speak to an IGT nurse. If you have concerns and it is after working hours, see your family doctor or go to the nearest Emergency Department or call the Hospital for Sick Children switchboard at <strong>(416) 813-1500</strong> and ask them to page your specialist or the interventional radiologist on call.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/bone_ablation_caring_for_your_child_at_home.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/bone_ablation_caring_for_your_child_at_home.jpgBone Ablation: Caring for your child at home after the procedure

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