Coping with the brain tumour and its treatmentCCoping with the brain tumour and its treatmentCoping with the brain tumour and its treatmentEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSW Deborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSW Heather Young, MSW, RSW Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000066.0000000000000149.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information on coping with a brain tumour and its treatment. </p><p>Taking care of a child who has a brain tumour can have a huge impact on everyone in your family: your child who has a brain tumour, their siblings, you and your partner, grandparents, and other caregivers. Taking care of a child who has a brain tumour can also have a huge impact on the relationship between the parents. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Try to develop and maintain an open line of communication between you, your family and other caregivers.</li> <li>Try to keep to a normal routine as much as possible, asking for help when needed.</li> <li>There are many resources that can help such as social workers, child life specialists, and support groups.</li></ul>
Composer avec la tumeur et le traitementCComposer avec la tumeur et le traitementCoping with the brain tumour and its treatmentFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSWDeborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSWHeather Young, MSW, RSWLaura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000066.0000000000000149.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Renseignements détaillés sur Composer avec la tumeur et le traitement.</p><p>Si votre enfant a reçu un diagnostic de tumeur cérébrale, les répercussions pourraient être importantes pour tous les membres de votre famille : votre enfant atteint d’une tumeur cérébrale, ses frères et sœurs, vous et votre conjoint, les grands-parents et d’autres fournisseurs de soins. Le fait de prendre soin d’un enfant atteint d’une tumeur cérébrale peut avoir d’importantes répercussions sur la relation entre les parents. </p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Essayez de maintenir une ligne de communication ouverte entre les membres de votre famille et les soignants.</li> <li>Essayez de conserver une routine aussi normale que possible et demandez de l’aide au besoin.</li> <li>Il existe plusieurs ressources qui peuvent vous venir en aide comme les travailleurs sociaux, les spécialistes de l’enfance et les groupes de soutien.</li></ul>

 

 

Coping with the brain tumour and its treatment1412.00000000000Coping with the brain tumour and its treatmentCoping with the brain tumour and its treatmentCEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemNAAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00ZDavid Brownstone, MSW, RSW Deborah S. Berlin-Romalis, BSW, MSW, RSW Heather Young, MSW, RSW Laura Janzen, PhD, CPsych, ABPP-CN9.0000000000000066.0000000000000149.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Detailed information on coping with a brain tumour and its treatment. </p><p>Taking care of a child who has a brain tumour can have a huge impact on everyone in your family: your child who has a brain tumour, their siblings, you and your partner, grandparents, and other caregivers. Taking care of a child who has a brain tumour can also have a huge impact on the relationship between the parents. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul><li>Try to develop and maintain an open line of communication between you, your family and other caregivers.</li> <li>Try to keep to a normal routine as much as possible, asking for help when needed.</li> <li>There are many resources that can help such as social workers, child life specialists, and support groups.</li></ul><figure> <img alt="" /> </figure> <p>First of all, it is important for you and your family to know that there is nothing that you could have done to prevent your child from developing a brain tumour. Try not to feel guilty about it. </p> <p>Try to develop an open line of communication between your family members and caregivers. Establish a communication tree so that one family member is responsible for updating the rest of the family and friends about your child's status. This will help you focus on caring for your child instead. </p> <p>Keeping to your usual family routines as much possible can help your child adjust to their illness. Keep in mind though that sometimes you may need to establish new routines to accommodate changes in your child's lifestyle. Many children who have a serious illness such as a brain tumour learn to adjust to their situation over time, with the right support. But like adults, children have good days and bad days. </p> <p>It can be a challenge for you to meet the needs of all your children while looking after an ill child. Grandparents and other family members can help care for your other children. Accept their offers of help when offered. However, they may have their own opinions about how to parent your child. Try to maintain consistency in how your children are parented and make sure any alternate caregivers like grandparents follow a similar parenting style. </p> <p>Look for resources that can help you, your child, and the rest of your family through this challenge. Leading treatment centres in usually have social workers and child life specialists on staff to help all of you cope. These professionals can also provide you with information about practical matters such as accommodations for you and your family while you child is in hospital, and transportation issues. </p> <p>The articles in this section offer some suggestions to help all the members of your family cope with your child’s tumour and treatment. </p>Coping with the brain tumour and its treatment

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