Anaesthetic for brain tumour surgeryAAnaesthetic for brain tumour surgeryAnaesthetic for brain tumour surgeryEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemProceduresAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCUte Bartels, MD7.0000000000000067.0000000000000643.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth description of preparation, procedure, and side effects associated with a child receiving anaesthetic during treatment for a brain tumour.</p><p>A general anaesthetic is a mix of medicines that puts your child into a deep sleep. While in this deep sleep your child will not feel any pain. You may also hear general anaesthetic called sleep medicine. Your child will need a general anaesthetic before undergoing brain tumour surgery.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Before your child receives a general anaesthetic you must follow the feeding instructions or the procedure will be delayed or cancelled.</li> <li>To reduce the chance of any problems, your child needs to be as healthy as possible before getting an anaesthetic.</li> <li>On the day of your child's operation, test, or treatment, your child's anaesthesiologist will meet with you to answer your questions and talk about your concerns. </li> <li>Your child may feel dizzy, grumpy, have a sore throat and cough, or feel sick to the stomach after they wake up.</li></ul>
Anesthésie pour les tumeurs cérébralesAAnesthésie pour les tumeurs cérébralesAnaesthetic for brain tumour surgeryFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemProceduresAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPC Ute Bartels, MD7.0000000000000067.0000000000000643.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Description détaillée de la préparation, de la procédure et des effets indésirables liés à un enfant qui reçoit une anesthésie pendant le traitement d’un tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>L’anesthésie générale est une combinaison de médicaments qui mettent votre enfant en état de sommeil profond. Pendant qu’il se trouve dans ce sommeil profond, votre enfant ne ressentira pas de douleur. Vous pourriez aussi entendre parler de l'anesthésie générale comme des médicaments pour dormir.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Avant que votre enfant ne reçoive une anesthésie générale, vous devez obligatoirement suivre les instructions d’alimentation ou l’intervention sera retardée ou annulée.</li> <li>Afin de réduire les risques de complications, votre enfant doit être en aussi bonne santé que possible avant de recevoir l’anesthésiant.</li> <li>Lors de la journée de l’intervention chirurgicale, de l’examen ou du traitement, l’anesthésiste de votre enfant vous rencontrera afin de répondre à vos questions et de discuter de vos préoccupations.</li> <li>Votre enfant pourrait être étourdi, grognon, avoir mal à la gorge et tousser ou avoir mal au cœur à son réveil.</li></ul>

 

 

Anaesthetic for brain tumour surgery1350.00000000000Anaesthetic for brain tumour surgeryAnaesthetic for brain tumour surgeryAEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemProceduresAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCUte Bartels, MD7.0000000000000067.0000000000000643.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth description of preparation, procedure, and side effects associated with a child receiving anaesthetic during treatment for a brain tumour.</p><p>A general anaesthetic is a mix of medicines that puts your child into a deep sleep. While in this deep sleep your child will not feel any pain. You may also hear general anaesthetic called sleep medicine. Your child will need a general anaesthetic before undergoing brain tumour surgery.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Before your child receives a general anaesthetic you must follow the feeding instructions or the procedure will be delayed or cancelled.</li> <li>To reduce the chance of any problems, your child needs to be as healthy as possible before getting an anaesthetic.</li> <li>On the day of your child's operation, test, or treatment, your child's anaesthesiologist will meet with you to answer your questions and talk about your concerns. </li> <li>Your child may feel dizzy, grumpy, have a sore throat and cough, or feel sick to the stomach after they wake up.</li></ul><h2>What can you feed your child before the anaesthetic? </h2> <p>You must follow these feeding instructions to lessen your child's chance of throwing up, which could hurt their lungs. If you do not follow these instructions your child's operation, test, or treatment will be delayed or cancelled. </p> <h3>Eight hours before the anaesthetic:</h3> <p>Make sure your child stops eating solid food. For example, if your child will be getting the anaesthetic at 8 a.m., do not give them anything to eat after 12 midnight. </p> <h3>Up to three hours before the anaesthetic:</h3> <p>Give your child clear liquids only. Examples of clear liquids are apple juice, water, popsicles, and ginger ale. Do not give your child milk or orange juice. Stop giving clear liquids three hours before your child will receive the anaesthetic. For example, if your child is getting the anaesthetic at 12 noon, stop giving clear liquids at 9 a.m. </p> <h3>From three hours before the anaesthetic until after your child wakes up:</h3> <p>Your child cannot have anything to eat, not even gum or candy. Your child also cannot have anything to drink, not even a sip of water. For example, if your child is getting the anaesthetic at 12 noon, they cannot have anything to eat or drink after 9 a.m. If your child needs to take prescription medicine, please talk to your child's doctor before giving the medicine. </p> <p>If your child is breastfeeding: Stop giving your child breast milk four hours before the anaesthetic. For example, if your child is getting the anaesthetic at 12 noon, stop breastfeeding at 8 a.m. </p> <h2>How can you help your child be less nervous? </h2> <p>To help your child feel less nervous, explain what will happen in simple words that they will understand. If your child knows what to expect before coming to the hospital, they will be better able to deal with the operation, test, or treatment. </p> <h2>When should you call your child's doctor? </h2> <p>To reduce the chance of any problems, your child needs to be as healthy as possible before getting an anaesthetic.</p> <p>If your child has any of these problems the day before or on the day of the operation, test, or treatment, call your child's doctor right away: </p> <ul> <li>a fever </li> <li>wheezing</li> <li>cough</li> <li>very runny nose</li> <li>feeling unwell</li></ul> <h2>How will your child receive the anaesthetic? </h2> <p>Your child will be given the anaesthetic in one of two ways. They may receive it through a small tube in a vein. This tube is called an intravenous (IV). Or, they may receive the anaesthetic through a face mask. </p> <p>If your child is very nervous, they may be given some medicine to swallow before giving the anaesthetic. This medicine will help calm your child down. </p> <h2>Who gives your child the anaesthetic? </h2> <p>The doctor that gives your child the general anaesthetic is called an anaesthesiologist. You may also hear this doctor called an anaesthetist. During your child's operation, test, or treatment, the anaesthesiologist will check your child's breathing, heartbeat, temperature, and blood pressure. Other doctors may help the anaesthesiologist. </p> <h2>What should you do if you have questions? </h2> <p>On the day of your child's operation, test, or treatment, your child's anaesthesiologist will meet with you to answer your questions and talk about your concerns. If you have questions before that day, you are welcome to come to the brain tumour clinic to meet with the anaesthesiologist. You can also call the anaesthesia department to ask questions or if you have special concerns. </p> <h2>Where will your child go after their surgery, test, or treatment? </h2> <p>Your child will go to the Post Anaesthetic Care Unit, also called the PACU. You may also hear this unit called the Recovery Room. Specially trained nurses will watch your child. These nurses will check your child's breathing, heartbeat, temperature, and blood pressure regularly. </p> <p>Your child will wake up soon after their operation, test, or treatment. You may be with your child as soon as they wake up.</p> <h2>Are there any possible side effects from an anaesthetic? </h2> <p>Yes, your child may have side effects, or problems, after an anaesthetic. For example, your child may feel dizzy, grumpy, have a sore throat and cough, or feel sick to the stomach. These types of side effects are usually minor. </p> <p>Your child may throw up after their operation, test, or treatment. If this happens, your child will get liquids and a medicine through a tube in a vein to help them stop throwing up. </p> <p>There is a very, very small chance that your child may have a serious problem during or after an anaesthetic. The serious problems may include an allergic reaction to a drug, brain injury, or a cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest means that the heart has stopped beating. The anaesthesiologist will watch your child very closely and will be ready to deal with these problems. If your child has a serious problem during or after the anaesthetic, they may have to stay at the hospital longer. </p> <h2>What if your child has pain after the surgery, test, or treatment? </h2> <p>If your child has pain, they will be given medicine for the pain. Your child may also get a medicine through a needle to freeze a part of your child's body so they will not feel any pain there. This is done before your child wakes up from the general anaesthetic. </p> <h2>What is informed choice or informed consent?</h2> <p>Informed choice is the option a person has to allow or not allow something to happen, like diagnostic procedures or treatment, after they have been informed of the benefits and risks of the options involved. If the person agrees, they give informed consent. Informed consent is required before your child receives anaesthetic. <br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/anaesthetic_for_brain_tumour_surgery.jpgAnaesthetic for brain tumour surgery

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