Categorizing brain tumoursCCategorizing brain tumoursCategorizing brain tumoursEnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000062.0000000000000455.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>A step-by-step introduction to the different types of childhood brain tumors. Answers from Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>There are more than 100 different types of brain tumours. Tumours are usually named after the type of cell they develop from. One example is a glioma, which grows out of glial cells. Tumours may also be described based on their location, such as a brainstem glioma. Sometimes the same tumour may have different names, which can be confusing. The name of a tumour can change as researchers learn more details about tumour cells.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>A primary brain tumour develops directly in the brain while a secondary tumour develops elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain.</li> <li>A benign tumour is not cancerous and grows slowly.</li> <li>A malignant tumour is cancerous, grows quickly, and can spread to other parts of the body.</li></ul>
Catégoriser les tumeurs cérébralesCCatégoriser les tumeurs cérébralesCategorizing brain tumoursFrenchNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000062.0000000000000455.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Introduction par étapes aux divers types de tumeurs cérébrales chez les enfants. Réponses des hôpitaux pédiatriques canadiens.</p><p>Il existe plus de 100 différents types de tumeurs cérébrales. On nomme habituellement les tumeurs selon le type de cellule où elles se développent. Par exemple, le gliome se développe dans les cellules gliales. On peut aussi décrire les tumeurs selon leur emplacement, comme le gliome du tronc cérébral. Le nom d'une tumeur peut changer à mesure que les chercheurs apprennent de nouveaux détails sur les cellules tumorales.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Les tumeurs cérébrales primitives se développent directement dans l’encéphale alors que les tumeurs secondaires se développent d’abord ailleurs dans le corps puis s’étendent à l’encéphale.</li> <li>Une tumeur cérébrale bénigne n’est pas cancéreuse et croît lentement.</li> <li>Une tumeur cérébrale maligne est cancéreuse, croît rapidement et peut se propager à d’autres parties du corps. </li></ul>

 

 

Categorizing brain tumours1322.00000000000Categorizing brain tumoursCategorizing brain tumoursCEnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC8.0000000000000062.0000000000000455.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>A step-by-step introduction to the different types of childhood brain tumors. Answers from Canadian Paediatric Hospitals.</p><p>There are more than 100 different types of brain tumours. Tumours are usually named after the type of cell they develop from. One example is a glioma, which grows out of glial cells. Tumours may also be described based on their location, such as a brainstem glioma. Sometimes the same tumour may have different names, which can be confusing. The name of a tumour can change as researchers learn more details about tumour cells.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>A primary brain tumour develops directly in the brain while a secondary tumour develops elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain.</li> <li>A benign tumour is not cancerous and grows slowly.</li> <li>A malignant tumour is cancerous, grows quickly, and can spread to other parts of the body.</li></ul><p>There are more than 100 different types of brain tumours. Tumours are usually named after the type of cell they develop from. One example is a glioma, which grows out of glial cells. Tumours may also be described based on their location, such as a brainstem glioma. Sometimes the same tumour may have different names, which can be confusing. The name of a tumour can change as researchers learn more details about tumour cells.</p> <p>You may also hear tumours being described in two other general ways:</p> <ol> <li>Where they begin to grow: primary and secondary tumours</li> <li>How fast they are growing: benign and malignant brain tumours. This may be also be described as the grade of a tumour.</li></ol> <h2>Primary and secondary brain tumours</h2> <p>A primary brain tumour develops directly in the brain. Most brain tumours in children are primary brain tumours.</p> <p>A secondary tumour is rare in children. It develops first somewhere else in the body, such as in the bones or skin. When these abnormal bone or skin cells spread to the brain, they are called a "secondary" tumour.</p> <h2>Benign and malignant brain tumours</h2> <p>A benign brain tumour is not cancerous. The cells in the tumour are growing slowly. Many benign brain tumours can be removed by surgery and they do not grow back. However, some benign brain tumours can be dangerous. This is because they are located in a part of the brain that is difficult to reach by surgery or in an important part of the brain that could be harmed by surgery.</p> <p>A malignant brain tumour is considered a cancer. This means the abnormal cells in the tumour are making copies of themselves quickly. As a result, the tumour grows quickly, and tumour cells can spread to other parts of the brain or spine. This is called metastasis. However, in many cases, cancerous tumours can be treated with good success. They rarely spread outside the central nervous system (CNS).</p> <p>Sometimes the distinction between benign and malignant is more complex. Some benign tumours can spread to other parts of the brain or spine. This may occur, for example, in the case of low grade gliomas. This does not mean that the tumour has become malignant . The low grade glioma that has spread can often be successfully treated with chemotherapy.</p> <p>Sometimes a benign tumour can transform into a malignant tumour. Although more common in adults, this can happen in children, especially teenagers.</p>Categorizing brain tumours

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