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Clinic visits and brain tumoursCClinic visits and brain tumoursClinic visits and brain tumoursEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-07T04:00:00ZJordann Dutton, RN Kristin Fry, RN Eric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth description of what happens at clinic visits during follow-up treatment when your child is back at home (i.e., chemo side effects, etc.)</p><p>After your child goes home from the hospital, treatment will continue with regular visits to the oncology clinic. Before your child leaves the hospital, you will meet their clinic nurse and be given their first appointment. Visits often take a long time, especially if extra tests are needed. Bring a favourite toy or game for your child, snacks, and perhaps a book for yourself. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child will continue to with regular visits to the oncology clinic even after they go home.</li> <li>At a clinic visit, your child will undergo routine tests, see the doctor, undergo special procedures, and receive chemotherapy or radiation if still on active treatment.</li></ul>
Visites cliniques et les tumeurs cérébralesVVisites cliniques et les tumeurs cérébralesClinic visits and brain tumoursFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-07T04:00:00ZJordann Dutton, RNKristin Fry, RNEric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Description approfondie de ce qui se passe aux visites cliniques pendant le traitement de suivi quand votre enfant est de retour à la maison (c.-à-d. effets indésirables de la chimiothérapie, etc.).</p><p>Après que votre enfant aura quitté l’hôpital, le traitement se poursuivra avec des visites régulières à la clinique d’oncologie. Avant que votre enfant reçoive son congé de l’hôpital, vous rencontrerez son infirmière clinicienne et un premier rendez-vous sera prévu. Les visites sont souvent longues, surtout si d’autres tests sont nécessaires. Amenez un jouet ou un jeu favori de votre enfant, des collations et peut-être un livre pour vous-mêmes. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Après que votre enfant aura quitté l’hôpital, le traitement se poursuivra avec des visites régulières à la clinique d’oncologie.</li> <li>Lors des visites cliniques, votre enfant subira des examens de routine, rencontrera le médecin, subira des interventions spéciales et recevra de la chimiothérapie ou de la radiothérapie si son traitement est toujours en cours.</li></ul>

 

 

Clinic visits and brain tumours1396.00000000000Clinic visits and brain tumoursClinic visits and brain tumoursCEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-08-07T04:00:00ZJordann Dutton, RN Kristin Fry, RN Eric Bouffet, MD, FRCPCFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An in-depth description of what happens at clinic visits during follow-up treatment when your child is back at home (i.e., chemo side effects, etc.)</p><p>After your child goes home from the hospital, treatment will continue with regular visits to the oncology clinic. Before your child leaves the hospital, you will meet their clinic nurse and be given their first appointment. Visits often take a long time, especially if extra tests are needed. Bring a favourite toy or game for your child, snacks, and perhaps a book for yourself. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Your child will continue to with regular visits to the oncology clinic even after they go home.</li> <li>At a clinic visit, your child will undergo routine tests, see the doctor, undergo special procedures, and receive chemotherapy or radiation if still on active treatment.</li></ul><h2>How frequent are clinic visits?</h2> <p>The frequency of your child’s clinic visits will vary depending on their particular treatment requirements. Some children have a clinic visit once per week, especially if they are receiving chemotherapy. Others may have a different schedule. </p> <h2>Who should come with your child?</h2> <p>Your child must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian who can give the doctor information and consent for treatment. Please do not bring other children to the clinic because of limited space and infection control requirements. </p> <h2>What happens in a clinic visit?</h2> <p>The procedure for each clinic visit may vary depending on which hospital your child is receiving treatment from, and what type of treatment he needs. Generally, you and your child will first need to register at the reception desk in the oncology clinic and present a plastic hospital card. If your child is to have blood tests, the treatment team may recommend giving a topical anaesthetic cream such as the EMLA patch to the needle site an hour ahead of the clinic visit. </p> <h3>Tests come first</h3> <p>If your child is still on active treatment, for example, receiving chemotherapy or radiation, a complete blood count (CBC) test is done by finger prick at the beginning of every clinic visit. After the finger prick test, you and your child will see the clinic nurse, who will bring you to an examination room. </p> <p>The clinic nurse will check your child’s height and weight, and will tell you what other tests your child needs. These may include additional blood tests, X-rays, or other procedures. The clinic nurse will explain the tests to you and answer any questions you or your child may have. If your child needs to have X-rays done, you will need to take them to the imaging department. </p> <h3>Seeing the doctor</h3> <p>Once back in the examination room, you and your child will meet with the doctor and nurse to discuss progress since the last visit. Your child’s main doctor works with a number of other oncologists, in what is called a clinic team. Sometimes your child will not be seen by their regular doctor, but instead will be seen by other doctors in the clinic team. Their findings will always be discussed with your child’s main doctor. </p> <p>During the clinic visit, your child's doctor may conduct a clinical exam. If your child is seen in clinic every week, the doctor may only do a clinic exam every four to six weeks. This time interval may vary depending on your child's treatment. The clinical exam essentially focuses on the neurological exam, which was described in the Diagnosis section of this resource centre. The doctor will assess your child's strengths, walking, balance, and fine motor movement. </p> <p>For more information, see the page entitled "<a href="/Article?contentid=1332&language=English">Neurological Examination</a>."</p> <p>During a clinical exam, the doctor will also do tests to assess the motion of your child's face and eyes. There may also be a hearing test. There will be less emphasis on examining the other organs in your child's body such as his heart, lungs, or liver, but if problems arise related to these organs, the doctor will look into it. </p> <h3>Special procedures</h3> <p>Sometimes a special procedure or treatment is needed, such as a lumbar puncture. In this case, the doctor or nurse will explain the test to you. You can choose to stay in the treatment room with your child or go to the waiting room. Afterwards, your child can lie down to rest. </p> <h3>Chemotherapy</h3> <p>If your child is to receive intravenous chemotherapy, they will need to go to another room. In some hospitals, this is referred to as the “IV” room. A nurse will access the IV or port. There are different types of chemotherapy: “quick push” chemotherapy and “infusion” chemotherapy. Quick push chemotherapy is given over a couple of minutes in one quick dose. Infusion chemotherapy is given over a longer period of time. </p> <h3>Radiation</h3> <p>If your child's plan of care includes radiation therapy, you and your child will meet with the radiation therapy treatment team to discuss the plans that are needed for radiation. Your child will be seen approximately once per week by the radiology and neuro-oncology team. </p> <h2>Before you leave</h2> <p>At the end of your child’s clinic visit, the hospital staff will arrange their next appointment. Remember to take your child’s hospital card and appointment card with you, as well as any prescriptions that the doctor has given you. </p>Clinic visits and brain tumours

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