Side effects from radiation for brain tumoursSSide effects from radiation for brain tumoursSide effects from radiation for brain tumoursEnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZUte Bartels, MD7.0000000000000065.00000000000001992.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth discussion of the possible side effects of radiation for children with brain tumours.</p><p>When radiation therapy destroys tumour cells, it may also affect normal cells in the area being treated. This can cause side effects. The side effects from radiation therapy depend on the particular area of the body being treated, the amount of radiation being used, and the size of the area. Many of the side effects end a few weeks after finishing treatment, but some may have longer impacts. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>During radiation therapy, your child's body will use more energy than normal, causing your child to feel very tired.</li> <li>Side effects from radiation therapy include, fatigue two to three weeks after thearpy has ended; hair loss; nausea or vomiting; skin problems.</li></ul>
Effets indésirables de la radiothérapie pour tumeurs cérébralesEEffets indésirables de la radiothérapie pour tumeurs cérébralesSide effects from radiation for brain tumoursFrenchNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZUte Bartels, MD7.0000000000000065.00000000000001992.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Discussion approfondie sur les effets indésirables de la radiothérapie pour les enfants atteints de tumeurs cérébrales.</p><p>Quand la radiothérapie détruit les cellules tumorales, elle peut aussi affecter les cellules normales dans la région traitée. Il peut en résulter des effets indésirables. Les effets indésirables de la radiothérapie dépendent de la région en particulier du corps qui est traitée, de la quantité de rayonnement utilisée et de la taille de la région. Bon nombre de ces effets indésirables disparaissent quelques semaines après la fin du traitement, mais certains d’entre eux ont des répercussions à long terme. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Pendant la radiothérapie, le corps de votre enfant utilisera plus d’énergie qu’à l’habitude; votre enfant pourrait ressentir une grande fatigue.</li> <li>Les effets indésirables de la radiothérapie comprennent de la fatigue de deux à trois semaines après la fin de la thérapie, la perte des cheveux, des nausées ou des vomissements ainsi que des problèmes de peau.</li></ul>

 

 

Side effects from radiation for brain tumours1381.00000000000Side effects from radiation for brain tumoursSide effects from radiation for brain tumoursSEnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZUte Bartels, MD7.0000000000000065.00000000000001992.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth discussion of the possible side effects of radiation for children with brain tumours.</p><p>When radiation therapy destroys tumour cells, it may also affect normal cells in the area being treated. This can cause side effects. The side effects from radiation therapy depend on the particular area of the body being treated, the amount of radiation being used, and the size of the area. Many of the side effects end a few weeks after finishing treatment, but some may have longer impacts. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>During radiation therapy, your child's body will use more energy than normal, causing your child to feel very tired.</li> <li>Side effects from radiation therapy include, fatigue two to three weeks after thearpy has ended; hair loss; nausea or vomiting; skin problems.</li></ul><h2>Fatigue during radiation therapy</h2> <p>During radiation therapy, your child’s body will use more energy than it normally does. Your child may feel very tired. Other factors can add to the fatigue as well, such as the stress of coping with a serious illness and the trips made for treatment. Other treatments such as surgery or chemotherapy may also have an effect. Poor appetite and nutrition, lack of sleep, pain, nausea, vomiting, lack of physical activity, and low blood cell counts can also make fatigue worse. </p> <h3>What you can do</h3> <ul> <li> offer three meals and two to three nutritious snacks each day</li> <li> offer lots of fluids</li> <li> space out your child’s activities if possible. Allow times for rest, relaxation, and naps if necessary</li> <li> stay active, but don’t overdo it</li></ul> <h2>Fatigue after radiation therapy (somnolence syndrome)</h2> <p>Two to eight weeks after radiation therapy has ended, your child may start to have symptoms such as feeling drowsy, tired, irritable, or sleeping for hours. They may also have headaches, vomiting, a low-grade fever, and a loss of appetite. You may also see some of the same symptoms that the tumour caused. </p> <p>These symptoms are part of a condition called somnolence syndrome. Some parents find this upsetting, but the symptoms will usually go away in about two to four weeks. The symptoms are believed to be caused by damage to the covering of the nerve cells. </p> <p>There are no long-term effects.</p> <p>Stay in touch with your treatment team if you are worried about your child’s symptoms. If the symptoms are severe, dexamethasone may be given to help. </p> <h2>Hair loss</h2> <p>Hair loss is a common side effect of some chemotherapy drugs. </p> <p>Hair roots are also sensitive to radiation. Hair in the treatment area may fall out. In most cases the hair will regrow within two or three months. Sometimes, it may be a different colour or texture. However, higher doses of radiation may cause permanent hair loss. </p> <h3>What you can do</h3> <ul> <li> Your child may wish to wear a wig. You may be able to buy or borrow a wig. If you get a prescription, health insurance might cover part or all of the cost. </li> <li> If your child doesn’t want a wig, they may pick out several hats or scarves before hair loss begins. They could start wearing them before hair is lost to become comfortable with them. </li> <li> Use a mild shampoo and soft hair brush.</li> <li> Use a sun screen, sun block, hat, or scarf to protect his scalp from the sun if they lost hair on their head.</li></ul> <h2>Nausea or vomiting</h2> <p>If your child feels sick or is throwing up, the doctor may prescribe anti-nausea (anti-emetic) drugs. One example of an anti-nausea or anti-emetic drug is <a href="/Article?contentid=205&language=English">ondansetron​</a>. Sometimes your child may need more than one kind of anti-nausea drug. You will get to know how your child responds to each type of <a href="/Article?contentid=1375&language=English">chemotherapy​</a>. If your child has been vomiting a lot, the doctor or nurse may suggest oral rehydration therapy to replace the water and important electrolytes lost. This is usually a drink that contains sodium, <a href="/Article?contentid=220&language=English">potassium</a>, chloride, and sugars. </p> <h3>What you can do</h3> <ul> <li> Give your child small meals throughout the day. </li> <li> Serve crackers, toast, yogurt, pretzels, oatmeal, skinned chicken (baked or broiled), soft and bland fruits and vegetables. Popsicles or ice chips may help with the nausea. </li> <li> Avoid sweet, fried, or fatty foods.</li> <li> Try giving your child water, unsweetened fruit juice, or flat ginger ale between meals. Tell your child to drink slowly with small sips. </li> <li> Some foods, such as meats or chicken, may be more acceptable if they are served cold.</li> <li> If nausea occurs during chemotherapy, do not serve food for a few hours before.</li> <li> If your child has been vomiting, rinse their mouth with water. For smaller children wipe the inside of the mouth with a damp cloth. Do not give your child anything to drink or eat until the vomiting is under control. </li> <li> When your child can keep down clear liquids, try a full-liquid diet with small amounts of yogurt, milkshakes, pudding, or cream soups. Gradually work up to a regular diet. </li> <li> Keep the kitchen or dining room well aired so there are no bad smells.</li></ul> <h2>Skin problems</h2> <p>Some children will experience skin reactions in the area that had treatment. After two or three weeks of treatment, these areas might become red or brown, warm, and sensitive. In some situations the skin may peel or blister like a sunburn. </p> <p>The following are guidelines for the care of skin in the treated area:</p> <ul> <li> Gently cleanse the treated area with mild soap and lukewarm water. Pat the skin dry with a soft towel.</li> <li> If the skin becomes dry and itchy, do not scratch the area. If itchiness becomes a problem, the radiation oncologist will prescribe a cream to relieve it. Do not apply any other ointments, creams, deodorants, lotions, or powders to the treatment area. </li> <li> All treated areas should be protected from irritation due to rubbing and pressure. Avoid tight fitting clothes and harsh fabrics.</li> <li> Do not apply tape to the skin within the treated area.</li> <li> Do not expose the treated area to extremes of hot and cold, such as a hot bath or shower. Keep treated skin protected from the sun by using a large brimmed hat or clothes that cover the body. </li></ul> <p>The skin problems will get better gradually within two to six weeks after finishing treatment. Once the treatment is complete, creams or lotions may also be used. With time, the treated skin may become darker and appear tanned. Gradually it will return to normal. Remember to avoid exposing this area to excess sun. </p>Side effects from radiation for brain tumours

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