Helping your child cope with a brain tumourHHelping your child cope with a brain tumourHelping your child cope with a brain tumourEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSW7.0000000000000077.0000000000000320.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth answers and discussion of the extremely difficult task of helping your child cope and adjust to a brain tumour.</p><p>Even though you may feel as if your world has changed completely, your child may not feel that way. Keeping your usual family routines can help your child adjust to their illness because children thrive on routine. Keep in mind though that you may need to establish new routines to accommodate changes in your child's lifestyle. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Before adopting any particular coping strategies, consider your family's value systems and communication style.</li> <li>There are different coping strategies you can use for your child, your child's friends, and your family.</li></ul>
Aider votre enfant à composer avec la tumeurAAider votre enfant à composer avec la tumeurHelping your child cope with a brain tumourFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSW Deborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSW Heather Young, MSW, RSW7.0000000000000077.0000000000000320.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Réponses approfondies et discussion sur la tâche extrêmement difficile d’aider votre enfant à composer avec une tumeur cérébrale et à s’y ajuster.</p><p>Même si vous vous sentez comme si votre monde avait complètement changé, votre enfant pourrait ne pas partager ce sentiment. Le fait de garder votre routine familiale habituelle peut aider votre enfant à s’ajuster à la situation, car les enfants aiment la routine. N’oubliez pas que vous pourriez devoir établir de nouvelles routines afin de faciliter les changements de mode de vie de votre enfant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Avant d’adopter des stratégies d’adaptation particulières, tenez compte des systèmes de valeurs et du style de communication de votre famille.</li> <li>Il existe différentes stratégies d’adaptation que vous pouvez mettre en œuvre avec votre enfant, ses amis et votre famille.</li></ul>

 

 

Helping your child cope with a brain tumour1340.00000000000Helping your child cope with a brain tumourHelping your child cope with a brain tumourHEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSW7.0000000000000077.0000000000000320.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth answers and discussion of the extremely difficult task of helping your child cope and adjust to a brain tumour.</p><p>Even though you may feel as if your world has changed completely, your child may not feel that way. Keeping your usual family routines can help your child adjust to their illness because children thrive on routine. Keep in mind though that you may need to establish new routines to accommodate changes in your child's lifestyle. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Before adopting any particular coping strategies, consider your family's value systems and communication style.</li> <li>There are different coping strategies you can use for your child, your child's friends, and your family.</li></ul><h2>Coping strategies for your child</h2> <p>Before adopting any particular coping strategies, consider your family's value systems and communication style. Here are some suggestions that may help your child cope: </p> <ul> <li>Encourage your child to express their feelings in an age-appropriate way. This helps them feel understood and supported. Encourage your child to play — drawing or role-playing with puppets or dolls — to help them process what they are going through. </li> <li>Make your child the expert. Children love to talk to others about what the doctors did and how they dealt with procedures.</li> <li>Talk to your child and prepare them for what they will experience. Create opportunities for them to ask questions. If they ask you questions that you are not able to answer, for example about dying, ask your treatment team to help. </li> <li>Maintain routines as much as possible but be flexible as needed. For example, your child will appreciate if dinner is at a similar time every day but may not be able to attend school routinely anymore. </li> <li>Try to focus on things other than the brain tumour. Children lead active and busy lives. Although your child’s activities may be affected by the treatment, make an effort to focus on their other interests and let them participate in activities whenever possible. If your child cannot play certain sports such as soccer anymore, think of alternate ways in which they can participate, such as helping out the coach. Your child's school can help with this. </li></ul> <h2>Coping strategies for your child's friends</h2> <ul> <li>Find support for your child from peers. Help your child keep in touch with friends, classmates, and siblings as much as possible through letters, e-mails, cards, videos, and visits. You may be able to set up a website for your child that friends can check. </li> <li>Encourage your child's friends to visit them in the hospital.</li> <li>Find support groups for children with similar conditions through the hospital or organizations.</li></ul> <h2>Coping strategies for your family</h2> <ul> <li>Follow the same rules at home with your child as before the diagnosis. For example, if you suddenly allow your ill child to hit their sibling, they will sense that something is really wrong. This creates anxiety in your child and resentment in their sibling. </li> <li>Don’t buy your child lots of gifts. Although they may be happy briefly, getting gifts is not part of “normal” life and can create anxiety. A few small gifts to reward their courage may be appropriate. </li> <li>Try to make sure that family roles do not change too much. Older siblings should not become “substitute” parents. Social workers can help with issues concerning parenting or relationship counselling. </li> <li>Grandparents and other family members can help care for your other children. Accept their offers of help when offered. However, they may have their own opinions about how to parent your child. Try to maintain consistency in how your children are parented and make sure any alternate caregivers like grandparents follow a similar parenting style. </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/helping_your_child_cope_with_a_brain_tumour.jpgHelping your child cope with a brain tumour

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