When brain tumour treatment affects learningWWhen brain tumour treatment affects learningWhen brain tumour treatment affects learningEnglishNeurology;DevelopmentalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000055.00000000000001048.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information concerning the impact that treatment, tumours, and surgery may have on your child's ability to learn.</p><p>Some children treated with radiation therapy or with certain types of chemotherapy develop problems with learning. These are called neurocognitive late effects. They do not appear right away, but develop slowly and appear one to two years after treatment. </p> <p>If your child is at risk of developing these problems, you and your child’s teachers will need to work together to make sure your child has the extra help they need. In some cases, a neuropsychological assessment may be needed to help understand your child’s abilities and areas needing special education services. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Radiation or certain types of chemotherapy can cause learning problems in some children.</li> <li>Children may develop problems with reading, writing, math, speech, attention and memory.</li> <li>Early intervention is important to address any learning problems your child may experience.</li> <li>A neuropsychological assessment can help to provide recommendations for your child in the classroom.</li></ul>
Quand le traitement des tumeurs cérébrales affecte l’apprentissageQQuand le traitement des tumeurs cérébrales affecte l’apprentissageWhen brain tumour treatment affects learningFrenchNeurology;DevelopmentalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000055.00000000000001048.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements détaillés sur les répercussions que le traitement, les tumeurs et la chirurgie pourraient avoir sur la capacité d’apprendre de votre enfant.</p><p>Certains enfants traités par radiothérapie ou par certains types de chimiothérapie développent des problèmes d’apprentissage. C’est ce que l’on appelle des séquelles neurocognitives. Elles n’apparaissent pas immédiatement, mais se développent lentement et se déclarent une ou deux années après le traitement.</p> <p>Si votre enfant risque de développer ces problèmes, vous et les professeurs de votre enfant devrez travailler en collaboration afin de vous assurer que votre enfant reçoit l’aide supplémentaire dont il a besoin. Dans certains cas, une évaluation neuropsychologique pourrait être nécessaire afin de mieux comprendre les capacités de votre enfant et les secteurs qui exigent des services d’éducation spéciaux.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Certains enfants traités par radiothérapie ou par certains types de chimiothérapie développent des problèmes d’apprentissage.</li> <li>Les enfants peuvent présenter problèmes d’écriture, de lecture, avec les mathématiques, d’élocution, d’attention et de mémoire.</li> <li>Une intervention précoce est importante afin de résoudre les troubles d’apprentissage que pourrait vivre votre enfant.</li> <li>Une évaluation neuropsychologique peut permettre aux professionnels de la santé d'offrir des recommandations qui aideront votre enfant en classe.</li></ul>

 

 

When brain tumour treatment affects learning1408.00000000000When brain tumour treatment affects learningWhen brain tumour treatment affects learningWEnglishNeurology;DevelopmentalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000055.00000000000001048.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information concerning the impact that treatment, tumours, and surgery may have on your child's ability to learn.</p><p>Some children treated with radiation therapy or with certain types of chemotherapy develop problems with learning. These are called neurocognitive late effects. They do not appear right away, but develop slowly and appear one to two years after treatment. </p> <p>If your child is at risk of developing these problems, you and your child’s teachers will need to work together to make sure your child has the extra help they need. In some cases, a neuropsychological assessment may be needed to help understand your child’s abilities and areas needing special education services. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Radiation or certain types of chemotherapy can cause learning problems in some children.</li> <li>Children may develop problems with reading, writing, math, speech, attention and memory.</li> <li>Early intervention is important to address any learning problems your child may experience.</li> <li>A neuropsychological assessment can help to provide recommendations for your child in the classroom.</li></ul><p>Some of the late effects that children may experience are:</p> <ul> <li> Handwriting problems</li> <li> Spelling problems</li> <li> Reading problems</li> <li> Math problems</li> <li> Attention and concentration problems: A child may be inattentive, hyperactive, or both. They may not be able to concentrate for more than short periods of time. </li> <li> Slowness: It takes a child longer to do tasks or understand things than before, or compared to other children.</li> <li> Memory: A child may study a topic many times, but not remember it the next day.</li> <li> Planning and organizing: A child might have difficulty finishing assignments, expressing ideas in writing or verbally, or finding the way to school. </li> <li> Drop in IQ (intelligence quotient)</li></ul> <h2>Who is the most at risk of developing problems?</h2> <p>Research has shown that several different factors can affect the risk of developing problems. These include:</p> <ul> <li> The type of treatment. Whole brain radiation does more damage than stereotactic or conformal radiation, or radiation to other parts of the body. With chemotherapy, children who received intrathecal methotrexate are more likely to need special education services. </li> <li> Age at treatment. In younger children, the nervous system is less developed and more likely to be damaged by radiation. Children under the age of three are more likely to suffer serious effects. </li> <li> Sex of child. Several studies have shown that girls are affected more often and more severely than boys. Nobody knows why exactly. </li></ul> <h2>Can this late effect be prevented?</h2> <p>Doctors try to reduce the effect of radiation as much as possible. They will also try to delay radiation therapy as long as they can, because it affects younger children more. Radiation therapy is not generally given to very young children. </p> <p>When young children are diagnosed with a brain tumour, chemotherapy may be given to control the tumour until the child is older, and then radiation therapy may be given. </p> <h3>What causes this?</h3> <p>The brain has many thinking cells (neurons). These cells are connected by electrical pathways (axons). A type of insulation called white matter surrounds these pathways. It increases the speed of communication between cells. The radiation damages this insulation or white matter. As a result, the messages that travel back and forth along the pathways between thinking cells are not delivered as fast or effectively. </p> <p>The radiation also damages blood vessels in the brain. At the moment, we don’t know how this affects learning. </p> <h3>What can be done?</h3> <p>Experience has shown that the best way to teach children is using direct, one-on-one instruction. If your child is not getting extra resources, find out what they are entitled to have and try to find ways to make sure they get it. </p> <p>If a child has had radiation therapy, early interventions are important. Try and meet with a neuropsychologist to get as much information as possible. In general, children in Kindergarten and Grade 1 need to develop their basic reading, writing, and math skills as much as they can, even beyond what their classmates are doing. Extra tutoring or other supports are important even at this stage, before you see any changes. Once the effects of the radiation take effect, it is much more difficult to learn these skills. </p> <p>At home, children can benefit from an environment rich in language and numbers. Reading lots of stories, doing number rhymes and counting together, and working on math and reading exercise books will help. School-aged siblings may be able to help as well. Teachers or a school liaison person may be able to recommend good resources to use at home. </p> <p>Children may find it difficult to learn a second or third language. This may be an issue for families who speak more than one language, or who do not speak English at home. The treatment team may have suggestions to deal with this issue. </p> <p>In school, some children may need to use special education services. Some may do just fine in high school and go on to university, while others will do better in a vocational program. </p> <p>A neuropsychological assessment can help to provide some specific recommendations for your child In the classroom setting. This type of assessment is conducted by a neuropsychologist who works within the hospital. Speak to your treatment team for a referral to a neuropsychologist. For more information, see the "Neuropsychological Assessment" page in this section. The school can conduct a similar but less detailed type of assessment called a psychoeducational assessment. For either type of assessment, a report will be written and will include suggestions that are specific for your child. Some of the following suggestions may be appropriate for some children: </p> <ul> <li> your child near the front of the classroom to help focus and avoid distraction.</li> <li> Provide less written work.</li> <li> Use visual tools to teach such as charts and illustrations.</li> <li> Provide assistance with the organization of projects.</li> <li> Use tape-recorded textbooks.</li> <li> Provide assistive technology such as voice-activated software.</li> <li> Allow extra time for tests and assignments.</li> <li> Provide extra help with problem areas.</li> <li> Develop a modified learning regime.</li> <li> Provide special education.</li> <li> Ask the teacher to “check in” with your child each day to see how they are doing.</li> <li> Provide frequent rest breaks.</li></ul> <p>Finally, you can help your child find a skill or interest that they are good at. For example, your child’s creativity may be the same or even greater. Focus on your child’s successes. </p> <h2>The emotional impact of learning problems</h2> <p>It can be hard on your child if they do develop learning problems as a result of the tumour or treatment. Tasks that they once did routinely may become more difficult. They may see their classmates moving ahead at a faster pace than they can. Sometimes, if there are certain changes in the brain, your child may find it more difficult to regulate their emotions. They may become frustrated wtih homework and irritated with daily activities. </p> <p>It can be helpful to talk to your child about these problems, to see what they feel and how you can help deal with any issues.</p> <p>Some other ideas that may help your child are:</p> <ul> <li> Focus on your child’s other skills, talents, and interests. Provide opportunities for them to show their skills.</li> <li> Advocate for your child in school. Creating a supportive environment in school with their teacher and classmates will make it easier for your child. Ensuring that extra supports are available will help their learning. </li> <li> Emphasize your child’s personality. Rather than focusing on grades, praise your child when it’s appropriate for their actions and efforts. </li></ul>When brain tumour treatment affects learning

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