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Scoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgerySScoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgeryScoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgeryEnglishOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;EsophagusEsophagus;TracheaTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BSc;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001036.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Scoping procedures are used to look inside the throat. Learn why your child may have to have a scoping procedure, how to prepare and what to expect.</p><h2>What are scoping procedures?</h2> <p>Your child is having trouble breathing or swallowing. To find out what is causing this problem, the doctor needs to look inside your child's air or food passageway. To do this, the doctor will use a thin tube with a light and a tiny camera on the end. This device is called a scope. </p> <p>During the scoping procedure, your child will be given a special sleep medicine called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthetic</a>. This means your child will sleep through the procedure and feel no pain. </p> <p>If the problem is caused by tissue that is not normal, the doctor may remove it using laser surgery.</p> <p>The doctor who will do the scoping procedure is called an otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon (say: OH-toe-lar-ing-GOL-oh-jist). This is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ears, nose and throat. </p> <h3>To look inside your child's air passageway, we use bronchoscopy and laryngoscopy</h3> <p>Your child's air passageway is called the trachea (say: TRAY-key-ah). To look inside, the doctor will use scoping procedures called a bronchoscopy (say: bron-KOSS-co-pee) and a laryngoscopy (say: lar-ing-GOSS-co-pee). During each of these procedures, the doctor will put a scope in your child's mouth and down into the trachea. The doctor can look through the scope to see what is causing your child's breathing problem. The procedure takes about one hour. </p> <h3>To look inside your child's food passageway, we use esophagoscopy</h3> <p>Your child's food passageway is called the esophagus (say: ee-SOFF-ah-gus). To look inside it, the doctor will use a scoping procedure called an esophagoscopy (say: ee-SOFF-ah-GOSS-co-pee). During this procedure, the doctor will put a scope in your child's mouth and down into the esophagus. The doctor can look through the scope to see what is causing your child's swallowing problem. The procedure takes about one hour. </p> <h2>Laser surgery</h2> <p>Laser surgery uses a concentrated beam of light instead of a scalpel or knife to remove unwanted tissue or blockages. Laser surgery can be performed during a bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy and esophagoscopy.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Scoping procedures let doctors look into your child's throat. They take about one hour. </li> <li>Your child will have sleep medicine during the procedure. </li> <li>Your child will likely stay for one day and one night in the hospital. </li> </ul><h2>Possible problems after the procedure</h2> <p>Please call your child's otolaryngologist or the otolaryngology clinic right away if your child has any of the following signs after going home: </p> <ul> <li>trouble swallowing </li> <li>trouble breathing </li> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>chest pain or throat pain that gets worse </li> <li>coughing that gets worse </li> <li>drooling that does not stop </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>bleeding from mouth or nose </li> </ul> <p>If it is an emergency or if you are worried, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department right away.</p> <p>Write down the name of your child's otolaryngologist here:</p> <p>Write down the doctor's phone number here:</p> <p>Write down the otolaryngology clinic phone number here:</p> <p>Write down your family doctor's name and number here:</p><h2>Your child will not feel any pain during the procedure</h2> <p>Before the procedure starts, your child will be given a special sleep medicine called <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthetic</a>. This makes sure your child will sleep through the procedure and will not feel pain. After the procedure, your child's throat may be sore and feel dry. If your child feels pain after the procedure, they will be given pain medicine as needed. </p><h2>After the procedure</h2> <p>After the procedure, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post-Anesthetic Care Unit</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the recovery room for one to two hours, depending on their age and symptoms. </p> <p>After your child has stayed in the recovery room, we will move them to a special room on the otolaryngology unit. This room has a nurse in it at all times. It is called the constant observation room. Your child will probably stay in this room overnight. </p> <h3>You will be able to see your child as soon as they are fully awake</h3> <p>A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child.</p> <p>Your child may have a mild cough or hoarse voice when they wake up. This usually will go away on its own.</p> <h2>Eating and drinking after the procedure</h2> <p>Your child will not be allowed to eat or drink for two to four hours after the procedure. Check with your child's nurse to see when your child can start eating and drinking. Your child will then start drinking clear liquids such as water or apple juice. Then your child may have soft foods such as Jell-O. After your child is able to drink, your child can start eating their usual food again. </p> <h2>One day and one night in the hospital</h2> <p>Your child will be in the hospital for the entire day of the procedure and probably overnight. This will depend on how quickly your child recovers after the procedure. One parent may stay with your child overnight in the constant observation room. </p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The nurse or doctor will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. Write this information here: </p> <p>The date and time of the operation: _____________________</p> <p>Time when your child must stop eating: __________________</p> <p>Time when your child must stop drinking clear fluids: ________________</p> <p>Other things to remember: _________________</p>
اجراءات الفحص: تنظير القصبات، تنظير الحنجرة، تنظير المريء، وجراحة الليزرااجراءات الفحص: تنظير القصبات، تنظير الحنجرة، تنظير المريء، وجراحة الليزرScoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy, and laser surgeryArabicOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;EsophagusEsophagus;TracheaTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BSc;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001036.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>تستخدم إجراءات الفحص للنظر داخل الحلق. تعلّم لماذا قد يخضع طفلك لإجراءات الفحص، وكيفية إعداده وماذا تتوقع.</p>
镜检查程序:支气管镜、喉镜、食管镜和激光手术镜检查程序:支气管镜、喉镜、食管镜和激光手术Scoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgeryChineseSimplifiedNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BScPauline Lackey, RNTomka George, RNVito Forte, MD, FRCSC69.00000000000007.000000000000001036.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z镜检查程序用来查看喉咙内部。了解你的孩子为什么可能做一个镜检查程序,如何准备和期待什么。<br><br>
檢查鏡檢查程序:支氣管鏡檢查、喉鏡檢查、食管鏡測法和激光手術檢查鏡檢查程序:支氣管鏡檢查、喉鏡檢查、食管鏡測法和激光手術Scoping Procedures: Bronchoscopy, Laryngoscopy, Esophagoscopy, and Laser SurgeryChineseTraditionalNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BScPauline Lackey, RNTomka George, RNVito Forte, MD, FRCSC69.00000000000007.000000000000001036.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z檢查鏡檢查程序被用來檢查咽喉內部。介紹了孩子要介紹檢查鏡檢查的原因、怎樣準備以及過程詳情。
Procedimientos endoscópicos: broncoscopia, laringoscopia, esofagoscopia y cirugía láserPProcedimientos endoscópicos: broncoscopia, laringoscopia, esofagoscopia y cirugía láserScoping Procedures: Bronchoscopy, Laryngoscopy, Esophagoscopy, and Laser SurgerySpanishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BSc Pauline Lackey, RN Tomka George, RN Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Sepa por qué es necesario que a su niño le realicen un procedimiento endoscópico, cómo prepararlo y qué esperar.</p>
ஸ்கோப்பிங் செயற்பாடுகள்: நுரையீரல் ஊடு சோதிப்பு, குரல் வளை ஊடு சோதிப்பு, உணவுக் குழாய் ஊடு சோதிப்பு மற்றும் லேசர் அறுவைச் சிகிச்சைஸ்கோப்பிங் செயற்பாடுகள்: நுரையீரல் ஊடு சோதிப்பு, குரல் வளை ஊடு சோதிப்பு, உணவுக் குழாய் ஊடு சோதிப்பு மற்றும் லேசர் அறுவைச் சிகிச்சைScoping Procedures: Bronchoscopy, Laryngoscopy, Esophagoscopy, and Laser SurgeryTamilNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BScPauline Lackey, RNTomka George, RNVito Forte, MD, FRCSC000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>உங்கள் பிள்ளைக்கு ஏன் ஊடு சோதிப்பு செய்யப்படவேண்டும், எப்படித் தயாராகலாம் மற்றும் எதை எதிர்பார்க்கவேண்டும் என்பதைப்பற்றிக் கற்றுக் கொள்ளவும். </p>
سکوپنگ کے طریقے: برونکوسکوپی، لیرینگوسکوپی، ایسوفَیگوسکوپی اور لیزر سرجریسسکوپنگ کے طریقے: برونکوسکوپی، لیرینگوسکوپی، ایسوفَیگوسکوپی اور لیزر سرجریScoping Procedures: Bronchoscopy, Laryngoscopy, Esophagoscopy, and Laser SurgeryUrduNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BScPauline Lackey, RNTomka George, RNVito Forte, MD, FRCSC69.00000000000007.000000000000001036.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Zسکوپنگ کے طریقے بچے کے حلق کے اندر دیکھنے کے لئے استعمال کیے جاتے ہیں۔ اس بارے میں جانئے کہ سکوپنگ کی کیوں ضرورت پڑتی ہے اور اسکے لئے کس طرح تیار ہوا جائے اور کیسی توقع رکھی جائے۔
Examens par imagerie : bronchoscopie, laryngoscopie, oesophagoscopie et chirurgie au laserEExamens par imagerie : bronchoscopie, laryngoscopie, oesophagoscopie et chirurgie au laserScoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgeryFrenchOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;EsophagusEsophagus;TracheaTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BSc;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001036.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les examens par imagerie servent à regarder dans la gorge. Vous apprendrez pourquoi un tel examen pourrait être nécessaire, comment préparer votre enfant et à quoi vous pouvez vous attendre.</p><h2>En quoi consistent les examens par imagerie?</h2> <p>Votre enfant a de la difficulté à respirer ou à avaler. Pour trouver la cause du problème, le médecin doit regarder dans les voies respiratoires ou digestives de votre enfant. Pour ce faire, il utilisera un mince tube qui comprend une lumière et une petite caméra au bout. C’est ce que l’on appelle un endoscope.</p> <p>On donnera un médicament à votre enfant pour l’endormir, appelé anesthésie générale. Cela fera dormir votre enfant tout au long de l’opération et il ne ressentira aucune douleur.</p> <p>Si le problème est causé par des tissus anormaux, le médecin pourrait les retirer au moyen de la chirurgie au laser.</p> <p>Le médecin qui fera l’examen à l’aide de la sonde est un otorhinolaryngologiste et chirurgien de la tête et du cou (ORL). </p><p>C’est un médecin spécialisé dans les problèmes d’oreille, du nez et de la gorge.</p> <h3>Pour regarder dans les voies respiratoires de votre enfant, nous utilisons la bronchoscopie et la laryngoscopie</h3> <p>Les voies respiratoires supérieures de votre enfant commencent par la trachée. Pour regarder à l’intérieur, le médecin fera un examen par imagerie appelée bronchoscopie et une laryngoscopie. Pendant ces interventions, le médecin insèrera l'endoscope dans la bouche de votre enfant et dans la trachée. Le médecin peut voir ce qui cause les problèmes respiratoires de votre enfant à l’aide de la sonde. La procédure prend environ une heure.</p> <h3>Pour regarder dans le tube digestif de votre enfant, nous utilisons l’oesophagoscopie</h3> <p>La partie supérieure du tube digestif s’appelle oesophage. Pour voir à l’intérieur, le médecin utilisera une procédure d’imagerie appelée oesophagoscopie. Pendant l’intervention, le médecin placera l'endoscope dans la bouche de votre enfant jusqu’à l’œsophage. Au moyen de l'endoscope, le médecin peut voir pourquoi votre enfant a de la difficulté à avaler. La procédure prend environ une heure.</p> <h2>Chirurgie au laser</h2> <p>Dans la chirurgie au laser, on se sert d’un rayon de lumière concentrée au lieu d’un scalpel pour retirer des tissus ou des obstructions indésirables. Une opération au laser peut se faire pendant une bronchoscopie, une laryngoscopie ou une oesophagoscopie.</p><h2>À retenir </h2> <ul> <li>Les examens par imagerie permettent aux médecins de voir dans la gorge de votre enfant. L’examen prend environ une heure. </li> <li>L’enfant sera endormi pendant l’opération.</li> <li>Votre enfant passera probablement un jour et une nuit à l’hôpital.</li></ul> <h2>Problèmes possibles</h2> <p>Appelez l’otorhinolaryngologiste ou la clinique immédiatement si votre enfant montre l’un ou l’autre des signes suivants </p> <ul> <li>difficulté à avaler;</li> <li>difficulté à respirer;</li> <li>fièvre de 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus; </li> <li>douleur à la poitrine ou à la gorge qui empire;</li> <li>toux qui empire;</li> <li>écoulement de bave qui n’arrête pas;</li> <li>vomissements qui n’arrêtent pas;</li> <li>saignements de la bouche ou du nez.</li></ul> <p>S’il s’agit d’une urgence ou si vous êtes inquiet, n’attendez pas. Rendez-vous au service d’urgence le plus près immédiatement.</p> <p>Écrivez le nom de l’ORL ici :</p> <p>Écrivez le numéro du médecin ici :</p> <p>Écrivez le numéro de la clinique ici :</p> <p>Écrivez le nom et le numéro de téléphone de votre médecin de famille ici :</p><h2>Votre enfant ne ressentira pas de douleur pendant l’intervention</h2> <p>On donnera un médicament à votre enfant pour l’endormir, appelé anesthésie générale. Cela fera dormir votre enfant tout au long de l’opération et il ne ressentira aucune douleur. Après l’intervention, la gorge de votre enfant pourrait être sensible et sèche. Si votre enfant ressent de la douleur après l’intervention, on lui donnera des médicaments au besoin.</p><h2>Après l’intervention</h2> <p>Après l’intervention, votre enfant sera conduit vers la salle de réveil, aussi appelée l’unité de soins post-opératoires. C’est là que votre enfant se réveillera. Il restera dans la salle de réveil une ou deux heures, selon son âge et les symptômes.</p> <p>Après le séjour de votre enfant dans la salle de réveil, il sera transféré à l’unité d’otorhinolaryngologie, où un infirmier est toujours présent. C’est ce que l’on appelle la salle d’observation constante. Votre enfant passera probablement la nuit dans cette salle.</p> <h3>Vous pourrez voir votre enfant quand il sera réveillé</h3> <p>Un bénévole de la salle d’attente du bloc opératoire vous conduira vers votre enfant. </p> <p>Votre enfant pourrait avoir une toux légère ou une voix rauque après son réveil. Ces changements disparaissent habituellement d’eux-mêmes.</p> <h2>Manger et boire après l’intervention</h2> <p>Votre enfant ne pourra ni manger ni boire pendant deux à quatre heures après l’intervention. Vérifiez auprès de l’infirmier quand il pourra recommencer à manger et à boire. Votre enfant boira ensuite des liquides clairs comme de l’eau ou du jus de pomme. Ensuite, votre enfant pourra manger des aliments mous comme le Jello. Une fois que votre enfant pourra boire, il pourra recommencer à manger normalement. </p> <h2>Un jour et une nuit à l’hôpital</h2> <p>Votre enfant passera la journée entière à l’hôpital, pour l’intervention, et probablement la nuit. Tout dépendra de la rapidité avec laquelle votre enfant se rétablit. Un parent peut demeurer avec l’enfant pendant la nuit dans la salle d’observation constante.</p><h2>Avant l’opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l’opération, votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. L’infirmier ou le médecin vous dira quand votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. Écrivez ces renseignements ici :</p> <p>Date et heure de l’opération : _____________________</p> <p>Heure où l’enfant doit cesser de manger : __________________</p> <p>Heure où l’enfant doit cesser de boire des liquides clairs : ________________</p> <p>Autres choses à retenir : _________________</p>

 

 

Scoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgery1285.00000000000Scoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgeryScoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgerySEnglishOtolaryngologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Trachea;EsophagusEsophagus;TracheaTestsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-11-10T05:00:00ZJen Subica, RN, BSc;Pauline Lackey, RN;Tomka George, RN;Vito Forte, MD, FRCSC7.0000000000000069.00000000000001036.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Scoping procedures are used to look inside the throat. Learn why your child may have to have a scoping procedure, how to prepare and what to expect.</p><h2>What are scoping procedures?</h2> <p>Your child is having trouble breathing or swallowing. To find out what is causing this problem, the doctor needs to look inside your child's air or food passageway. To do this, the doctor will use a thin tube with a light and a tiny camera on the end. This device is called a scope. </p> <p>During the scoping procedure, your child will be given a special sleep medicine called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthetic</a>. This means your child will sleep through the procedure and feel no pain. </p> <p>If the problem is caused by tissue that is not normal, the doctor may remove it using laser surgery.</p> <p>The doctor who will do the scoping procedure is called an otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon (say: OH-toe-lar-ing-GOL-oh-jist). This is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ears, nose and throat. </p> <h3>To look inside your child's air passageway, we use bronchoscopy and laryngoscopy</h3> <p>Your child's air passageway is called the trachea (say: TRAY-key-ah). To look inside, the doctor will use scoping procedures called a bronchoscopy (say: bron-KOSS-co-pee) and a laryngoscopy (say: lar-ing-GOSS-co-pee). During each of these procedures, the doctor will put a scope in your child's mouth and down into the trachea. The doctor can look through the scope to see what is causing your child's breathing problem. The procedure takes about one hour. </p> <h3>To look inside your child's food passageway, we use esophagoscopy</h3> <p>Your child's food passageway is called the esophagus (say: ee-SOFF-ah-gus). To look inside it, the doctor will use a scoping procedure called an esophagoscopy (say: ee-SOFF-ah-GOSS-co-pee). During this procedure, the doctor will put a scope in your child's mouth and down into the esophagus. The doctor can look through the scope to see what is causing your child's swallowing problem. The procedure takes about one hour. </p> <h2>Laser surgery</h2> <p>Laser surgery uses a concentrated beam of light instead of a scalpel or knife to remove unwanted tissue or blockages. Laser surgery can be performed during a bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy and esophagoscopy.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Scoping procedures let doctors look into your child's throat. They take about one hour. </li> <li>Your child will have sleep medicine during the procedure. </li> <li>Your child will likely stay for one day and one night in the hospital. </li> </ul><h2>Caring for your child at home</h2> <p>Your child should drink plenty of liquids. Your child should start with eating soft foods. After that, your child can slowly go back to eating what they normally eat. </p> <p>Your child can bathe as usual.</p> <p>For the first few days, your child should have quiet activity only. They should stay home from school or day care. Your child can go back to school or day care when they are feeling better, or when your otolaryngology doctor says it is OK. </p> <p>Your child may have dryness in their throat. A humidifier in your child's room will help keep their nose and throat moist.</p> <h3>Pain management at home </h3> <p>Follow these instructions when your child goes home after the procedure.</p> <p>You may give your child medicine for pain.</p> <p>You may receive a prescription for pain medication before you leave the hospital. Follow the dosage instructions give to you by the pharmacist. Although these prescription pain medications can be beneficial, they are also potentially very dangerous if not used properly.</p> <p>When using these medications, if you notice any changes in either breathing or level of drowsiness that concern you, stop the medication and seek medical attention. If your child is unresponsive, call 911 immediately.</p> <p>Do not give your child over-the-counter medicine that may have a sedative effect (makes people sleepy) while giving the prescription for pain medicine. Examples of these medicines are decongestants and antihistamines. Discuss these medications with your pharmacist.</p> <p>You may give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> if they have pain. Give the dose printed on the bottle for your child's age. Do not give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a> for two weeks after the surgery. These medications could increase your child's risk of bleeding after the operation. Check with the nurse or doctor first before giving these medicines to your child.</p><h2>Possible problems after the procedure</h2> <p>Please call your child's otolaryngologist or the otolaryngology clinic right away if your child has any of the following signs after going home: </p> <ul> <li>trouble swallowing </li> <li>trouble breathing </li> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>chest pain or throat pain that gets worse </li> <li>coughing that gets worse </li> <li>drooling that does not stop </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>bleeding from mouth or nose </li> </ul> <p>If it is an emergency or if you are worried, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department right away.</p> <p>Write down the name of your child's otolaryngologist here:</p> <p>Write down the doctor's phone number here:</p> <p>Write down the otolaryngology clinic phone number here:</p> <p>Write down your family doctor's name and number here:</p><h2>Seeing the otolaryngologist again</h2> <p>Your otolaryngologist will tell you if they need to see your child again. You will be given an appointment in the otolaryngology clinic if it is needed.</p><h2>Your child will not feel any pain during the procedure</h2> <p>Before the procedure starts, your child will be given a special sleep medicine called <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anesthetic</a>. This makes sure your child will sleep through the procedure and will not feel pain. After the procedure, your child's throat may be sore and feel dry. If your child feels pain after the procedure, they will be given pain medicine as needed. </p><h2>After the procedure</h2> <p>After the procedure, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post-Anesthetic Care Unit</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the recovery room for one to two hours, depending on their age and symptoms. </p> <p>After your child has stayed in the recovery room, we will move them to a special room on the otolaryngology unit. This room has a nurse in it at all times. It is called the constant observation room. Your child will probably stay in this room overnight. </p> <h3>You will be able to see your child as soon as they are fully awake</h3> <p>A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child.</p> <p>Your child may have a mild cough or hoarse voice when they wake up. This usually will go away on its own.</p> <h2>Eating and drinking after the procedure</h2> <p>Your child will not be allowed to eat or drink for two to four hours after the procedure. Check with your child's nurse to see when your child can start eating and drinking. Your child will then start drinking clear liquids such as water or apple juice. Then your child may have soft foods such as Jell-O. After your child is able to drink, your child can start eating their usual food again. </p> <h2>One day and one night in the hospital</h2> <p>Your child will be in the hospital for the entire day of the procedure and probably overnight. This will depend on how quickly your child recovers after the procedure. One parent may stay with your child overnight in the constant observation room. </p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The nurse or doctor will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. Write this information here: </p> <p>The date and time of the operation: _____________________</p> <p>Time when your child must stop eating: __________________</p> <p>Time when your child must stop drinking clear fluids: ________________</p> <p>Other things to remember: _________________</p>Scoping procedures: Bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy and laser surgery

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