Tonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationTTonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationTonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationEnglishOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP6.0000000000000077.00000000000001700.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Tonsils and adenoids may be removed if they become enlarged. Read about surgery to remove tonsils and adenoids and how to help your child recover.</p><p>Your child needs an operation to take out their tonsils. Your child may also need an operation to take out their adenoids at the same time. These operations are called a tonsillectomy and an adenoidectomy.</p><h2>What are tonsils?</h2><p>The tonsils are small pieces of tissue at the back of the mouth, beside the tongue. They help fight germs. There is one tonsil on either side of the throat. </p><h2>What are adenoids?</h2><p>Adenoids are lumps of tissue up behind the nose. You cannot see your child's adenoids when looking in the mouth.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Tonsils and </span><span class="asset-image-title">adenoids</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tonsils_adenoid_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Tonsils</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> and adenoids are made of lymphatic tissue and are part of the body's defense system against infection. They may become enlarged after repeated infections.</figcaption></figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Your child will have an operation to take out their enlarged tonsils and possibly their adenoids. </li> <li>Your child will be asleep and feel no pain when their tonsils and adenoids are removed. </li> <li>Most children can go home on the same day as the operation. </li> <li>It will take about a week to 10 days before your child can go back to their regular activities and diet.</li> </ul><h2>Reasons to call the doctor</h2> <p>Please call your child's otolaryngologist, the otolaryngology clinic nurse or your family doctor if your child has any of the following signs after going home: </p> <ul> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li>refusing to drink </li> <li>child does not urinate (pee) within 12 hours of the operation </li> <li>fresh blood in the nose or mouth. </li> </ul> <p>If your child is bleeding or having trouble breathing, or if you are worried, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department right away. </p> <h3>Write down contact information here:</h3> <p>Otolaryngologist's name and number:</p> <p>Otolaryngology clinic nurse's number:</p> <p>Family doctor's name and number:</p><h2>Removing enlarged tonsils and adenoids</h2> <p>After many infections, the tonsils and adenoids often become enlarged. This can interfere with breathing. Enlarged adenoids can also affect the tubes that connect the middle ears and the back of the nose. When tonsils or adenoids become too large, they may need to be taken out.</p> <p>Removing the tonsils and adenoids improves breathing. It may also help your child have fewer ear and throat infections.</p> <p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon will do the operation. An otolaryngologist is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ears, nose and throat.</p><h2>Surgery to remove the tonsils and adenoids</h2> <p>The doctor will give your child a special sleep medicine called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This will make sure your child sleeps through the operation and does not feel any pain. </p> <p>While your child is asleep, the doctor will remove the tonsils through your child's mouth. If your child is also having an adenoidectomy, the doctor will take out your child's adenoids at the same time. The doctor will then stop the bleeding. Your child will not get stitches. </p> <p>The operation usually takes from 45 to 60 minutes.</p> <h2>You will be able to see your child as soon as they are fully awake</h2> <p>A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child.</p><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>After the operation, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post Anaesthetic Care Unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">PACU</a> for about one hour. We will then move your child to a room on the nursing unit.</p> <h2>Your child will be closely monitored on the nursing unit</h2> <ul> <li>Your child will be encouraged to take fluids by mouth. Your child will start with sips of clear fluids (liquids you can see through, such as water or apple juice), ice chips or freezies. Once your child can take sips, they can then drink liquids from a cup.</li> <li>Your child's temperature will be taken often.</li> <li>Your child will still have an intravenous (IV) tube in their arm. When it is no longer needed for fluids or medicine, it will be taken out.</li> <li>Your child will be given pain medicine when needed.</li> <li>The nursing staff will watch your child for vomiting (throwing up) or bleeding.</li> <li>The nurses will tell the doctor if there are any complications.</li> <li>When your child is fully awake, they can get up with help to use the washroom. </li> <li>Your child may throw up thick, brownish-coloured liquid if they swallowed some blood during or after the operation. This is normal. If your child keeps throwing up, they will receive medicine through the IV to help settle their upset stomach. </li> </ul> <h2>Managing your child's pain after the operation</h2> <p>When your child has pain after the operation, they will be given pain medicine either:</p> <ul> <li>by liquid, to swallow</li> <li>if they cannot swallow, by a suppository that goes into your child's rectum.</li> </ul> <p>These are ways you can help make your child more comfortable:</p> <ul> <li>humidified air to keep the throat moist</li> <li>raising your child's head and shoulders to help reduce swelling. </li> </ul> <h2>Usually just one day in the hospital</h2> <p>Most children are ready to go home from the hospital about six to eight hours after the operation. Sometimes, children need to stay for a longer time. </p> <p>You should take your child home in a car or a taxi. For your child's comfort and safety, do not take your child home by bus or subway. </p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the surgery, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you exactly when this must happen.</p> <p>Write this information down here:</p> <ul> <li>The date and time of the operation: </li> <li>When your child must stop eating: </li> <li>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids: </li> <li>Other things to remember: </li> </ul>
جراحة اللوزات او جراحة اللوزة والغدانيّة: العناية بطفلك بعد العمليةججراحة اللوزات او جراحة اللوزة والغدانيّة: العناية بطفلك بعد العمليةTonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationArabicOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP6.0000000000000075.00000000000001500.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>اقرأ عن استئصال اللوزتين والغدانيّات واحصل على المزيد من المعلومات عن عملية اللوز هذه. احصل على نصائح لمساعدة طفلك بعد عملية اللوز والغدانيّات.</p>
扁桃体手术或扁桃体和腺样体手术:手术后护理你的孩子扁桃体手术或扁桃体和腺样体手术:手术后护理你的孩子Tonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationChineseSimplifiedNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RNTomka George, RNPauline Lackey, RNPaolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FP75.00000000000006.000000000000001500.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z如果扁桃体和腺样体变得肥大,可能需要摘除。阅读有关摘除扁桃体和腺样体的手术以及如何帮助你的孩子恢复。<br>
扁桃體手術或扁桃體和腺樣體手術 術後兒童護理扁桃體手術或扁桃體和腺樣體手術 術後兒童護理Tonsil Surgery or Tonsil and Adenoid Surgery: Caring For Your Child After the OperationChineseTraditionalNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RNTomka George, RNPauline Lackey, RNPaolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FP75.00000000000006.000000000000001500.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z當扁桃體和腺樣體變大時可以進行切除。瞭解切除扁桃體及腺樣體的手術以及如何幫助孩子恢復。
Cirugía de amígdalas o cirugía de amígdalas y adenoides: cuidado del niño después de la operaciónCCirugía de amígdalas o cirugía de amígdalas y adenoides: cuidado del niño después de la operaciónTonsil Surgery or Tonsil and Adenoid Surgery: Caring For Your Child After the OperationSpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2008-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN Tomka George, RN Pauline Lackey, RN Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Las amígdalas y las adenoides pueden extirparse si se agrandan. Lea sobre la operación de amígdalas y adenoides y el cuidado postoperatorio que necesitará.</p>
உள் நாக்குச் சதை (டொன்சில்) அறுவைச் சிகிச்சை அல்லது உள் நாக்குச் சதை மற்றும் அடினோயிட் அறுவைச் சிகிச்சை; அறுவைச் சிகிச்சையின் பின்னர் உங்கள் பிள்ளையைப் பராமரித்தல்உள் நாக்குச் சதை (டொன்சில்) அறுவைச் சிகிச்சை அல்லது உள் நாக்குச் சதை மற்றும் அடினோயிட் அறுவைச் சிகிச்சை; அறுவைச் சிகிச்சையின் பின்னர் உங்கள் பிள்ளையைப் பராமரித்தல்Tonsil Surgery or Tonsil and Adenoid Surgery: Caring For Your Child After the OperationTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RNTomka George, RNPauline Lackey, RNPaolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>உள் நாக்குச் சதைகள் மற்றும் அடினோயிட்டுகள் ஆகியவை பெரிதானால் அகற்றப்படலாம். பிள்ளைகள் உள் நாக்குச் சதை அகற்றுதல் அல்லது அடினோயிட் அகற்றுதல் என்பதைப் பற்றியும</p>
ٹانسل) گلے کے غدود ( کی جرّاحی یا ٹانسل اور ایڈینوائڈ ) ناک اور گلے کے درمیان زائد غدود ( کی جرّاحی کا عمل : آپریشن کے بعد بچے کی نگہداشت کرناٹٹانسل) گلے کے غدود ( کی جرّاحی یا ٹانسل اور ایڈینوائڈ ) ناک اور گلے کے درمیان زائد غدود ( کی جرّاحی کا عمل : آپریشن کے بعد بچے کی نگہداشت کرناTonsil Surgery or Tonsil and Adenoid Surgery: Caring For Your Child After the OperationUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RNTomka George, RNPauline Lackey, RNPaolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP75.00000000000006.000000000000001500.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Zاگر لوزہ یا غدہ زیادہ بڑے ہوجاتے ہیں تو انہیں نکالا جاسکتا ہے۔ بچوں کی لوزہ یا غدہ براری اور اس بارے میں پڑھیں کہ اپنے بچے کی صحتیابی میں کس طرح مدد کریں۔
Opération des amygdales et/ou des végétations adénoïdes : soin de votre enfant après l'opérationOOpération des amygdales et/ou des végétations adénoïdes : soin de votre enfant après l'opérationTonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationFrenchOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP6.0000000000000077.00000000000001700.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les amygdales et les adénoïdes pourraient devoir être extraites si elles deviennent gonflées.</p><p>Votre enfant doit se faire opérer pour se faire retirer les amygdales. Votre enfant pourrait aussi devoir se faire retirer les végétations adénoïdes au même moment. On appelle ces opérations amygdalectomie et adénoïdectomie.</p> <h2>Que sont les amygdales?</h2> <p>Les amygdales sont de petits morceaux de tissus situés à l'arrière de la bouche, à côté de la langue. Ils aident à combattre les germes (microbes). Il y a une amygdale de chaque côté de la gorge.</p> <h2>Que sont les végétations adénoïdes?</h2> <p>Les végétations adénoïdes (ou végétations) sont des bosses de tissu situées derrière le nez. On ne peut pas les voir quand on regarde dans la bouche.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Amygdales et végétations adénoïdes</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tonsils_adenoid_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Les amygdales et les végétations adénoïdes sont composées de tissu lymphatique et font partie du système de défense du corps contre l’infection. Ils peuvent grossir après des infections répétées.</figcaption> </figure><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Votre enfant se fera opérer pour se faire retirer les amygdales enflées et peut-être aussi les végétations.</li> <li>Votre enfant sera endormi et ne ressentira aucune douleur quand les amygdales et les végétations seront extraites.</li> <li>La plupart des enfants peuvent retourner à la maison le jour-même.</li> <li>Il faudra attendre environ sept à dix jours avant que votre enfant ne puisse reprendre ses activités et son alimentation normales.</li> </ul><h2>Raisons d'appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Appelez l'ORL, la clinique ou votre médecin de famille si votre enfant montre l'un ou l'autre des signes suivants</p> <ul> <li>fièvre de 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus;</li> <li>vomissements qui n'arrêtent pas;</li> <li>douleur qui empire;</li> <li>refus de boire;</li> <li>l'enfant n'urine pas dans les 12 heures qui suivent l'opération;</li> <li>sang frais dans le nez ou la bouche.</li> </ul> <p>S'il y a des saignements ou si votre enfant a de la difficulté à respirer, ou si vous êtes inquiet, n'attendez pas et rendez-vous au service d'urgence le plus près immédiatement.</p> <h3>Écrire les numéros importants ici :</h3> <p>Écrivez le nom et le numéro de l'ORL ici :</p> <p>Numéro de l'infirmier de la clinique :</p> <p>Écrivez le nom et le numéro de votre médecin de famille ici :</p><h2>Extraction des amygdales et des végetations adénoïdes enflées</h2> <p>Après de nombreuses infections, les amygdales et les végétations souvent enflent, ce qui peut interférer avec la respiration. Les végétations enflées peuvent aussi exercer une pression sur les tubes qui lient l'oreille moyenne et l'arrière du nez. Quand les amygdales ou les végétations deviennent trop grosses, on doit les retirer.</p> <p>Enlever les amygdales et les végétations améliore la respiration et peut aussi aider votre enfant à avoir moins d'infections des oreilles et de la gorge.</p> <p>Un otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL) et chirurgien de la tête et du cou fera l'opération. Un ORL est un médecin spécialisé dans les problèmes d'oreille, du nez et de la gorge.</p><h2>Extraction des amygdales et des végétations enflées</h2> <p>Avant le début de l'opération, on donnera un médicament à votre enfant pour l'endormir, appelé anesthésie générale. Cela fera dormir votre enfant tout au long de l'opération et il ne ressentira aucune douleur. </p> <p>Quand votre enfant dormira, le médecin extraira les amygdales par la bouche. S'il doit aussi retirer les végétations, il le fera au même moment. Le médecin arrêtera ensuite le saignement. Votre enfant n'aura pas de points de suture.</p> <p>L'opération prend habituellement 5 à 60 minutes.</p> <h2>Vous verrez votre enfant dès qu'il se réveillera</h2> <p>Après l'intervention, un bénévole vous accompagnera vers l'unité de soins postopératoires.</p><h2>Après l'opération</h2> <p>Après l'opération, nous vous accompagnerons vers la salle de réveil, aussi appelée l'unité de soins postopératoires. C'est là que votre enfant se réveillera. Votre enfant y passera une heure. Il sera ensuite transféré dans une chambre dans l'unité de soins.</p> <h2>Votre enfant sera surveillé avec attention à l'unité de soins</h2> <ul> <li>On encouragera votre enfant à boire des liquides. Il pourra commencer par de petites gorgées de liquide clair (des liquides qui sont transparents, comme l'eau ou le jus de pomme) ou sucer de la glace oilée ou des bâtonnets glacés. Une fois que votre enfant pourra boire de petites gorgées, il pourra boire des liquides au verre.</li> <li>On prendra la température de votre enfant souvent.</li> <li>Votre enfant aura un tube intraveineux (IV) dans le bras. Quand le tube ne sera plus nécessaire pour administrer des liquides ou des médicaments, on le retirera.</li> <li>Votre enfant recevra des médicaments contre la douleur au besoin.</li> <li>Le personnel infirmier surveillera votre enfant en cas de vomissements ou de saignements.</li> <li>Les infirmiers diront au médecin s'il y a eu des complications.</li> <li>Quand votre enfant sera entièrement réveillé, il pourra se lever avec de l'aide pour aller à la salle de bains.</li> <li>Il est possible que votre enfant régurgite un liquide brunâtre épais s'il a avalé du sang pendant ou après l'opération. C'est normal. Si votre enfant continue de vomir, nous lui donnerons des médicaments au moyen de l'IV pour soulager son estomac.</li> </ul> <h2>Gestion de la douleur de votre enfant après l'opération</h2> <p>Quand votre enfant aura mal après l'opération, on lui donnera des médicaments :</p> <ul> <li>à avaler sous forme liquide;</li> <li>s'il ne peut pas avaler, nous pouvons lui donner un suppositoire.</li> </ul> <p>Voici des moyens de soulager votre enfant:</p> <ul> <li>Air humidifié pour ne pas que sa gorge s'assèche</li> <li>Élever la tête et les épaules pour réduire l'enflure</li> </ul> <h2>Le séjour dure habituellement une journée</h2> <p>La plupart des enfants sont prêts à retourner à la maison après six à huit heures. Parfois, les enfants doivent rester plus longtemps.</p> <p>Vous devriez ramener votre enfant à la maison en voiture ou en taxi. Pour son confort et sa sécurité, ne ramenez pas votre enfant en autobus ou en métro.</p><h2>Avant l'opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l'opération, votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. L'infirmière ou le médecin vous dira quand votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire.</p> <p>Écrivez ces renseignements ici :</p> <ul> <li>Date et heure de l'opération :</li> <li>Heure où l'enfant doit cesser de manger :</li> <li>Heure où l'enfant doit cesser de boire des liquides clairs :</li> <li>Autres choses à retenir :</li> </ul>

 

 

Tonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operation1220.00000000000Tonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationTonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operationTEnglishOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP6.0000000000000077.00000000000001700.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Tonsils and adenoids may be removed if they become enlarged. Read about surgery to remove tonsils and adenoids and how to help your child recover.</p><p>Your child needs an operation to take out their tonsils. Your child may also need an operation to take out their adenoids at the same time. These operations are called a tonsillectomy and an adenoidectomy.</p><h2>What are tonsils?</h2><p>The tonsils are small pieces of tissue at the back of the mouth, beside the tongue. They help fight germs. There is one tonsil on either side of the throat. </p><h2>What are adenoids?</h2><p>Adenoids are lumps of tissue up behind the nose. You cannot see your child's adenoids when looking in the mouth.</p> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Tonsils and </span><span class="asset-image-title">adenoids</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tonsils_adenoid_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Tonsils</figcaption><figcaption class="asset-image-caption"> and adenoids are made of lymphatic tissue and are part of the body's defense system against infection. They may become enlarged after repeated infections.</figcaption></figure><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Your child will have an operation to take out their enlarged tonsils and possibly their adenoids. </li> <li>Your child will be asleep and feel no pain when their tonsils and adenoids are removed. </li> <li>Most children can go home on the same day as the operation. </li> <li>It will take about a week to 10 days before your child can go back to their regular activities and diet.</li> </ul><h2>Caring for your child at home</h2> <h3>Pain</h3> <p>Your child will have some pain after the operation.</p> <p>Your child will have a sore throat. They may also have an earache, which is caused by the sore throat. Five or six days after the operation, your child's sore throat or earache may get worse for a short time. This is normal. </p> <p>Your child may also have a stiff neck. If this becomes bad, call your doctor.</p> <p>Follow these instructions when your child goes home after the procedure.</p> <p>You may give your child medicine for pain.</p> <p>You may receive a prescription for pain medication before you leave the hospital. Follow the dosage instructions give to you by the pharmacist. Although these prescription pain medications can be beneficial, they are also potentially very dangerous if not used properly.</p> <p>When using these medications, if you notice any changes in either breathing or level of drowsiness that concern you, stop the medication and seek medical attention. If your child is unresponsive, call 911 immediately.</p> <p>Do not give your child over-the-counter medicine that may have a sedative effect (makes people sleepy) while giving the prescription for pain medicine. Examples of these medicines are decongestants and antihistamines. Discuss these medications with your pharmacist.</p> <p>You may give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> if they have pain. Give the dose printed on the bottle for your child's age. Do not give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a> for two weeks after the surgery. These medications could increase your child's risk of bleeding after the operation. Check with the nurse or doctor first before giving these medicines to your child.</p> <h3>Drinking</h3> <p>It is very important that your child have lots to drink after the operation. Try to get your child to drink at least four glasses of liquid a day over the first few days after the operation. Let your child drink as much liquid or liquidy foods, such as Jell-O and yogurt, as they want.</p> <p>Do not let your child have orange, lemon or grapefruit juices or other citrus fruits for seven to 10 days. These contain acid, and your child may find them painful to drink. </p> <h3>Eating</h3> <p>When your child can drink liquids without throwing up, they may eat soft foods such as noodles, eggs and yogurt. When your child can eat soft foods comfortably, they may eat regular foods. </p> <p>Your child should not eat hard foods, such as toast or pizza crust, for two weeks after the operation. These foods may scratch their throat and cause pain and bleeding. </p> <h3>Mouth care</h3> <p>Your child's mouth may smell different for two weeks after the operation. Have your child rinse their mouth with water or gently brush their teeth. Do not let your child gargle or swish anything around in the back of their throat.</p> <p>Your child may have white patches where the tonsils were for several days. This does not mean that your child has an infection. To protect your child's throat, make sure your child tries not to cough, talk loudly or clear their throat a lot for seven to 10 days. Teach your child to sneeze with their mouth open. Do not let your child blow their nose for at least one week after the operation. They should dab their nose with a tissue if it is dripping.</p> <p>To help your child breathe more comfortably, you can use a machine called a humidifier. This machine makes the air moist with a cool mist. Put it at your child's bedside. </p> <p>To reduce swelling and make your child more comfortable, try raising your child's head and shoulders.</p> <p>If your child also had their adenoids taken out, their voice may sound as if they are talking through their nose. This is normal. This may last for a few weeks or up to three months, if the adenoids were very large. </p> <h3>Activity</h3> <p>Your child should be as quiet as possible for about a week after the operation. Do not let your child play rough sports or contact sports. </p> <p>Your child can shower or bathe as usual. Your child should stay away from crowds and people with infections and colds.</p> <p>Your child can go back to school or day care in a week to 10 days after the operation. You should not let your child go on long trips out of town for two weeks after the operation. </p><h2>Reasons to call the doctor</h2> <p>Please call your child's otolaryngologist, the otolaryngology clinic nurse or your family doctor if your child has any of the following signs after going home: </p> <ul> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li>refusing to drink </li> <li>child does not urinate (pee) within 12 hours of the operation </li> <li>fresh blood in the nose or mouth. </li> </ul> <p>If your child is bleeding or having trouble breathing, or if you are worried, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department right away. </p> <h3>Write down contact information here:</h3> <p>Otolaryngologist's name and number:</p> <p>Otolaryngology clinic nurse's number:</p> <p>Family doctor's name and number:</p><h2>Your child may need a follow-up appointment</h2> <p>The otolaryngology clinic nurse will call you within two weeks of the operation to find out if your child has any problems and needs to see the doctor again. If your otolaryngologist has asked to see your child again in the clinic, we will make you an appointment for your child. </p><h2>Removing enlarged tonsils and adenoids</h2> <p>After many infections, the tonsils and adenoids often become enlarged. This can interfere with breathing. Enlarged adenoids can also affect the tubes that connect the middle ears and the back of the nose. When tonsils or adenoids become too large, they may need to be taken out.</p> <p>Removing the tonsils and adenoids improves breathing. It may also help your child have fewer ear and throat infections.</p> <p>An otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon will do the operation. An otolaryngologist is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ears, nose and throat.</p><h2>Surgery to remove the tonsils and adenoids</h2> <p>The doctor will give your child a special sleep medicine called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This will make sure your child sleeps through the operation and does not feel any pain. </p> <p>While your child is asleep, the doctor will remove the tonsils through your child's mouth. If your child is also having an adenoidectomy, the doctor will take out your child's adenoids at the same time. The doctor will then stop the bleeding. Your child will not get stitches. </p> <p>The operation usually takes from 45 to 60 minutes.</p> <h2>You will be able to see your child as soon as they are fully awake</h2> <p>A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child.</p><h2>After the operation</h2> <p>After the operation, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post Anaesthetic Care Unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">PACU</a> for about one hour. We will then move your child to a room on the nursing unit.</p> <h2>Your child will be closely monitored on the nursing unit</h2> <ul> <li>Your child will be encouraged to take fluids by mouth. Your child will start with sips of clear fluids (liquids you can see through, such as water or apple juice), ice chips or freezies. Once your child can take sips, they can then drink liquids from a cup.</li> <li>Your child's temperature will be taken often.</li> <li>Your child will still have an intravenous (IV) tube in their arm. When it is no longer needed for fluids or medicine, it will be taken out.</li> <li>Your child will be given pain medicine when needed.</li> <li>The nursing staff will watch your child for vomiting (throwing up) or bleeding.</li> <li>The nurses will tell the doctor if there are any complications.</li> <li>When your child is fully awake, they can get up with help to use the washroom. </li> <li>Your child may throw up thick, brownish-coloured liquid if they swallowed some blood during or after the operation. This is normal. If your child keeps throwing up, they will receive medicine through the IV to help settle their upset stomach. </li> </ul> <h2>Managing your child's pain after the operation</h2> <p>When your child has pain after the operation, they will be given pain medicine either:</p> <ul> <li>by liquid, to swallow</li> <li>if they cannot swallow, by a suppository that goes into your child's rectum.</li> </ul> <p>These are ways you can help make your child more comfortable:</p> <ul> <li>humidified air to keep the throat moist</li> <li>raising your child's head and shoulders to help reduce swelling. </li> </ul> <h2>Usually just one day in the hospital</h2> <p>Most children are ready to go home from the hospital about six to eight hours after the operation. Sometimes, children need to stay for a longer time. </p> <p>You should take your child home in a car or a taxi. For your child's comfort and safety, do not take your child home by bus or subway. </p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the surgery, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you exactly when this must happen.</p> <p>Write this information down here:</p> <ul> <li>The date and time of the operation: </li> <li>When your child must stop eating: </li> <li>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids: </li> <li>Other things to remember: </li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Tonsils_adenoid_MED_ILL_EN.jpgTonsil surgery or tonsil and adenoid surgery: Caring for your child after the operation

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