Brain tumours and self imageBBrain tumours and self imageBrain tumours and self imageEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN10.000000000000060.0000000000000170.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning how your child's self-esteem may be affected by changes in appearance resulting from brain tumour treatment.</p><p>Your child or teenager may look different as a result of the tumour, or eventually, its treatment. They may have strabismus, which is difficulty coordinating the eyes. They may have difficulty controlling their body in the same way that they did before the tumour. For example, they may have problems with running or throwing a ball. During and after treatment, they may lose their hair, or have scarring or weight changes. Sometimes these changes may go away over time and sometimes they may be permanent. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child or teenager may look different as a result of the tumour, which can have an impact on their self-esteem and self image.</li> <li>Encourage your child to talk about their feelings and be aware of your reaction to your child's changes in appearance.</li> <li>There are several organizations available to help people with cancer feel better about their appearance.</li></ul>
Les tumeurs cérébrales et image de soiLLes tumeurs cérébrales et image de soiBrain tumours and self imageFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN10.000000000000060.0000000000000170.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements détaillés au sujet de la façon dont l’estime de soi de votre enfant pourrait être affectée par des changements d’apparence découlant du traitement contre une tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>L’apparence de votre enfant ou de votre adolescent pourrait changer en raison de la tumeur ou de son traitement. Il peut présenter du strabisme, c’est-à-dire de la difficulté à coordonner ses yeux. Il pourrait avoir de la difficulté à contrôler son corps comme avant l’apparition de la tumeur. Par exemple, il pourrait avoir de la difficulté à courir ou à lancer une balle. Pendant le traitement et par la suite, l’enfant pourrait perdre ses cheveux, avoir une cicatrice ou changer de poids. Parfois, ces changements disparaissent au fil du temps. D’autres fois, ils peuvent être permanents.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>L’apparence de votre enfant ou de votre adolescent pourrait changer en raison de la tumeur ce qui peut avoir des répercussions sur son estime de soi et son image de soi. Encouragez votre enfant à discuter de ses sentiments et surveillez votre réaction lorsque l’apparence de votre enfant change. Il existe plusieurs organismes destinés à aider les personnes atteintes de cancer à se réconcilier avec leur apparence.</li></ul>

 

 

Brain tumours and self image1342.00000000000Brain tumours and self imageBrain tumours and self imageBEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN10.000000000000060.0000000000000170.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information concerning how your child's self-esteem may be affected by changes in appearance resulting from brain tumour treatment.</p><p>Your child or teenager may look different as a result of the tumour, or eventually, its treatment. They may have strabismus, which is difficulty coordinating the eyes. They may have difficulty controlling their body in the same way that they did before the tumour. For example, they may have problems with running or throwing a ball. During and after treatment, they may lose their hair, or have scarring or weight changes. Sometimes these changes may go away over time and sometimes they may be permanent. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child or teenager may look different as a result of the tumour, which can have an impact on their self-esteem and self image.</li> <li>Encourage your child to talk about their feelings and be aware of your reaction to your child's changes in appearance.</li> <li>There are several organizations available to help people with cancer feel better about their appearance.</li></ul><p>Many children and teenagers become self-conscious or embarrassed about these changes. They may be especially anxious about whether their peers will accept their changes in appearance.</p> <p>It will take time and your child may need extra support to adjust to this life changing situation. Starting at diagnosis and throughout treatment, your child or teenager may have feelings of loss. They need to understand that these feelings are normal and that they are a unique individual going through an extraordinary situation. Encourage them to talk about their feelings. </p> <p>Be aware of your reaction to your child's changes in appearance. While it is healthy to show your emotions, if you are very distressed by how your child looks, it may upset them more. </p> <p>Keep in mind that self-image differs depending on developmental stage. For example, a toddler might not mind losing their hair or they might think it is great if their dad or other family members shave off their hair too. On the other hand, a teenager may be devastated by the loss of all their hair. Let your child take the lead on coping with their appearance. If they want, you can introduce them to choices for hair alternatives such as wigs, hair dyes, or hats. </p> <p>Numerous organizations are available to help people with cancer feel better about their appearance. The Look Good Feel Better Program (<a href="http://www.lgfb.ca/" target="_blank">www.lgfb.ca</a>), for example, holds workshops for teenage girls with cancer, to provide them with tips on improving their personal appearance. </p> <p>Eventually your child or teenager will get to a point where they feel comfortable with how they look. They may be able to think about these changes in a positive way and feel brave in handling their challenges. Emphasize your child’s character and strength in dealing with negative experiences, illness, or changes in appearance. As an example, you can talk about the change being the result of a tough decision they made to get back their health. The change becomes a sign of bravery, and not a sign that they are different. Another idea is to acknowledge your child’s strength by giving stickers on a calendar or “bravery” beads to make a necklace for each procedure they go through. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/brain_tumours_and_self_image.jpgBrain tumours and self image

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.