Physiotherapy after brain tumour surgeryPPhysiotherapy after brain tumour surgeryPhysiotherapy after brain tumour surgeryEnglishNeurology;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZKrista Rose, BA, BSc, PT12.000000000000032.0000000000000480.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information on the importance of physiotherapy and exercise therapy to the rehabilitation process after brain tumour surgery.</p><p>Your child may benefit from doing exercise therapy to improve any physical challenges they may have. In the hospital, physical therapists, also called physiotherapists (PT), will help your child overcome challenges and may show you some exercises. Once your child is at home, they may need to continue using the services of a physical therapist in the community. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>After brain surgery, your child may see a physiotherapist to help your child overcome physical challenges.</li> <li>Your child may be assigned exercises to improve muscle strength such as neck exercises and balance exercises.</li></ul>
Physiothérapie après chirurgie pour une tumeur cérébralePPhysiothérapie après chirurgie pour une tumeur cérébralePhysiotherapy after brain tumour surgeryFrenchNeurology;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZKrista Rose, BA, BSc, PT12.000000000000032.0000000000000480.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Information détaillée sur l’importance de la physiothérapie et de la gymnastique rééducative dans le processus de réadaptation après une chirurgie pour retirer une tumeur cérébrale.</p><p>Votre enfant pourrait tirer profit de faire de la gymnastique rééducative afin d'améliorer les problèmes physiques qu'il pourrait avoir. À l’hôpital, des physiothérapeutes aideront votre enfant et pourront vous montrer quelques exercices. Quand votre enfant sera de retour à domicile, il pourrait continuer à tirer profit des services d'un physiothérapeute dans la collectivité. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Après une intervention chirurgicale au cerveau, votre enfant pourrait voir un physiothérapeute afin de l’aider à surmonter ses handicaps physiques.</li> <li>Des exercices pourraient être proposés à votre enfant afin d’améliorer sa force musculaire comme des exercices pour le cou et pour l’équilibre.<br></li></ul>

 

 

Physiotherapy after brain tumour surgery1405.00000000000Physiotherapy after brain tumour surgeryPhysiotherapy after brain tumour surgeryPEnglishNeurology;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZKrista Rose, BA, BSc, PT12.000000000000032.0000000000000480.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information on the importance of physiotherapy and exercise therapy to the rehabilitation process after brain tumour surgery.</p><p>Your child may benefit from doing exercise therapy to improve any physical challenges they may have. In the hospital, physical therapists, also called physiotherapists (PT), will help your child overcome challenges and may show you some exercises. Once your child is at home, they may need to continue using the services of a physical therapist in the community. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>After brain surgery, your child may see a physiotherapist to help your child overcome physical challenges.</li> <li>Your child may be assigned exercises to improve muscle strength such as neck exercises and balance exercises.</li></ul><h2>Neck exercises after neurosurgery</h2><p>After neurosurgery (brain surgery), your child’s neck muscles may be sore and they may not be able to move their neck very far. Your child’s physiotherapist will choose which exercises are the most appropriate after surgery. By the time your child leaves the hospital, they should be able to perform each exercise. </p><p>A few points to remember:</p><ul><li>Your child should do all the movements by himself — do not stretch your child’s neck.</li><li>Your child should do these exercises while sitting down, with their arms resting comfortably on their lap.</li><li>Each exercise should be done until your child feels a mild discomfort from the stretch.</li><li>You may have to sit in front of your child and place your hands on their shoulders to prevent their shoulders from moving. This ensures that the movement comes from your child’s neck.</li></ul><p>Do each of the following neck exercises three times. Repeat all exercises three times a day.</p><ul><li>Neck flexion. Your child should bring their chin to their chest. Hold for 10 seconds and straighten up.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_neck_flexion_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Next extension. Your child should look up to the ceiling. Hold for 10 seconds and straighten up.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_neck_extesion_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Neck side flexion. Your child should bring their ear to their shoulder on the right side. Hold for 10 seconds and bring the head back upright. Do 3 to the right side and then 3 to the left side. Make sure your child doesn’t lift their shoulder up to touch their ear.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_neck_side_flexion_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Neck rotation. Your child should turn their chin to their shoulder on the right side. Hold for 10 seconds and return to face forward. Do 3 to the right side and then 3 to the left side.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_neck_exercises_rotation_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>Balance exercises after neurosurgery</h2><p>Your child may have balance problems caused by the tumour, the surgery, or both. You can help your child to do some exercises to improve their balance when they go home from the hospital. Check with your child’s physiotherapist before doing these. </p><p>A few points to remember:</p><ul><li>Make sure that an adult is always present.</li><li>Do these activities a few times a day.</li><li>Pick 2 or 3 activities to work on at a time.</li><li>These exercises are generally suitable for children aged 5 and up.</li></ul><p>Try these balance exercises:</p><ul><li>Practise walking on a curb with 1 foot in front of the other. Or put a piece of masking tape on the ground/floor and practice walking with 1 foot in front of the other. When this is easy, try this with the eyes closed.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_walk_line_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise standing on 1 leg. Count how long your child can hold this position. Try to beat this record each time.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_stand_one_leg_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Once your child can balance on 1 leg easily, stand on the right leg and practise bending the right knee 5 times. Repeat with the left leg.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_stand_one_leg_bend_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Play catch with your child. Once they can do this, make it more challenging by throwing the ball to the right or left side, up high or down low.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_catch_ball_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise kicking a ball with your child. Make it more challenging by kicking the ball to your right or left side so that they have to step and reach for the ball.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_kick_ball_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise walking backwards or sideways.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_walk_backward_or_sideways_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise walking upstairs or downstairs without holding onto a railing.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_stairs_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise walking on the toes and on the heels.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_walk_heels_or_toes_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise grapevine walking — crossing over the feet.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_grapevine_walk_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise playing "Simon says" with your child. Use different movements to make it harder if it gets too easy.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_simon_says_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise hitting a balloon back and forth with your child. Make sure there is lots of open space to avoid tripping.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_balloon_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise drawing numbers or letters in the air with the arms or legs.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_draw_numbers_letters_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <ul><li>Practise stepping up onto a step and back down again. When this becomes too easy, practise stepping over a small object and then back over it again.</li></ul> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_balance_exercises_step_over_object_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure><br>Physiotherapy after brain tumour surgery

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