Brain tumours: Helping siblings copeBBrain tumours: Helping siblings copeBrain tumours: Helping siblings copeEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN7.0000000000000062.0000000000000447.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information on the extremely difficult task of helping siblings adjust to their brother or sister suffering from a brain tumour.</p><p>Siblings often get overlooked when their brother or sister is diagnosed with a serious illness. It can be a challenge for parents to meet the needs of all their children while looking after an ill child. It’s important to keep family life as normal as possible under the circumstances. Here are some ideas that may help siblings adjust. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Help siblings adjust by talking to them about their feelings, telling them information they need to know, and keeping their routines as normal as possible.</li></ul>
Les tumeurs cérébrales : Aider les frères et sœurs à composer avec la situationLLes tumeurs cérébrales : Aider les frères et sœurs à composer avec la situationBrain tumours: Helping siblings copeFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSW Deborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSW Heather Young, MSW, RSW Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN7.0000000000000062.0000000000000447.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements détaillés sur la tâche extrêmement difficile d’aider les frères et sœurs à s’ajuster au fait que leur frère ou leur sœur est atteint d’une tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>On néglige souvent les frères et sœurs de l’enfant gravement malade après le diagnostic. Il peut être difficile pour les parents de répondre aux besoins de tous leurs enfants tout en s’occupant d’un enfant malade. Il est important de garder votre vie familiale le plus normale possible dans les circonstances. Voici certaines idées qui pourraient aider les frères et sœurs à s’ajuster.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Soutenez les frères et soeurs en leur demandant comment ils se sentent, en leur donnant les renseignements nécessaires et en conservant leurs routines autant que possible.</li></ul>

 

 

Brain tumours: Helping siblings cope1344.00000000000Brain tumours: Helping siblings copeBrain tumours: Helping siblings copeBEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-14T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN7.0000000000000062.0000000000000447.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>In-depth information on the extremely difficult task of helping siblings adjust to their brother or sister suffering from a brain tumour.</p><p>Siblings often get overlooked when their brother or sister is diagnosed with a serious illness. It can be a challenge for parents to meet the needs of all their children while looking after an ill child. It’s important to keep family life as normal as possible under the circumstances. Here are some ideas that may help siblings adjust. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Help siblings adjust by talking to them about their feelings, telling them information they need to know, and keeping their routines as normal as possible.</li></ul><p>Ask your child how they feel. Any of the following feelings after diagnosis and during treatment are possible:</p> <ul> <li>Guilt: Siblings may feel guilty that they are not sick, or fear that they caused the tumour. Assure them that they did not. </li> <li>Jealousy or resentment: The child with a brain tumour will get lots of attention, and will be missing school because of treatment. Siblings may feel this is unfair. </li> <li>Isolated and abandoned: Siblings may be left in the care of others and will not see their parents as often.</li> <li>A need for attention: In the weeks after the diagnosis, siblings may complain of headaches, vomiting, and other symptoms related to a brain tumour. These may be real responses to the feelings they have, out of a desire to seek attention, or out of sympathy for the ill child. </li></ul> <p>Find sibling support groups through the hospital or organizations. Other children who have gone through the same experience can offer support and understanding. </p> <h2>Talk to your children</h2> <ul> <li>Review their day and ask about their interests.</li> <li>Tell them what to expect in terms of the changes they will see in family life, and in their sibling.</li> <li>Include them in discussions of the diagnosis, based on their understanding and interest.</li> <li>Update them about their sibling’s treatment and condition, but don’t tell them more than your child who is ill. Involve your child who is ill if they want to help inform their siblings about their condition. </li> <li>Keep the information you tell them simple. They do not need and they may not want to know every detail of what your child who is ill is going through. </li> <li>Thank them. It provides a positive reinforcement of the sacrifice they’re making in giving up time with you. </li> <li>Bring them to the hospital for visits and give them the chance to talk to the treatment team.</li> <li>Arrange for a special person for siblings to talk to. This could be a teacher, aunt, or uncle whom your children can confide in. If this works, don’t interfere with the relationship. </li></ul> <h2>Coping strategies for your family</h2> <ul> <li>Try to keep the routine as normal as possible.</li> <li>Arrange for your children to keep up with sports or music lessons, play time, and other activities.</li> <li>Follow the same rules for behaviour at home as before. For example, if you suddenly allow your ill child to hit their sibling, they will sense that something is really wrong. This can create anxiety and resentment among your children. </li> <li>Give siblings tasks so they feel they are helping the family. They could make cards, decorate their sibling’s room, or they may have ideas of their own. Some older siblings may like helping with more grown-up tasks. Just don't over do it. </li> <li>Try to make sure that family roles do not change too much. Older siblings should not become “substitute” parents. Social workers can help with issues concerning parenting or relationship counselling. </li> <li>Grandparents and other family members can help care for your other children. Accept their offers of help when offered. However, they may have their own opinions about how to parent your children. Try to maintain consistency in how your children are parented and make sure any alternate caregivers like grandparents follow a similar parenting style. </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Brain_tumours_helping_siblings_cope.jpgBrain tumours: Helping siblings cope

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